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  1. Situé au cœur du centre-ville de Montréal, ce nouveau projet est et à 2 minutes de l'Université McGill, 15 minutes de Concordia et autre cégeps et universités, et proche de plusieurs boutiques et restaurants. Nos suites/chambres incluent: Evo Sherbrooke vous offrent dans chaque suite un grand espace de rangement, une grande salle de bain privée, chaises et espaces confortable de travail. Nos tarifs débutent MAINTENANT à partir de 900$, tout ce dont vous avez besoins sous le même toit! Commodités: • Gym • Salle d'exercise (Yoga, Boxe, Zumba) • Salons d'études • Centre d'impression complet • Piscine intérieure chauffée • Salle de lavage • Aire de détente • Cabines de bronzage • Salles multimédia et jeux • Rangement vélo • Espaces de rangement additionnels • Sécurité 24h/24 • Entreposage vélo • Stockage supplémentaire disponible • Systèmes de sécurité sur place 24/7, caméras vidéos et serrures avec clavier à code integrée Voici les inclusions dans votre bail : Électricité, chauffage, eau, taxes, câble, internet sans fil . Accès privilégié à tous les évènements organisés par l'équipe EVO Réservez votre visite immédiatement en téléphonant au 1-855-535-0213 ________________________________________ NEW STUDENT LIVING IN MONTREAL Once a hotel, now converted into student living, evo Sherbrooke is located squarely in the heart of downtown Montreal; 2 minutes away from the McGill campus, a 15 minute walk to Concordia and a few blocks from Montreal's top attractions. Easy access to metro stations, buses and taxis as well as nearby grocery stores. What's included: evo Sherbrooke offers both single and double occupancy suites. Each unit includes a large closet, dresser, office desk, chair, double or king size bed and private washroom. Starting NOW at $1075, ALL INCLUSIVE. Amenities included: • Gym • Salle d'exercise (Yoga, Boxe, Zumba) • Salons d'études • Centre d'impression complet • Piscine intérieure chauffée • Salle de lavage • Aire de détente • Cabines de bronzage • Salles multimédia et jeux • Rangement vélo • Espaces de rangement additionnels • Sécurité 24h/24 What's included in Your Rent: The rent includes all utilities (electricity, heat, water and taxes), cable, wireless internet, and access to all amenities. Exclusive access to all community activities run by evo Sherbrooke. Book a visit now by calling 1-855-535-0213
  2. KPF wins planning approval for Gravesend riverside renewal project Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (London) have won planning approval for a new riverfront development to the north-west of Gravesend Town Centre that combines affordable housing, public amenity space and the restoration of Thames riverside heritage. Clifton Wharf will occupy two brownfield sites separated by West Street. The unique location includes a disused iron railway pier extending out into the Thames. KPF’s proposed re-development advances both the Kent and Medway Structure Plan and the Gravesham Local Plan by redressing the legacy of decline to the environment and infrastructure of this area. It will revitalise Gravesend town centre by bringing life into the neighbourhood though the creation of jobs and much needed accommodation. The scheme comprises 145 residential apartments, a retail unit and provisional river-related uses. The design overcomes the challenge of a split location by means of five sliced ellipsoidal buildings. Cutaway roofs allow for terraces at the top levels; punctuations in the wooden façades provide balconies for lower flats. The buildings, pebble-like in form, sit on a landscaped podium that stretches out in line with the pier. Every building in the cluster uses cutting edge morphology and careful positioning to maximise variety, giving the appearance of differing volumes and heights and taking advantage of the site’s access to unique views and natural light. KPF’s scheme restores the old iron pier and introduces steps and ramps to allow members of the public to get close to the original engineering. The shape and orientation of the pier is echoed and extended inland by the podium which unifies the site and reinforces the connection with the river. The new public walkway, which extends across the road to the pier, provides pedestrian access to the terraces and viewpoints on the water. The relocation of the old river defence wall creates space for proper pavements on West Street and an improved flood protection barrier further to the north. http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=11355
