Rechercher dans la communauté

Affichage des résultats pour les étiquettes 'residents'.



Plus d’options de recherche

  • Rechercher par étiquettes

    Saisir les étiquettes en les séparant par une virgule.
  • Rechercher par auteur

Type du contenu


Forums

  • Projets immobiliers
    • Propositions
    • En Construction
    • Complétés
    • Transports en commun
    • Infrastructures
    • Lieux de culture, sport et divertissement
    • Projets Annulés
  • Discussions générales
    • Urbanisme et architecture
    • Nouvelles économiques
    • Technologie, jeux vidéos et gadgets
    • Technologies urbaines
    • Discussions générales
    • Divertissement, Bouffe et Culture
    • L'actualité
    • Hors Sujet
  • Aviation MTLYUL
    • Discussions générales
    • Spotting à YUL
  • Ici et ailleurs
    • Ville de Québec et reste du Québec
    • Toronto et le reste du Canada
    • États-Unis d'Amérique
    • Europe
    • Projets ailleurs dans le monde.
  • Photographie et vidéos
    • Photographie urbaine
    • Autres photos
    • Anciennes photos

Calendriers

Aucun résultat à afficher.

Aucun résultat à afficher.

Blogs

Aucun résultat à afficher.

Aucun résultat à afficher.


Rechercher les résultats dans…

Rechercher les résultats qui…


Date de création

  • Début

    Fin


Dernière mise à jour

  • Début

    Fin


Filtrer par nombre de…

Inscription

  • Début

    Fin


Groupe


Biography


Location


Intérêts


Occupation

59 résultats trouvés

  1. Wednesday September 21, 2016 Mississauga condo developer forgets to put 120 bathrooms in brand new building Condo living is supposed to be simple. So you can imagine the shock of some Mississauga condo owners when they moved into their units and discovered that something simple was missing: None of the units in the 35 storey building had been equipped with a bathroom. In his interview with This is That, developer Jordan Petrescu, admitted a mistake had been made but surprisingly was not willing to take the blame. "There are no bathrooms in the units, but there were also no bathrooms on the plans or in our show suites," says Mr. Petrescu, "so technically, our customers bought these units knowing they were bathroomless." Click listen to hear how residents are now forced to use a porta-potty in the parking garage as a bathroom.
  2. I've lived in Montreal almost 10 years, and I've come to the pretty clear conclusion that we have a huge litter problem in the city. I've decided to start a conversation and to try to do something about it, so I'm going to go ahead and gather some thoughts, and I invite anyone interested in the subject to pitch their ideas. Step 1. Admit there is a problem. It seems that this is one of the hardest steps for us to take. Try taking a walk down a couple of residential streets in the Plateau for example, or up Du Parc or Cote Des Neiges. Have someone from another city visit you. A couple of people from Latin America have said to me something like "people here are disgusting" while looking at all the litter in the street. I've pointed out how offensive this is by the way (it's common in some Hispanic cultures, including my own, to say things like this), and I don't think the same way, but it does highlight our litter problem. A friend who lives in New York thinks that Montreal doesn't "need" to be this dirty. Many arguments against the idea that Montreal is dirty are based on comparisons to other cities; "it's the same everywhere." Although I don't think this invalidates the point that Montreal streets are dirty, I'm also sure that it is not the same everywhere. You don't find this much litter in dense neighbourhoods of Chicago for example. Other arguments are about Winter, but then again, just take a walk today. It hasn't snowed in months. You may not notice the issue if you have lived here since childhood, but visitors do notice it, and people from outside of Canada are the most surprised. Step 2. Identify the direct causes of the problem. There are many causes of this problem. I'd like to identify the direct ones, even if they are not to be tackled directly. Let me explain what I mean; Instead of saying "there are not enough garbage cans" I will say "Many people don't wait to see a garbage can before they dispose of their garbage". It is important to understand direct causes because it allows us to break paradigms and think of the problem from different perspectives. Here is the list of direct causes I have noticed over the years (in no particular order): 1) Many pedestrians don't wait to see a garbage can before they dispose of their garbage. 2) Many drivers throw litter from their vehicles. 3) Many residents dispose their garbage outside without using proper garbage bags. 4) Many residents dispose their garbage outside during the wrong hours/days (see the next point). 5) Garbage bags are attacked by squirrels and other animals, as well as by people looking for cans to recycle. 6) Often garbage bins/cans overflow. 7) Garbage collection is often done without care, letting some of the litter fall off the bins and trucks. 8) Many people leave their litter behind in public parks and squares. 9) Sometimes wind blows garbage out of bins/cans. 10) Many smokers throw their cigarette butts on the ground. I'm going to pause here for now, but I'd like this conversation to go on and produce ideas and solutions. Feel free to give me your thoughts!
  3. Lecture intéressante!! CARY PLANTATION, Me. — Up here, near the end of Interstate 95, a single main road ridged with stately conifers runs past the odd house that at night casts an orange glow over the snow. There is no school. No police department. Not even a stoplight. But there are property taxes. And some residents say the taxes’ growth has pushed this community of about 200 to the brink. To save Cary Plantation, they say, they want to dismantle it. “What do you do, what does the town do, when they can’t pay their bills? Do we go bankrupt? Do we lose our homes?” asked Diane Cassidy, a former nursing assistant. “There was no answer, other than deorganization.” Ms. Cassidy is leading an effort to dissolve the local government and join the Unorganized Territory, a vast swath of forest and townships in north, central and eastern Maine run by a partnership between the state and the counties. Last month, residents here voted, 64 to 0, to continue the process. At a time of rising municipal costs, local governments around the country are looking for ways to rein in tax bills, pursuing privatization, the consolidation of services, mergers and even bankruptcy. But in northern Maine, as operating costs have increased, the economy has stagnated and the population has aged and dwindled, a handful of struggling towns have pursued the unusual process of eliminating local government entirely. In the West, citizens are protesting to constrain government power. And over all, Americans tend to resist ceding their local authority. But these communities are handing their governing power over to the state and the county. “Knowing how dependent towns are in Maine on the property tax, they may have just reached a point where they’ve decided, ‘We’d be better off just not existing as a town,’ ” said Elizabeth K. Kellar, the chief executive of the Center for State and Local Government Excellence in Washington. Under state law, dismantling a local government takes 12 complex steps, often over at least two years, including legislative approval and a series of local votes. When a town deorganizes, state agencies and the county administer its services, like snow removal, policing and firefighting. Children are assigned to appropriate schools, often in a nearby district. Town-owned buildings and land are sold or held in trust by the state or the county. And every local government job is eliminated. Thus, there are no local officials’ salaries to pay and no infrastructure to maintain locally. And the cost of servicing each township is spread across the Unorganized Territory either in each county or statewide. “It’s basically like a company: There’s so much less overhead,” said Paul G. Bernier, the public works director for Aroostook County, who is responsible for overseeing services to the unorganized territories at the very top of Maine. “Sometimes it’s half of what they were paying.” In Aroostook County, Bancroft, population 60, completed the process last summer and now exists in name only. Besides Cary Plantation, Oxbow, about an hour northwest, is well on its way, although both have legislative approval and a final vote yet to go. State officials said that an effort to deorganize Atkinson, which began in 2013, may soon take a step forward, and that more municipalities had told the state that they were interested. Advertisement Continue reading the main story “Just the price tag to keep their local governments up and running is more or less untenable,” said Mark Brewer, a professor of political science at the University of Maine. “It’s the final step in this long, drawn-out process, which really starts with population decline.” Marcia McInnis, the fiscal administrator for the Unorganized Territory, estimated there have been 41 deorganizations in Maine’s history, about half of them during the Great Depression. But “it has become recently more common than it has been in the last, really, two decades,” she said. The last town to deorganize before Bancroft was Centerville, population two dozen, in 2004. There have also been deorganization attempts that failed at the local level, often because residents did not want to lose local control, or in some cases did not secure legislative approval. Photo A map of Cary Plantation. Residents there recently voted unanimously to continue the deorganization process. Credit Tristan Spinski for The New York Times “I attribute the recent increase in interest in deorganizing as a direct result of the economic Great Recession and in the loss of jobs in the logging industry,” Ms. McInnis said. Steve Sherman, a lifelong resident of Oxbow, where roughly 50 people are spread across six miles, began working to disband the government after years of watching the local labor market for papermaking and farming shrink along with the population. In November, 21 residents voted unanimously to move forward with deorganization; a third vote will take place in the future. “We’re not growing here. We’re headed the other way, it would seem,” said Mr. Sherman, a logger and Christmas tree farmer. “That’s just life, in northern Maine especially.” In Oxbow and in Cary Plantation, local government is already all but gone. Local meetings in Cary are held in Ms. Cassidy’s heated garage. With no public building, records are generally stored in officials’ homes. And most services are already contracted out. “I figure the state can do a better job,” Ms. Cassidy said. Other states have unorganized or unincorporated areas, but in Maine about half of the land is Unorganized Territory. The area predates the state itself — it was laid out when Maine was still part of Massachusetts and new settlers were expected to flock there. But the harsh climes of Maine’s wild lands, as they used to be known, never filled out with enough people to self-govern. “Maine has this oddity of having all of this space in an area of the country that cherishes town meetings and town governments,” said Kenneth Palmer, a professor emeritus at the University of Maine. “These tiny towns don’t have enough people to generate the municipal staff to really run the town. It’s this abandonment of a town structure.” But some in Cary say deorganizing is a way to give the community a new lease on life, not to abandon it. “I think it’s going to bring more people in,” said Kai Libby, 55, a retired Border Patrol agent who became the town’s first assessor last year to help shepherd the deorganization effort through the multistep process (and thus eliminate his own position). Mr. Libby and his wife, Tina, who led the withdrawal of Cary from its school district, live in the only house on their road, with a vast tract of land, enough space for four dogs and stacks of documents related to deorganization near their kitchen table. “There’s privacy, and it’s so quiet,” said Ms. Libby, 51. “We want to stay here. And to do that, it needs to be affordable for us to stay here.” http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/17/us/in-maine-local-control-is-a-luxury-fewer-towns-can-afford.html?smid=fb-nytimes&smtyp=cur&_r=0
  4. http://www.smart-magazine.com/en/jan-gehl-architect-interview/ Jan_Gehl_Portrait The city whisperer Portrait 3 minutes read - Oliver Herwig on November 3rd, 2015 Jan Gehl champions something that few architects have mastered: cities for people. The Dane favors compact neighborhoods over grand master plans. The 79-year-old city planner values the wishes of residents over architecture. And his resounding success proves him right. Ssssshhhhhrrrrr. In the background, a cordless screwdriver buzzes away. Jan Gehl apologizes for the distraction; “Excuse me, they’re doing some work in the kitchen.” Life is quite busy for the professor emeritus and city planner. As a city planner, Gehl‘s detail orientation and screw-tightening skills come in handy wherever mayors or councilors realize that something needs to change. Over the past few years, they have been beating a path to his door: Gehl is considered a top global expert on humane cities. “I’m an idealist,” states the 79-year-old. “And the projects I’m working on are all about creating better environments for pedestrians and public life.” To Gehl, both of these are intrinsically linked – people should be able to experience their city on foot. He goes on to scoff that we know more about the perfect habitat for Siberian tigers than a good environment for people. His wife Ingrid and he started out studying life in the cities – and then traveled to Italy on a grant in 1965. In 1971, “Livet mellem husene,” life between buildings, was the first result of their studies between streets and squares – and turned out to be quite a flop. Yet Gehl labored on and continued to hone and develop his methods over the years, by then a professor at the Royal Danish Academy of Arts. Jan Gehl Brighton “My projects are all about creating better environments for pedestrians”. Photo: Gehl Architects Gehl’s foremost success is Copenhagen Today, his successes prove him right. And the standout example is Copenhagen – the city of Gehl’s alma mater, teaching career, and a company he co-founded. In a way, it serves as an open-air lab for his ideas: All the way back in 1965, the city – advised by Gehl – created Europe’s longest pedestrian zone, the Strøget. Copenhagen has become a template for the fundamental shift from post war car-centric cities to more pedestrian-friendly 21st century metropolises. “In order to reclaim a human dimension, city planners need to re-evaluate the many capacity-friendly ideas,” he states in the recently released “Cities for People”. This means: Our cities are filled with too many traffic lights, narrow sidewalks, and multi-lane highways that squeeze in pedestrians and force them to cross streets in a rush. According to Gehl, that’s not a given: “There is a good, pedestrian-friendly solution for any traffic planning issue.” And he adds that “it is high time to revisit our priorities.” To this end, Gehl has introduced a check list of small changes that – taken together – produce great results. He favors “polite reminders” (as in Copenhagen) over flashing traffic lights that “encourage hasty crossings” (as in New York City). Gloomy pedestrian underpasses (like the one near Zurich’s train station) should be replaced by sunlit “zebra crossings at street level.” Copenhagen stroget Jan Gehl Advised by Gehl, Copenhagen installed Europe’s longest pedestrian zone, the Strøget. Photo: Yadid Levy / Getty Images From New York City to Shanghai: a globally sought-after urban consultant Gehl knows cities better than most. Paraphrasing a well-known analogy, some people are good with horses and become horse whisperers, while others are good with people. The latter usually become doctors, nurses, or priests. As a city planner, Jan Gehl is a little bit of all. First and foremost, however, he is a self-professed “missionary.” He preaches human scale development and has been consulting for cities around the world for years, helping them to redesign entire neighborhoods to benefit their residents. The formula is simple: go to the city, observe, and listen. And then join together to effect change. A fun video on his website tells the story behind it all. It took the love of developmental psychologist Ingrid to open the builder’s eyes: Architecture should serve people. In this spirit, Jan Gehl draws on insights by sociologists and psychologists to turn ivory tower planning into bona fide collaborations. The Herald Square before Jan Gehl The Herald Square in New York City before … Photo: DOT The Herald Square after Jan Gehl … and after Gehl Architects. Photo: DOT Gehl’s top priority: the human scale His drive really picked up in 2000 when Gehl and Helle Søholt, a former student, joined forces to found the company Gehl Architects. Maybe, it’s all just a question of scale. Modernism delighted in completely redesigning metropolises or conjuring up abstract plans on the drawing board. Builders like Le Corbusier, who considered rented dwellings “housing units” or “living machines,” liked to subdivide cities by function. This is a kind of thinking Gehl would like to leave behind. The architect is less interested in models and buildings than in their residents. Over the years, Gehl came up with a range of basic principles that support and define thriving communities around the world. One of these rules might be not to build skyscrapers since six or more levels up residents lose touch with the street and feel removed from it all. Or: consider the ground floor. It shouldn’t be uniform or forbidding, but varied and full of surprises. MarDelPlata Jan Gehl Gehl’s formula is simple: … Photo: Municipality of Mar del Plata Mar Del Plata Jan Gehl … go to the city, observe, and listen. Photo: Municipality of Mar del Plata “Better city spaces, more city life“ Nowadays, Gehl provides coaching for cities like New York City, Shanghai, Singapore, St. Petersburg, or Almaty. And his insights sound so simple, matter of fact, and even trivial that it can be hard to fathom how our modern cities, divided by functions, could ever have forgotten these wisdoms. “Better city spaces, more city life,” one of his premises states. High quality spaces encourage leisure activities and interactions. “It’s so obvious, we have simply overlooked it.” P.S. The interview was conducted over an old telephone on the fifth floor of a building in the center of Munich. Sao Paulo Jan Gehl “Better city spaces, more city life.“ Phpto: Luis E. S. Brettas Header image: Sandra Henningsson / Rights Gehl Architects sent via Tapatalk
  5. Nom: 30 St-Jacques Hauteur (étages): 11 étages Hauteur (mètres): TBD Coût du projet: TBD Promoteur: Dev McGill Emplacement Début de construction: TBD Site internet: http://www.devmcgill.com/fr/30-st-jacques-place-d-armes Infos:Cette magnifique image panoramique de la Place d’Armes n’est pas un montage, c’est la réalité et vous pourriez un jour habiter tout juste à côté… Nous sommes fiers de vous annoncer que le promoteur DevMcGill et ses partenaires ont remporté un concours public de la Ville de Montréal leur permettant de donner vie à un nouveau projet de condominiums très attendu, le 30 St-Jacques. Situé sur l’un des très rares terrains vacants et développables du Vieux-Montréal, le 30 St-Jacques est voisin de la Place d’Armes, un secteur qui figure parmi les plus remarquables en Amérique du Nord grâce à son architecture. Environ 150 nouvelles résidences, dotées de commodités enviables, sont prévues sur ce site convoité depuis des années par de nombreux promoteurs. À un coin de rue de la station de Métro Place d’Armes et d’un accès à la ville souterraine de Montréal (RÉSO), les futurs résidents de cette copropriété pourront se rendre sans voiture et à l’abri des intempéries, à des milliers de commerces, services et entreprises. Il s’agit là d’un des rares développements de condominiums de Montréal à s’être vu accorder une note parfaite, soit de 100 %, sur le site Web indépendant « WalkScore.com ». Ce dernier compare l’arrondissement à un réel paradis pour le piéton.
  6. (Courtesy of The Montreal Gazette) This is the first part of three. Plus you get more visuals in the paper today.
  7. IluvMTL