  3. The jury members are: - Melvin Charney, architect; - Odile Decq, architect and Director of the École Spéciale d'Architecture, Paris; - Jacques Des Rochers, Curator of Canadian Art, Montréal Museum of Fine Arts; - Michel Dionne, architect, Cooper, Robertson & Partners, New York; - Raphaël Fischler, urban planner and professor at the School of Urban Planning, McGill University; - Mario Masson, landscape architect and Division Manager, Service du développement culturel, de la qualité du milieu de vie et de la diversité ethnoculturelle, Ville de Montréal; - Alessandra Ponte, associate professor, School of Architecture, Université de Montréal; - Philippe Poullaouec-Gonidec, landscape architect and holder of the UNESCO Chair in Landscape and Environmental Design at Université de Montréal. Instructions for prospective entrants (Courtesy of CNW Telbec)
  4. A new survey of Quebecers' attitudes on education shows that two out of three prefer to have the right to send their children to any school in the province they choose, public or private. The poll, conducted for The Gazette by Léger Marketing, asked whether students other than those now allowed, including franco-phones, should have access to English-language schools if they wish. A total of 66 per cent of a representative sample of Quebecers agreed that they should - including a 61-per-cent clear majority of francophones. Non-francophones were even more overwhelmingly in favour, at 87 per cent. Women, at 71 per cent, were significantly more so than the 66 per cent of men who agreed. Overall, 30 per cent disagreed - that is, 35 per cent of francophones and 11 per cent of non-francophones. Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/life/Most+back+allowing+choice+schooling/3011261/story.html#ixzz0newGaF9e
  5. The Canadian government is changing the rules on foreign ownership of airlines in Canada. They can now own up to 49% of an airline up from 25%. So it is a possibility that Porter will be bought. The other new small discount players could also be bought and give more access to Canadians. Also I saw a few days ago that Southwest Airlines is looking to fly into Canada in the future. Time will tell how things turn out. It would be nice to have a carrier similar to Ryanair operate within Canada.
  6. Website: 1200redpath-cr.com [sTREETVIEW]https://maps.google.ca/maps?ll=45.50258,-73.583658&spn=0.006204,0.009516&cbll=45.502583,-73.583658&layer=c&panoid=S8SQW7jZasjLsujb3Tl06g&cbp=12,299.98,,0,-7.69&t=h&z=17[/sTREETVIEW]
  7. Exclusive Business Class Travel Between Toronto and Montreal MONTREAL, Feb. 28, 2017 /CNW Telbec/ - Ufly, a new business class travel experience, announced today that it will sell exclusive flights between the Billy Bishop and Saint-Hubert airports from Monday to Friday, at a frequency of two round trips daily. Offering numerous advantages such as online bookings at a fixed rate, last minute boarding in addition to quick and easy access to aircrafts, Ufly and Pascan Aviation are every business traveler's dream. An accessible, exclusive and efficient service Ideal for frequent business flyers, Ufly truly demonstrates a full executive treatment: comfortable, exclusive and luxurious. Thanks to its unprecedented service offering, Ufly members can take advantage of a VIP lounge, a dedicated phone reservation line, a mobile application, and free parking near the priority security checkpoint and check-in. As a high-end luxury service provider, Ufly sells seats on private nine-seater Pilatus PC 12 planes, the safest on the market, equipped with comfortable, large leather seats that are operated by Pascan Aviation. Available on a member-only basis, Ufly proposes several membership types to meet every travelers' corporate budget allowances. Furthermore, ticket prices do not fluctuate throughout the year, allowing users to benefit from fixed rates that include snacks and beverages and an unlimited number of flights! For more information, go to uFly. About Ufly Launched in February 2017, Ufly sells tickets for Pascan Aviation between Saint-Hubert airport and Billy Bishop airport in Toronto, as well as between Saint-Hubert airport and Québec City, Val-d'Or and Bagotville. Ufly is primarily designed for business professionals and offers preferential access to planes operated by Pascan Aviation. The service is designed to dramatically reducing airport wait times. Members have access to an unlimited number of flights at a fixed rate. Ufly plans to offer more routes in the upcoming year. For more information, go to uFly.