    Satisfaction by city - Stats Can

    STATISTICS CANADA April 20, 2015 1:34 pm People in Vancouver and Toronto least satisfied with their lives: StatsCan Man under umbrella in Vancouver Vancouverites report being less satisfied with their lives than residents of other Canadian cities, according to Statistics Canada. Maybe it's the rain? Jonathan Hayward / The Canadian Press Residents of Vancouver and Toronto report being less satisfied with their lives than people in other Canadian metropolitan areas, according to a new study published by Statistics Canada. Researchers asked the residents of various census metropolitan areas to rank their overall life satisfaction on a scale of 0 to 10, where 0 was “very dissatisfied” and 10 was “very satisfied.” In Vancouver, the average score was 7.808, followed closely by Toronto at 7.818. People living in Canada’s most-satisfied metropolitan area, Saguenay, gave an average score of 8.245 out of 10. The differences are larger when you look at the percentage of people who rate their life satisfaction as a 9 or 10 out of 10. In Sudbury, 44.9 per cent of residents ranked their overall life satisfaction that high. In Vancouver, it was only 33.6 per cent. When it comes to people who were comparatively unsatisfied with their lives – giving themselves a score of only 6 or less, there are again significant differences between cities. 17.1 per cent of people in Windsor, Toronto and Abbotsford-Mission ranked their life satisfaction at a 6 or less. Only 8.6 per cent of people in Saguenay gave themselves such a low score. To figure out what accounts for the differences, researchers tested various hypotheses. They found that people who are married or are in good health tend to rank their life satisfaction much higher than others. Unemployed people are more likely to have low satisfaction, and richer people higher satisfaction. However, the report states, these personal factors don’t seem to account entirely for the variation across metropolitan areas. The researchers note that smaller communities with a population of less than 250,000 tend to report higher average life satisfaction. Also, when sorted by city size, metropolitan areas in Quebec tend to be at the top of the list: Montrealers are the most satisfied among individuals in Canada’s big cities and most likely to report life satisfaction of 8 or higher, Sherbrooke and Quebec are at the top of the mid-size communities, and Saguenay and Trois-Rivières at the top of the smaller metropolitan areas, according to the study. Although the Statistics Canada researchers don’t definitively say why this is, they point to other research that suggests levels of trust and social connections in local communities have an effect on people’s life satisfaction, as does income relative to one’s neighbours and economic inequality. sent via Tapatalk
  8. very depressing. http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/69d8aefa-95a7-11e4-a390-00144feabdc0.html#axzz3RFvv7YUu The Fast Lane: A premier city now second among equals Tyler BruleTyler Brûlé Montreal was Canada’s leading lady. The view last Saturday couldn’t have been more different S econd cities are always curious affairs. Often chippy, occasionally unassuming and always striving to be that little bit more distinct, quirky or boisterous than the comfy cousin who holds premier status on the international stage. Melbourne likes to trade on its Europeaness, seasons and liveability compared with Sydney’s beaches and overused Opera House. Residents of Osaka are loud and good-humoured, while Tokyoites are seen as too precious and concerned with protocol. Mancunians need to remind you of their industrial glory days, football teams and increasingly well-connected airport versus the gridlock of London. Second cities that used to hold the number one position are even stranger, particularly when their fall has been largely of their own making. Last weekend I returned to Montreal for the first time in about four years and the drive from the airport to downtown was a bittersweet journey along a route that used to dazzle in the early 1970s. Back then, the low-slung offices and factories lining the highway into the city carried the names of global brands and Canada’s industrial powerhouses. Downtown, skyscrapers and buildings from the turn of the 20th century carried the brass plaques of important banks and insurance companies. Montreal was Canada’s leading lady, the young nation’s port of first impressions. It had hosted a World Expo in 1967 and was about to run up a shameful debt in the form of the 1976 Summer Olympics. The view last Saturday couldn’t have been more different. Rather than the familiar logos, the words that dominated every other façade, in a variety of pleading fonts, was “à louer” (to rent), and these signs stretched from the perimeter fence of the airport all the way to the buildings around my hotel on the once elegant Sherbrooke Street. A plague of rental and for sale signs is generally a good indicator that things are not going quite to plan, whereas a skyline dotted with cranes and scaffolding (in Canada’s case, Toronto), suggests the opposite. Derelict office buildings and boarded-up restaurants aside, many would argue it’s all gone to plan, and Montreal has become a shining light of diversity and French culture in an otherwise Anglo continent. Businesses must answer the phone in French first; multinationals must spend tens of millions reimagining their brands in order not to fall foul of the province’s language police (Starbucks Coffee must have the prefix Café, should people miss what it does. This isn’t the case even in France); and then there are all the other quirky laws that ensure the province of Quebec maintains its special status at vast expense while its infrastructure is crumbling. When Quebec passed its radical language laws in the 1970s and hundreds of thousands of long-time residents headed for the Ontario border, there were many who thought this heavy-handed attempt at language preservation wouldn’t last. Yet Canada’s number two city continues to suffer a serious brain-drain, and even young francophones are becoming vocal about the province’s outmoded world view. For the moment Montreal remains an interesting place because a depressed economy allows creativity to flourish (think Berlin) as low rents mean it’s easier to try out a new retail concept or launch a restaurant. Having done two tours of duty in Montreal (1972-77 and 1980-83), I enjoyed the positive friction that came from Anglo-French sparring and the cosmopolitan flavour it cast over the city. More than 30 years later, the whole concept of language “rules” in an increasingly mobile world is simply unproductive. A recent piece in a Montreal daily politely argued that the city’s problems were related to manufacturing moving overseas and poorly integrated logistics while failing to even aim a dart at the elephant in the room. Multilingualism is a fine concept but it should not be imposed upon long-time residents, new arrivals or businesses seeking to invest — particularly when in Canada there’s another, more widely spoken language.
  9. IluvMTL