  8. Hello everyone, I'm an airline employee and a big proponent of YUL and it's future development. Lately I have been using Toronto's public transit system to get to the airport. Even though not as developed as ours, their subway, combined with the new 192 Airport Rocket, is really a winning combination, and has made me really step back and take at look at YUL and our airport access (just a bit better than terrible). From Kipling station the Airport Rocket is a 15 minute express bus from a metro directly to Terminal 1, 3 and Airport road near the hotels. Now before you start, yes, I know Montreal has this too in our 747 bus, directly from Lionel Groulx. However, the difference lies in that the Toronto express bus is part of their transit system, and only costs 3.00$, and a transfer from anywhere else in the network is valid. Why on earth would we charge 10$ for such a service?!?! It should almost be free! Anyway, I just wish the STM would make the 747 a regular bus line with a regular fare and transfers from the other parts of the network accepted, then we could call our airport SOMEWHAT accessible. And don't even get me started on the fact they now have direct train access......argh Rant Over.
  9. Hi guys...Anybody have access to this MERX Private Construction site. I am limited to government bids. How about Habsfan or Mark AC or Lindberg etc etc I hi-lited 4 projects that I don't think we know about on our MTLURB. These are official bids so these are approved and will be proceeding as soon as the bids are accepted. I hope we find a couple of big surprises!!!!!!!!!! Gain access to hundreds of Construction projects with MERX Private Construction MERX Private Construction provides a value-added service tailored to contractors looking for project information needed to bid on contracts in the Canadian construction industry. Reporting on projects from the 'pre-design' stage through to the start of construction, businesses of any size have affordable access to billions of dollars in construction opportunities. From the construction of houses and hotels to office buildings and shopping malls, MERX Private Construction has all the information you need to bid on contracts. Please review the listings below of the latest opportunities posted in your region All of Quebec Townhouses & Condominium- La Cite Verte – Québec Condominium - Place des Jardins (Phase 1-5) Québec Condominium - Bella Vista - Phase 2 (101 Units) St-Laurent Office Building - Complexe Jules Dallard - Phase 2 – Québec Data Centre – Québec Rose Mining Project - Nemaska Condominium Marquise (Phase 2-8) Laval Kipawa Rare Earth Project - Open pit mine – Rouyn-Noranda Westin Resort & Spa Tremblant (Renovations) Mont Tremblant Condominium - Le Signature (Phase 2) Québec Head Office (Conversion) Montreal Niobec Mine Expansion - Saguenay Condominium - Les Haltes du Roi (Phase 3-9) Trois-Rivieres Condominium - Cite de la Gare (Phase 2-5) St-Constant Condominium - SE7T (Phase 1-3) Montreal Condominium - U31 (Phase 1-3) Montreal Senior Residence – Ste Therese de Gaspe Condominium - Les Meandres – Camomille – Quebec Apartments/Condominiums 4+ Stories (72 Units) Rouyn-Noranda Condominium - Ilot Esso – Québec Condominium - Coop Evrelle – Beauport Theatre du Rideau Vert - Phase 2 – Montreal Theatre/Cultural Centre – Longueuil Office Tower - Hotel/Motel - Montreal Commercial Development - Carrefour de la Bravoure – Val-Belair Condominium (Phase 1-4) Terrebonne Condominium - Le URB – Montreal Lithium Spodumene Mine Project – La Corne Condominium - Station 7 (Phase 1-7) St-Jerome Condominium Woodfield Sillery (87 Units) Quebec Condominium- Acces M (79 Units) Quebec Dolbeau Oxygen Manufacturing Facility (Expansion) Dolbeau-Mistassini Quartier Sud - Seniors Residence – Levis Caisse Populaire - Municipal Building – St