    Winter Cities - Villes Hivernales

    http://www.wintercities.com/ On Facebook https://www.facebook.com/WinterCitiesInstitute Those who live and work in northern cities recognize the need for better planning and design. The sustainability of winter cities requires a creative approach that addresses the problems of snow and cold while enhancing the advantages, opportunities and beauty of the winter season. A positive approach benefits the attitudes of residents, and bolsters the community’s ability to attract new business and residents. The Winter Cities Institute was organized in 2008 to identify, promote and share the positive attributes of winter living, new concepts in architecture and urban design, and success stories from those places that are thriving in the north. The Institute was founded by Patrick Coleman, AICP, recognized for his work with the Livable Winter Cities Association (WCA). From 1982-2005, the WCA organized conferences, published books and the quarterly magazine “Winter Cities”. A totally volunteer staff made the WCA difficult to sustain and in the end it struggled with its mission. As Coleman incorporated winter enhancement strategies in his planning practice with multi-disciplinary design firms in Alaska and northern Michigan, he found enthusiastic reception to the idea of making winter a better time of year. “People are looking for answers to common winter problems and issues”, he said. “I experienced firsthand and heard from many the need for a source of information, networking and resources, and decided to launch the Institute as a web-based network and resource sharing project”. The Winter Cites Institute offers a place for those looking to improve the quality of life in wintertime and need information on what is being done in other northern places. Our members are from around the world and include: cities and towns architects planners engineers parks and recreation professionals economic development and tourism officials Welcome to the resources available on this site and consider joining the network to get even more benefits.
  10. #12 - Montreal (Courtesy of GOOD) Read more The 50 cities they selected are quite interesting; #1 Hong Kong, #2 Johannesburg and #3 Mexico City.
  11. Radio-Canada fait une série de reportages sur les stéréotypes de différents quartiers de Montréal Le premier parle des bobos du Plateau : Les bobos du Plateau existent, en voici la preuve Mise à jour le mercredi 29 octobre 2014 à 16 h 13 HAE Montréal traîne son lot de clichés, mais sont-ils tous vrais? Dans ce premier article d'une série sur les stéréotypes revus et corrigés de la métropole, nous décortiquons l'un des plus souvent cités : les bobos du Plateau. (voir les cartes interactives sur le site) Une chronique de Pasquale Harrison-Julien Bobo : nom et adj. « Personne d'un milieu aisé, jeune et cultivée, qui recherche des valeurs authentiques, la créativité. Acronyme : bourgeois bohème. » C'est ainsi que Le Petit Robert définit le bobo. À Télé-Québec, ils étaient incarnés par le couple fictif formé par Anne Dorval et Marc Labrèche. Et si l'on plonge dans les données statistiques sur l'éducation, l'emploi, l'état civil, la religion et l'âge, on constate que dans la réalité, ils habitent majoritairement sur le Plateau-Mont-Royal. 1. Un quartier jeune? L'âge médian du résident du Plateau est de 34,1 ans. C'est le plus bas sur l'île de Montréal. C'est aussi l'arrondissement avec le plus fort pourcentage de personnes âgées de 25 à 29 ans, ainsi que de 30 à 34 ans. L'endroit où l'âge médian est le plus élevé sur l'île? Senneville (47,4 ans). 2. Un quartier d'artistes? C'est sur le Plateau-Mont-Royal qu'on retrouve le plus de personnes qui travaillent dans le milieu des arts, de la culture, des sports et des loisirs, soit 9015 personnes - comme l'indique la carte. Cela représente environ un résident sur sept. C'est plus que son plus proche concurrent, son voisin, Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie, où habitent 6590 travailleurs de ce secteur. Pour cette série, nous avons utilisé l'Annuaire statistique de l'agglomération de Montréal, publié par l'équipe de Montréal en statistiques, de la Ville de Montréal. Ce document analyse des données tirées du recensement de 2011 et de l'enquête nationale auprès des ménages de 2011. 3. Un quartier d'universitaires? Plus d'un résident sur deux du Plateau possède un diplôme universitaire, soit 44 085 personnes. Seul l'arrondissement de Côte-des-Neige-Notre-Dame-de-Grâce a un nombre plus élevé de diplômés : presque 10 000 personnes de plus, à 55 155 personnes, mais dans une proportion moindre (40,7 %). En termes de pourcentage, Westmount, Mont-Royal et Outremont ont les plus grandes proportions de diplômés universitaires sur l'île. 4. Un quartier de cyclistes et de piétons? Le stéréotype du résident du Plateau qui se rend à vélo ou à pied pour travailler semble se confirmer : cela représente 33,7 % des gens de cet arrondissement. Le Plateau éclipse tous les autres arrondissements pour l'utilisation du vélo : 6125 personnes, soit 11,6 % de l'arrondissement. C'est deux fois plus qu'Outremont, le second dans cette catégorie. Ils sont aussi les plus nombreux à Montréal à marcher : 11 710 personnes. En pourcentage toutefois, Ville-Marie est proportionnellement plus adepte de la marche pour se rendre au boulot (27,8 % comparativement à 22,1 % pour le Plateau). Toutes proportions gardées, les résidents de Pierrefonds-Roxboro sont ceux qui utilisent le moins la marche et le vélo pour aller au travail. 5. Un quartier de célibataires? Le mariage n'a pas la cote sur le plateau : l'arrondissement compte 50,1 % de célibataires et 21 % de personnes en union libre. En nombre, c'est toutefois dans Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie que les célibataires sont les plus nombreux. Dans le coin opposé : Côte-Saint-Luc, où moins du quart de ses résidents sont célibataires et à peine 3,3 % vivent en union libre. On peut aussi observer sur la carte une profonde différence entre l'Est ou l'Ouest. 6. Un quartier peu religieux? Côté foi, 38 980 résidents du Plateau disent n'avoir aucune religion, soit 39,7 % des résidents de l'arrondissement. En proportion suivent Ville-Marie (30,3 %) et Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie (25,9 %). L'arrondissement le moins athée? Saint-Léonard (7,1 %). Bobo pour toujours? Le Plateau n'a pas toujours été un quartier bobo, comme le rappelle l'urbaniste Daniel Gill. Et à l'avenir, son visage pourrait continuer d'évoluer. « Il y a un désir de partager des lieux communs avec des gens qui ont le même mode de vie. Historiquement, la création de l'UQAM a attiré des universitaires sur le Plateau. Les petits appartements d'ouvriers correspondaient aussi aux besoins des gens célibataires. »— Daniel Gill, professeur à l'Institut d'urbanisme de l'Université de Montréal. Les changements de population dans les quartiers prennent du temps à se produire. Ce qui ne veut pas dire que le Plateau sera le fief des bobos pour toujours. « Certains le trouvent déjà ringard. De nouvelles générations, plus jeunes, pourraient décider de s'installer ailleurs comme dans Villeray, Rosemont ou Griffintown », remarque Daniel Gill. Demain : L'Ouest riche, l'Est pauvre? Nous décortiquons les chiffres.
  12. GDS