Liguori Cinema Mega-Plex Guzzo - Sainte-Therese Condominium Apartment Townhouse (160 Units) Aylmer Lac-Leamy Hilton Hotel (Reno) Gatineau 75 Rene-Levesque Ouest (Condominium Building) Quebec 18-Storey Condo Towers – Montreal Apartment - Place Lamoureux (Phase 2-3) Rimouski Condominium (Phase 1-6) Val-David Townhouse Development (Phase 1-6) Beaconfield Condo des rue Equinoxes (Phase 1-4) St Laurent Condominium Phase Three (18 Units) Hudson Condominium Opus - Phase 5 – Lasalle Condominium (Phase 2-4) Vaudreuil Condominium (30 Buildings, 180 Total Units) Mont Tremblant Theatre Le Cube - Montreal Shopping Centre - Place Lorraine - Lorraine The Grove at Montreal Student Apartments (Conv/Renov) Montreal Pricing All of Quebec 109.99/month or 960.00/Pre-Paid Yearly (savings of 359.88) Montreal and District 69.99/month or 660.00/Pre-Paid Yearly (savings of 179.88) Quebec City and District 54.99/month or 480.00/Pre-Paid Yearly (savings of 179.88) Our Flexible subscription options allows you to use our service on a monthly basis with no contract obligations or you can pre-pay our service for the year and save 25% Plan ahead with MERX Private Construction · Search Canadian construction projects by Region or by Project Type Quickly identify projects suited to your business or skill set with our exclusive access to McGraw-Hill Dodge Reports
  10. voiçi quelques images j'ai pris de l'entrée de la gare de Lille Europe:
  11. WOW just wow! http://www.architizer.com/en_us/blog/dyn/38638/azerbaijan-to-build-one-kilometer-tall-skyscraper/ Developers in Azerbaijan are planning to build a kilometer-high tower that would, obviously, be the world’s tallest. As News.az reports, Haji Ibrahim Nehramli, president of the Avesta Group of Companies, promises that the Azerbaijan Tower, as the project is being called, would rise 1,050 meters with 189 floors to dwarf both the Burj Khalifa (by 220 meters or 722 feet) and the Kingdom Tower currently planned for Jeddah, Saudi Arabia (by 50 meters or 164 feet). That’s not all. The Avesta Group will be planting their tower on an artificial island in the Caspian Sea, at the foot of virginal beaches and crystalline waters . The Azerbaijan Tower will be the crowning centerpiece of the Khazar Islands, a $100 billion city of 41 artificial islands that will spread 2,000 hectares over the Caspian. The buoyant metropolis is being planned for 1 million residents, who will be housed in endless rows of high-rises ranging for 25 to 60 stories in height with access to over 150 schools, 50 hospitals and daycare centers, plus numerous parks, shopping malls, cultural centers, university campuses, and even a Formula 1 racetrack. The city will be equipped with a robust network of “innovative” bridges and infrastructure that will link outlying islands to the urban core, while a large municipal airport will provide access to and from the radiant city. To briefly focus on the tower itself–much could be said on the vacuity of the entire project–the admittedly comical form altogether shuns the slim, shard-like profiles that characterize the current crop of Brobdingnagian skyscraper design. Instead, it curiously alludes both to the platonic massings of Constructivist projects (via corporate High-Tech of ’80s and ’90s) and various paper arcologies of the last quarter of the past century, from the Metabolists to the Sims. Construction on the Azerbaijan Tower is set to break ground in 2015 and will continue onto completion in 2018-2019 at a cost of $2 billion. And like all of the city’s other structures, the tower has been designed to withstand up to a 9.0 magnitude quake. The Khazar Islands are scheduled to be ready by 2022. LOL:
  12. Courtesy of Advisors.ca http://www.advisor.ca/news/industry-news/bmo-makes-buying-gold-simple-59141 Seems like BMO is following Scotia bank.