    Résidence Jazz Phase 2

    Le jeudi 9 octobre 2014, en présence de la mairesse de la Ville de Longueuil, Madame Caroline St-Hilaire, de Madame France Dubé, conseillère à la Ville de Longueuil, de Monsieur Mathieu Duguay, président Société de gestion Cogir, de l’équipe de Jazz Longueuil, des cadres de Société de gestion Cogir et des résidents de Jazz Longueuil, se tenait la cérémonie de pelletée de terre protocolaire marquant le début de la construction de la tour II de la résidence privée pour aînés JAZZ Longueuil. Du même coup, la capsule temporelle contenant divers objets et souvenirs des résidents actuels de Jazz Longueuil a été scellée officiellement. Cette capsule sera installée dans la structure de béton de la tour II avec à son bord, à tout jamais, une petite partie de l'âme des résidents de la phase I. Résidence importante située au cœur de Longueuil, Jazz Longueuil s’agrandit pour accueillir une clientèle d’aînés autonomes de l’agglomération et ses environs. En plus d’offrir plus de 180 nouveaux logements au look contemporain, cette nouvelle résidence offrira des services à valeurs ajoutées à sa clientèle existante et future. Ce projet d’agrandissement, nécessitant un investissement de près de 30 millions de dollars, créera jusqu’à 26 nouveaux emplois. Située face à l’Hôpital Pierre-Boucher et à proximité de tous les services, la résidence Jazz Longueuil était louée à pleine capacité depuis quelques années. L’ajout de la tour II permettra d’offrir des opportunités de location à plusieurs aînés de la grande région qui désirent goûter à l’expérience Jazz. La construction de cette nouvelle tour sera réalisée entièrement par Société de gestion Cogir, l’un des plus importants gestionnaires d’immeubles au Québec. http://www.jazzlongueuil.ca ----
  13. http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/montreal/Number+Quebecers+leaving+province+rise/9360879/story.html BY MARIAN SCOTT, THE GAZETTE JANUARY 7, 2014 8:05 PM A total of 28,439 people moved from Quebec to another province from January to September 2013. In most cases, Quebec’s loss was Ontario’s gain, with two out of three ex-Quebecers moving to Ontario. Photograph by: Peter Redman , National Post MONTREAL - The number of Quebecers heading down the 401 is on the rise, partial statistics for 2013 suggest. Departures from Quebec to other provinces rose to their highest level this century in the first nine months of 2013, according to the Canadian Institute for Identities and Migration. Statistics are not available yet for the final three months of the year. A total of 28,439 people moved from Quebec to another province from January to September 2013 — the highest number of departures for that period in any year since 2000. In most cases, Quebec’s loss was Ontario’s gain, with two out of three ex-Quebecers moving to Ontario, one in four to Alberta and just under one in ten to British Columbia, according to quarterly demographic estimates released by Statistics Canada in December. Quebec had a net loss of 11,887 residents due to interprovincial migration (departures minus arrivals) in the 12 months from October 2012 to September 2013, compared to a loss of 7,700 people in the corresponding period of 2011-12 and a loss of 4,394 in 2010-11. The rise in departures corresponds with the election of the Parti Québécois in September 2012 — but there is no evidence the political situation is a contributing factor, said Jack Jedwab, the institute’s executive vice-president.“It’s too early to say,” he said. “I would argue it’s more about our economy,” Jedwab said. “These numbers have a very recessionary look to them, at a time when we’re not in a recession.” Jedwab said the loss of residents sounds a warning signal. “Significant population losses have a negative effect on our economy,” he said. The rise in out-migration is not related to the divisive debate over the PQ government’s proposed charter of values, Jedwab said, since the departures occurred before the charter was unveiled. A National Assembly committee will commence hearings on the charter Jan. 14. But Jedwab said if the trend continues, the hypothesis that political angst is spurring departures would deserve a second look. “If it persists into the next quarter, we’ve got to start thinking non-economic considerations are at work here,” he said. The PQ government’s focus on identity issues has decreased the comfort level of some members of cultural minorities, particularly the values charter, which proposes to bar all public sector workers from wearing religious garb like the Muslim head scarf, Jewish skullcap or Sikh turban. In September, an Ontario hospital published recruitment ads aimed to capitalize on the controversy. A photo of a female health worker wearing a hijab (head scarf) bore the caption: “We don’t care what’s on your head. We care what’s in it.” Aaron Lazarus, director of communications at Lakeridge Health in Bowmanville, Ont., east of Toronto, said the hospital received several job applications from doctors, nurses and other health professionals from Quebec in response to the ads. But Michel Leblanc, president and CEO of the Montreal Board of Trade, warned against jumping to the conclusion that the current political climate could be causing people to leave Quebec. “What is worrisome is that we have a net loss of residents every year,” Leblanc said. “People have a tendency to migrate not only to places with better weather, but also to places where the economy is performing better,” he said. Leblanc said that while the recent increase in departures is cause for concern, it is much smaller than the massive exodus of anglophones from Quebec in the 1970s and ’80s. He called on the government to improve the integration of immigrants into the workforce and to lower taxation to retain residents. Statistics Canada’s quarterly demographic estimates showed Alberta — with a population of 4,060,700 in October 2013 — continues to lead the provinces in population growth, adding 137,703 new residents from October 2012 to September 2013, of whom 49,031 moved there from elsewhere in Canada. Ontario (population 13,585,900) had slower population growth, gaining 128,442 new residents from October 2012 to September 2013. Quebec, numbering 8,174,500 residents, added 67,385 new residents from October 2012 to September 2013, with immigration and the natural increase of the population compensating for out-migration. Previous studies have shown that about two-thirds of Quebec residents who move to other provinces are allophones — people whose first language is neither French nor English. mascot@montrealgazette.com
  14. Merci à MTLskyline sur SSP Developer’s third design for riverside condo project up for approval http://westislandgazette.com/news/st...-for-approval/ Cheryl Cornacchia | From The Gazette | June 25, 2013 Other News Preliminary approval has been granted to a Montreal developer who wants to build a condominium complex in Pierrefonds-Roxboro alongside the Maison Joseph Théorêt and facing Rivière des Prairies. At a special borough council meeting June 19, council unanimously adopted a draft bylaw to rezone three lots on Gouin Blvd. at Aumais St. so that the Vered Group could build a 115-unit, six-story condominium alongside the heritage home recognized by Montreal’s Conseil de Patrimoine. The draft bylaw is now expected to come up for a second vote at another special borough council meeting, August 5, at which point, if passed, the bylaw would pave the way for the project could to go forward, at least, in theory. On Tuesday, André Giguere said he and other neighbours of the proposed project plan to request the borough open a register that could in effect tie up, if not halt, the condo project entirely, should sufficient number of neighbours sign it and signal their opposition to the project. Johanne Palladini, a borough spokesperson said on Tuesday once a register is opened, area residents would be given a specified day to sign it. If the project is opposed by a certain percentage of area residents, determined by the number of electoral voters, Palladini said, the borough would be forced to hold a costly, borough-wide referendum on the project. http://westislandgazette.com/news/story/2013/06/17/developers-third-design-for-riverside-condo-project-up-for-approval/
  15. MartinMtl

    Immigration in Canada by the numbers

    Source: Montreal Gazette Immigration in Canada by the numbers By Kirsten Smith, Postmedia News The proportion of foreign-born population in G8 countries and Australia (reported statistically) Japan — 1.0 per cent (2000) Italy — 8.0 per cent (2009) Russia — 8.2 per cent (2002) France — 8.6 per cent (2008) United Kingdom — 11.5 per cent (2010) United States — 12.9 per cent (2010) Germany — 13 per cent (2010) Canada — 20.6 per cent (2011) Australia — 26.8 per cent (2010) Recent immigration (2006 to 2011) Canada — 1.2 million Toronto — 381,745 Montreal — 189,730 Vancouver — 155,125 Calgary — 70,700 Edmonton — 49,930 Winnipeg — 45,270 Ottawa-Gatineau — 40,420 Saskatoon — 11,465 Windsor — 9,225 Regina — 8,150 The make-up of first-, second- and third-generation immigrants compared to total population: First generation (born outside Canada): 7.2 million or 22 per cent Of them: • 93.3 per cent immigrants • 4.9 per cent foreign students and foreign workers • 87,400 were born outside Canada to parents who are Canadian Second generation (born in Canada but at least one parent was born abroad): 5.7 million or 17.4 per cent • 54.8 per cent said both their parents were born outside Canada • B.C. was home to the most second generation residents 23.4 per cent • 3 in 10 second-generation residents were a visible minority Third generation (born in Canada, both parents also born in Canada): 19.9 million or 60.7 per cent Read more: http://www.canada.com/Immigration+Canada+numbers/8354135/story.html#ixzz2SiAN7sP2
  16. Emplacement exceptionnel sur l'avenue Victoria Design contemporain, style urbain, espace épuré Immeuble de 4 étages avec stationnement intérieur disponible Stationement extérieur pour les résidents et visiteurs Ascenseur Toit terrasse communautaire Système de caméras intérieur et extérieur sur DVR Intercom avec caméra de l'entrée Condominiums 3 1/2- 4 1/2- 5 1/2 Construction et produits de qualité supérieur Fenestration abondante Insonorisation supérieur dans les planchers et murs mitoyen Vue sur le parc le Limousin de St-Lambert et la ville de Montréal Zone de lavage auto avec aspirateur au garage pour les résidents Immeuble avec le service de Gaz Métro Système de chauffage centrale indépendant pour chaque condominium http://www.pururbain.com//pururbain_2/projet
  17. GDS

    Ventura

    http://venturacondos.ca/fr/ Ventura est un projet de condos urbains situés dans un environnement de banlieue dynamique au cœur du centre-ville du « West Island », en face du centre commercial Fairview, ces unités sont modernes et à l’affut des tendances actuelles, ce village urbain va au-devant de tous les besoins des résidents en leur offrant tous les services à quelques pas seulement. Les futurs résidents auront la chance d’y découvrir un milieu de vie qui répond aux besoins d’une clientèle variée et active.
  18. (Courtesy of The Montreal Gazette) Congrats Vaudreuil-Dorion, I guess good old Santa is giving you good news for the holidays.
  19. ProposMontréal

    Juste au Québec?