  13. There are an article in The Gazette (which I shall put after this post) that speaks about Montreal embracing open data. Also, anybody every been to Ottawa, Quebec? lol How Open Data Initiatives Can Improve City Life by Aliza Sherman Major city governments across North America are looking for ways to share civic data — which normally resides behind secure firewalls — with private developers who can leverage it to serve city residents via web and mobile apps. Cities can spend on average between $20,000 and $50,000 — even as much as $100,000 — to cover the costs of opening data, but that’s a small price to pay when you consider how much is needed to develop a custom application that might not be nearly as useful. Here are a few examples of initiatives that are striving to make city governments more efficient and transparent through open data. 1. Apps4Ottawa – Ottawa, Quebec Careful to adhere to security and privacy regulations for their open data program, the City of Ottawa started sharing data in several areas: geo-spatial (roadways, parks, runways, rivers, and ward boundaries); recreation facilities; event planning; civic elections data; and transit, including schedules. Other data the city is pursuing includes tree inventory, collections schedules for garbage, recycling and compost, and bike and foot paths. Ottawa aligned their first open data contest, Apps4Ottawa, with the school year (September 2010 to January 2011 ) to involve colleges and universities as well as residents and local industry. Categories for the contest included “Having Fun in Ottawa,” “Getting Around,” “Green Environment/Sustainability,” “Community Building,” and “Economic Development.” The winner is scheduled to be announced later this evening. Guy Michaud, chief information officer for the City of Ottawa, said their open data efforts have already spurred economic development and is meant to be good for local entrepreneurs. The city receives no revenue through the apps, and the developers can sell what they create. In turn, Ottawa residents get improved services from applications that are created, with better access to city data and more user-friendly formats and platforms. 2. CivicApps.org – Portland, Oregon After tracking Vivek Kundra’s efforts at the federal level with data.gov, Portland, Oregon launched CivicApps.org, a project initiated out of the mayor’s office to bring a more localized approach to the open data movement. Skip Newberry, economic policy advisor to the mayor, say that the project’s main objective is to improve connections and the flow of information between local government and its constituents, as well as between city bureaus. To call attention to the release of public data, they also launched an app design contest, highlighting the tech talent in Portland’s software community. According to Rick Nixon, program manager for the Bureau of Technology’s Open Data Initiative for the city of Portland, CivicApps.org took a more regional approach to cover the multiple layers of local government: County, Metro, TriMet, and the City of Portland, all of which collect and maintain various kinds of public data. Data sets released include regional crime, transit, infrastructure (i.e. public works), and economic development programs. Additional projects, such as the PDX API, have been launched in order to make the raw data from CivicApps more useful to developers. In addition to developer-specific apps, a number of transit related apps — bike, train, bus, mixed modes — were also developed. A very popular and established transit app, PDXBus, was re-released as open source under the rules of the CivicApps contest. Other popular apps helped provide residents greater awareness of their surroundings such as where to find heritage trees, where to find urban edibles, and where to locate each other during disaster relief efforts. 3. CityWide Data Warehouse – Washington, DC For years, the District of Columbia provided public access to city operational data via the Internet. In keeping with the mayor’s promise to be transparent, the program CityWide Data Warehouse was launched, and provides citizens with access to over 450 datasets from multiple agencies. The first two datasets released were service requests from the mayor’s call center, including trash pickup, pot hole repair, street light repair, snow removal, parking meter issues and crime data. According to David Stirgel, program manager for Citywide Data Warehouse, the project looks for data that be of interest to the widest possible audience and which will remain reusable over time. Some of the applications that have come out of the program include Track DC, which tracks the performance of individual District agencies, and summary reports that provide public access to city operational data. Some of the applications built by companies and individuals using the data include Crime Reports and Every Block. In 2008, the District Mayor’s office, the District of Columbia’s Office of the Chief Technology Officer, and digital agency iStrategyLabs launched Apps for Democracy, an open code app development contest tapping into District data that cost $50,000 and generated 47 apps. The contest was repeated in 2009. Over 200 ideas and applications were submitted, and the winner was an iPhone and Facebook app called Social DC 311. It could be used to submit service requests, such as reporting potholes and trash problems. An honorable mention was given to FixMyCityDC. Unfortunately, neither app is maintained today. 