    Y'a juste au Québec que ces choses la arrive? Source OTTAWA, Ont. - The eastbound 174 between Montreal Road and Jeanne D'Arc Blvd. will likely be closed for days, as city crews work at fixing a massive sinkhole. The huge pit on the off-ramp at Jeanne D'Arc swallowed a car Tuesday afternoon, the vehicle coming to rest on a corroded sewer line. Orleans councillor Bob Monette told 1310News crews first need to figure out how to get the car out of the hole. Then city officials need to find the right sized pipe to replace the damaged sewer line. "If they can get the 3.6 metre pipe, then it will be a matter of days before it's replaced and the road reopened," Monette said, adding that as a driver who uses the 174 on a daily basis, he understands the frustration of Orleans residents. "That's the highest traveled roadway in our community. Everyone travels the 174 to get to and from Orleans." This section of pipeline was inspected and cleared in 2011, and Monette told 1310News he's looking into what caused the pipe to burst now. In the meantime, he recommended that Orleans residents take the bus or try carpooling on alternate routes like Innes Road or St Joseph Blvd.
  20. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/18/business/global/hip-cities-that-think-about-how-they-work.html?pagewanted=1&_r=2&smid=fb-share The story of young people, full of ambition, energy, skill and talent, moving to enticing cities that call to them like a siren’s song is as old as modern civilization. And in a world where national borders are easier to traverse, where more countries are joining the prosperous global middle class and where the cost of a one-way plane ticket is more affordable, young professionals probably have more cities to choose from than ever before. This survey is not based solely on quality of life, number of trees or the cost of a month’s rent. Instead, we examine some cities that aim to be both smart and well managed, yet have an undeniably hip vibe. Our pick of cities that are, in a phrase, both great and good: Auckland With its beaches, inlets and lush coastal climate, the Kiwi metropolis has always had great natural beauty going for it (and, now, for the first time in 24 years, it is the home to the World Cup Rugby Champions). But we digress. Currently counting 1.5 million residents , the government is projecting the city to hit the two million-mark in just 30 years. The city has recently voted to create a new central core that mixes sustainable housing and mixed-use development. The public transportation system, which includes subways, trams, busses and ferries, is constantly being expanded. Measures to increase the density of the urban landscape, meant to ultimately prevent encroachment on surrounding lands, as well as planting “green carpets” along urban roads demonstrate a keen eye toward creating a greener future. Plus, the city is expanding its free Wi-Fi coverage, according to a city official. Auckland is doing its best to “up their game with urban design,” said Angela Jones, a spokesperson for the city, turning a beautiful but provincial capital into a smart city. Berlin This culture capital combines low rents, a white-hot arts scene, good public transportation and myriad creative types — from media to design to technology — from all over the world. Known as Europe’s largest construction zone for at least 10 of the past 20 years, 4.4-million-strong Berlin has probably changed more in that time than any other large European city. And while the restaurants have become more expensive, the clothes are now more stylish and the D.J.’s have added more attitude, there is still plenty of real city left to be discovered by the thousands of artists and young professionals who move here every year to make this the pulsing center of Germany, the powerhouse of Europe. Besides radical renovations to the government center, main train station and the old Potsdamer Platz, the city recently turned a historic airport in its heart into a vast urban park. A short-term bike-rental system is in place and the old subway system, reunited after the fall of the wall, like the city itself, is as efficient as ever. Besides artists and bohemians looking for the vibe, the city — home to several prestigious universities, research institutes and many a company headquarter — is brimming with smart scientists and savvy businessmen. Barcelona Anyone who has walked down Las Ramblas on a summer evening or has stared at the Sagrada Familia for long enough understands why this city attracts planeloads of tourists. Music, good food, great weather and strong technology and service sectors compete to make this city of 1.6 million a home for all those who want to stay beyond summer break. If all the traditional charms of Barcelona were not enough, an active city government is trying to keep this city smart, too. Under its auspices, photovoltaic solar cells have been installed on many public and private rooftops. Charging stations for electrical cars and scooters have recently been set up around the city, in preparation for the day when residents will be tooling around in their electric vehicles. A biomass processing plant is being built that will use the detritus from city parks to generate heat and electricity, and free Wi-Fi is available at hotspots around the city. Cape Town Wedged between sea and mountain, Cape Town’s natural setting is stunning. Nor does the city — with its colorful neighborhoods, historic sites, and easy charm — disappoint. And while its one of Africa’s top tourist destinations, it also attracts many new residents from around the globe. The local government is trying to lead the growing city of 3.5 million with a more inclusive government and development structure, to overcome the gross inequities of South Africa’s past. Four major universities and many research institutes make Cape Town one of the continent’s bustling research centers. Named the 2014 World Design Capital last month, the city government is encouraging a cluster of design and creative firms in a neighborhood called the Fringe. The 2010 World Cup of soccer was a boon for infrastructure, especially public transportation. A new bus system, with dedicated lanes, has been rolled out in recent years to keep the many suburbs connected and alleviate crushing traffic. Under a program called Smart Cape, libraries and civic centers have computer terminals with free Internet access. Poverty and crime are still issues in Cape Town, but overall quality of life indicators rank the city as one of the best in Africa. Copenhagen Progressive, cozy and very beautiful, the young and the elegant flock to this northern light. Rents might not be as low as in other hip cities, but the social infrastructure in this metropolitan area of 1.9 million cannot be beat. Offering a prosperous blend of art, culture and scene, this highly tolerant city is attracting young professionals lucky enough to work in the center of Danish industry and commerce. A mix of stately old European buildings and modern, green-oriented architecture speaks of a city that treasures the old but loves experimenting with the new. Despite its cool Scandinavian climate, the Danish capital might just be the most bicycle-friendly city in the world. Bike superhighways crisscross the city, and statistics show that more than a third of the city’s inhabitants commute to work or school on their trusty two-wheelers. A metro system was inaugurated in the last decade for those who choose to go without. With sunlight-flooded underground stations and clean, driverless subway cars, the system looks more like a people-mover at an international airport than an urban transport system. Having committed itself to reducing carbon levels by 20 percent before 2015, some of the city’s power is generated by wind. The city has been so successful in cleaning up its once-industrial harbor that it has been able to open three public baths in a harbor waterway. Curitiba, Brazil One of the smartest cities in Latin America, Brazil’s wealthy regional capital attracts many new inhabitants with jobs in service and production sectors, and with the promise a functioning city. The 1.7 million residents have access to a bus-based rapid transport system so good that more than 700,000 commuters use it daily. Buses run on designated lanes that, because of a unique and modern urban design, have right-of-way and preferred access to the city center. A beautiful botanical garden and other city parks, along with other strong environmental measures, keep the air largely clear of pollution, despite Curitiba’s land-locked location. The city strives to be sustainable in other ways, too. According to reports, it recently invested $106 million, or 5 percent, of its budget into its department of environment. The city government makes itself integral in the lives of Curitibans, not just seeking comment and feedback on policies, but also organizing a host of events. “Bike Night” is the latest craze in the active city. Each Tuesday, residents take to their bikes and peddle through the night, accompanied by municipal staff members. Montreal With its hearty French and North American mix, this city of 3.6 million has a real soul thanks to low living costs and long winter evenings. And it is no slouch when it comes to good food, hip culture, well-appointed museums and efficient transportation. With four major universities and plenty of bars, the nightlife in this bilingual city has a well-deserved reputation. Because the winters tend to be long and cold, the city possesses an extensive underground network connecting several downtown malls and a subterranean arts quarter. When spring finally does arrive, and snow is cleared from the many bike paths, the city puts out its 3,000 short-term-rental bicycles, known as Bixi. City-sponsored community gardens are sprouting around town, giving urbanites a chance to flex their green thumb. Montreal is an incredibly active town where festivals celebrating everything from jazz to Formula One dominate the city’s calendar during the summer. Thanks to Mount Royal, a large central park and cemetery that serves as cross-country, snowshoe and ice-skating terrain in the winter and becomes a verdant picnic ground and gathering spot in the summer, Montrealers never have to leave city limits. Santiago A vibrant mix of Latin American culture and European sensibility, this Chilean city is modern, safe and smart. The rapidly growing city of 6.7 million — , which, perhaps surprisingly, was first subject to urban planning mandates in the mid-20th century — is still ahead of others in South America when it comes to urban governance. A law curtailing urban sprawl and protecting the few natural spaces close to the city is exemplary. Beautiful old cultural jewels like the library and fine art museum are dwarfed by serious commercial skyscrapers. The smell of local food, good and inexpensive, brings life even to the streets of its financial district. One of the most extensive public transport systems on the continent whisks more than 2.3 million commuters to and from work or school every day. Because of its high altitude, pollution is a problem — one that the national government is trying to curb with various green initiatives. Short-term bike rentals exist in one of the more active parts of town, and significant city funds have been used to construct bicycle lanes. For a city this modern, however, Santiago has few parks. But the ocean is just a short drive to west and the mountains to the east. Shanghai China’s commercial heart has grown tremendously in the past couple of decades. Attracting young professionals with its jobs and opportunities rather than with museums and hip nightlife, this megacity of 23 million is surprisingly smart. Its top-down urban planning approach is efficient in a city made up of separate 16 districts and one county. City coffers are put to use building enormously ambitious infrastructure, like a deepwater port, tunnels, bridges and roadways. A good indicator for the rapid and deliberate growth of the city is the metro system. First opened in 1995, it is now the world’s longest subway network, according to city officials. Adding a futuristic aspect to the utilitarian system is a Maglev (magnetic levitation) line that connects the airport to the city, and on which the train travels at speeds of up to 431 kilometers, or 268 miles, per hour. But Shanghai’s urban development is also green. The city claims that it put the equivalent of $8 billion into environmental improvement and cleanup, which include sewage treatment systems but also an impressive number of city parks. In addition, Shanghai has made its city government more accessible by running a Web site were residents can find municipal information, and read a blog entitled “mayor’s window.” Vilnius, Lithuania One of the greenest of the former Eastern bloc capitals, Vilnius has a forward-thinking city government. In a recent Internet video that spread virally, the mayor, Arturas Zuokas, is seen crushing a Mercedes parked on a bike path with a tank. Beyond the obvious political theater of the stunt, the city, whose metropolitan area population is 850,000 takes providing good public transportation seriously. A recent study suggested that some 70 percent of the capital’s citizens either walk, bike or take the bus. Vilnius, a verdant city that despite some communist architectural clunkers is charmingly medieval and surprisingly well maintained, boasts an old town that is a Unesco world heritage site. After the fall of the old regime, the city took great pains to retool its waste disposal systems, building a modern landfill in 2005. The capital attracts young professionals, and not just from Eastern Europe, who see in Vilnius a rising star in business and appreciate all that the extensive cultural scene in the little capital has to offer.
  21. http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/article/1230226--toronto-ers-feel-weight-of-downtown-condo-boom Sarah-Taïssir Bencharif Staff Reporter Anil Chopra can’t believe some of the things happening in his emergency departments’ waiting rooms. Or triage areas. They’re just too crowded. It’s clear to him where the surge of people comes from. “You just have to look outside your window,” says Chopra, head of emergency medicine at the University Health Network, which comprises four hospitals: Princess Margaret, Toronto Western, Toronto General and Toronto Rehab. “Toronto has a great reputation as being a condo king in North-America,” he says. Amidst the debate ignited by Deputy Mayor Doug Holyday over who should live in the city’s downtown core, Torontonians are wondering what services are available for the increasing number of people who do. Chopra and other doctors and hospital administrators say the rate at which downtown Toronto’s density is increasing is outpacing the area hospitals’ capacity and infrastructure. Both Toronto Western and Toronto General’s emergency departments have exceeded their capacities, with a combined total of more than 100,000 visits to the ER every year. “We do things I wouldn’t have imagined,” says Chopra. Nurses in his department started doing some therapies right in the triage area. Patients with IV drips are sitting in chairs — there aren’t enough beds. Chopra’s had to examine patients’ right in the waiting room, “knowing full well I’m in earshot of other people,” he says. “Otherwise, they will wait four more hours.” He doesn’t like saying it, but they’re just trying to survive. The city and province’s plans to curb urban sprawl have pushed development vertically with a multitude of condos sprouting up in the downtown core. While there are environmental and social benefits to building up, doctors say hospital infrastructure hasn’t been able to catch up. The emergency waiting rooms are getting as crowded as Toronto’s skyline. “We’re seeing a 5 to 10 per cent increase (in emergency room patients) year after year after year,” says Chopra. “It seems to be endless.” Planning for downtown urban growth can be challenging, says Sandeep Agrawal, professor of planning at Ryerson University. Usually, when planners prepare new subdivisions, they design and allocate services according to the planned density. “Downtown, it’s a bit the other way around, where the population has increased multiple folds and hospitals have to keep up with that,” he says. “Obviously they were not designed initially to cater to that density.” Agrawal is worried urban planners have forgotten their discipline’s original purpose which was to mitigate the spread of disease caused by living in close quarters. “City planning as a profession has moved far from health planning agencies with relatively little or no contact with health and health planning agencies,” he writes in an email. In downtown Toronto, the quarters are getting closer. The city’s population grew by almost 112,000 residents, a rise of 4.5 per cent between 2006 and 2011. That’s more than five times the growth reported in the previous five-year period, according to Statistics Canada. The city of Toronto’s website reports there are 132 high rises currently under construction. It’s the most out of any city in the world. The Ministry of Infrastructure’s plan for Toronto is to increase the density of residents and jobs in downtown Toronto to a minimum of 400 per hectare by 2031. That figure is already at 708 jobs and residents per hectare in Toronto Centre, according to MPP Glen Murray’s office. The downtown population boom has also put pressure on St. Michael’s Hospital. When its emergency department was built in 1983, it was designed to handle 45,000 patients a year. Today, that department annually sees more than 70,000 patients. That figure is growing alarmingly fast. “We’ve been going up 5 to 8 per cent a year over the last five years,” says Doug Sinclair, St. Mike’s executive vice-president and chief medical officer. He says there are likely other factors behind the rapid increase in the number of ER visits, but the increased downtown population is an important one. “The vast majority of patients who come to St. Mike’s are from the downtown area . . . most of the emergency department visits are local. We’re presuming it’s had an effect,” he says. It’s hard to beat the rush. Since securing government approval for a hospital revitalization project which will include a new 17-storey patient care tower, they’ve had to revise the emergency department’s size and resources to fit the new volume of patients. But it’s nearly impossible to really build for future projections. “We can design it for the number we have now or guesstimate a few thousand more, but clearly the government never wants to build something too big,” says Sinclair. Money is tight. The Ministry of Infrastructure sets its density forecasts and communicates them to other relevant ministries, like the Ministry of Health. The two are responsible for funding and building hospitals in the province. The Ministry of Health changed its funding model from an across-the-board increase to funding hospitals based on the services they deliver. This should provide funding that better matches each hospital’s changing population and needs, according to Tori Gass, spokesperson for the Ministry of Health. But emergency doctors like Chopra aren’t sure the new funding model or all the cost-saving strategies already in place will help them much. “I’m not that optimistic,” he says.
  22. Projet de maisons en rangée sur le terrain des anciens garages municipaux Sandrine Béjanin Informés par la Ville d'un nouveau projet majeur de construction résidentielle dans leur environnement immédiat, les Brossardois du secteur des anciens garages municipaux, situé dans le quartier B, se sont mobilisés contre un développement qu'ils estiment préjudiciable à leur qualité de vie. Le promoteur immobilier A.H. Inc. projette d'acheter à la Ville de Brossard le terrain des anciens «ateliers municipaux» afin d'y construire un ensemble à vocation résidentielle de 70 maisons en rangée, desservi par une nouvelle rue qui traversera le parc Baudelaire. Situé entre l'avenue Baudelaire et l'avenue Béliveau, et entre l'avenue Bienvenue et le croissant Balmoral, ce terrain, appartenant à la Ville, lui servait autrefois de garage pour ses véhicules. Clos, mais inutilisé depuis environ une quinzaine d'années, le terrain nécessite d'être décontaminé, ce que le promoteur propose de faire à ses frais. «Pour la Ville, c'est une belle occasion de se débarrasser de la patate chaude que constitue la contamination du terrain», invoquent Jules Béliveau et Frédéric Côté, deux résidents à l'origine de la pétition de 108 personnes se déclarant contre le projet. Outrés devant l'ampleur du projet, les signataires contestent surtout la hauteur des bâtiments de trois étages, qui risquent de priver les habitants de l'avenue Bienvenue et de la place Benoît de toute luminosité et toute intimité dans leur cour arrière. Leur souci s'étend aussi à l'augmentation connexe de la circulation automobile, de la surpopulation dans les écoles, et des îlots de chaleur dans le secteur, ainsi qu'à la suppression du terrain de basketball du parc Baudelaire. Devant l'opposition massive des citoyens, qui s'est manifestée lors d'une réunion d'information, le 22 juin dernier, la Ville a demandé au promoteur de revoir son projet et s'est engagée à présenter le nouveau projet aux citoyens lors d'une prochaine rencontre dont la date n'a pas encore été fixée. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Anciens ateliers municipaux : vive opposition à un projet immobilier. Texte Paul-André Gilbert Un nouveau projet immobilier sur le terrain des anciens ateliers municipaux de Brossard provoque de vives réactions chez des résidents du secteur B. Le groupe immobilier A.H. inc. prévoit construire sur ce terrain, situé à l’intersection des rues Baudelaire et Bienvenue, un projet de maisons unifamiliales en rangées, composé de 70 résidences. Jules Béliveau et Frédéric Côté, deux résidents du voisinage, s’opposent vivement à ce projet, qu’ils considèrent inapproprié pour plusieurs raisons. Premièrement, l’ajout de nouvelles résidences amènerait selon eux une multiplication du nombre de voitures dans les rues du secteur, qui sont déjà très achalandées. «La rue Baudelaire est devenue la décharge de l’autoroute 30. Ce n’est plus une rue, c’est un boulevard», explique M. Côté. Avec l’augmentation de la circulation, ce dernier, dont la résidence est adossée à l’ancien garage municipal, craint pour la sécurité de ses enfants et de ceux du voisinage, trois écoles primaires étant présentes dans le secteur. «J’essaie de voir le puzzle en terme de sécurité», s’inquiète-t-il. Hauteur des maisons MM. Béliveau et Côté sont également préoccupés par la hauteur des maisons du projet d’Immobilier A.H. Les résidences seraient en effet composées de bâtiments de trois à six unités de trois étages. Les deux résidents craignent pour l’harmonie architecturale du quartier, qui est composé en majorité de bungalows. Ils croient aussi que les résidences entraineront une diminution importante de l’intimité et de la luminosité pour les résidences qui jouxte le terrain. «Ça fait une muraille de Chine et ça coupe passablement l’horizon et la lumière», précise M. Béliveau. Il ajoute que toutes ces résidences vont créer un îlot de chaleur dans le secteur, qui était rafraîchi par le terrain vague. D’ailleurs, M. Béliveau propose que la Ville construise un parc sur ce terrain plutôt que des résidences. Terrain contaminé Un autre élément important cause une forte inquiétude chez MM. Côté et Béliveau : le terrain des ateliers municipaux serait selon eux fortement contaminé. Puisque le terrain était occupé par les ateliers municipaux de la Ville, on retrouverait dans le sol des hydrocarbures et d’autres substances toxiques qui proviennent de matériel qu’on retrouve généralement dans un garage municipal, comme de la peinture et des batteries. L’Administration municipale affirme être consciente de la présence de contaminants dans le sol. Cependant, le promoteur s’engage à décontaminer le terrain avant de construire les résidences. Le directeur des communications de la Ville de Brossard, Alain Gauthier, affirme que le promoteur a déjà effectué une décontamination par le passé et que cette décontamination sera validée par le ministère du Développement durable, de l’Environnement et des Parcs. De son côté, le promoteur Bernard Armand explique qu’il est conscient des réticences des résidents et que c’est pourquoi il essaie de moduler le projet dans le but qu’il soit fait de la manière la plus harmonieuse possible. Par exemple, la hauteur des bâtiments causant un problème, la compagnie Immobilier A.H. serait en train de revoir l’aspect architectural du projet. Il rappelle toutefois que le terrain est hautement contaminé. «On est prêt à regarder où on pourrait modifier le projet pour le rendre plus acceptable pour tous et chacun, mais il y a des limites», a-t-il conclu.