4. NYC Data Mine – New York, NY NYC BigApps 2.0 is part of an initiative to improve the accessibility, transparency, and accountability of city government. According to Brandon Kessler, CEO of ChallengePost, the company and technology powering the NYC BigApps 2.0 Software Challenge, Mayor Bloomberg challenged software developers to use city data from the NYC.gov Data Mine to create apps to improve NYC, offering a $20,000 in cash awards to the winners. The second annual challenge closed its call for submissions at the end of January 2011 and opened the vote to the public. Voting ends on March 9. Requirements included that the software applications be original and solely owned by the entrants, that they use at least one of the datasets from the NYC.gov Data Mine, and be free to the public throughout the competition and for at least one year after the challenge. The panel of judges reads like a “who’s who” of New York tech luminaries, and includes Esther Dyson of EDVenture, Fred Wilson of Union Square Ventures, Jack Dorsey of Square and Twitter, and Kara Swisher of All Things Digital. One of the first year’s winning apps was WayFinder, an augmented reality Android app which allows users to point their phone in a direction and see which subways and Path trains are in front of them. 5. DataSF – San Francisco, California Like other city governments, San Francisco’s goal for their DataSF program was to improve transparency and community engagement as well as accountability. Ron Vinson, director of media for the city’s Department of Technology also stated potential for innovation in how residents interact with government and their community. With an emphasis on adhering to privacy and security policies, the city can stimulate the creation of useful civic tools at no cost to the government. Before launching, they reached out to Washington, DC to identify the most popular datasets, and learned that 20% of the datasets represented over 80% of the downloads. With this information, they went out first with crime, 311, and GIS data. They also allowed the public to request data through a submissions mechanism on the website where others could vote on their suggestions. This input is now required reading for the city administrator thanks to an executive directive and open data legislation. Since launching in August 2009, DataSF has accumulated over 60 applications in its showcase. According to Vinson, the city stays engaged with their tech community by participating in local unconferences and meetups. http://mashable.com/2011/02/15/how-open-data-initiatives-can-improve-city-life/
  14. Gazette begins charging for website access May 25, 2011 – 6:54 am| Posted in Media Publisher Alan Allnutt announced in Wednesday's paper that The Gazette is moving back to a paid model for its website. Based on a similar move by the New York Times earlier this year, montrealgazette.com will have a metered paywall, which allows a certain number of free articles a month and then charges for access beyond that. The model is designed to get heavy users to pay for content while not discouraging occasional readers who might reach an article through a Google search or a blog link. The system, which is managed by Press+ and expected to be running by the end of the day, will allow 20 free articles a month, then charge $6.95 a month (or $69.95 a year) for access. This compares to $26.19/month for six-day print delivery or $9.95/month for the Digital Edition. Print subscribers will, once they register, have unlimited access to online content. The meter will only apply to "premium" content from The Gazette and Postmedia News, including photo galleries and videos. "Major" breaking news stories, blogs and content on affiliated websites like Hockey Inside/Out and West Island Gazette Plus won't be subject to the meter. It's unclear whether other wire copy (Reuters, AFP, etc.) will apply. Wire stories, including those from Postmedia News, Reuters and Agence France-Presse, will count toward the meter, even though many of those are freely available elsewhere. Users of the iPad app will not be metered. Nor will mobile users. "A great deal has been written about the economics of publishing newspapers in 2011," Allnutt writes. "The 'old' model - selling newsprint products very cheaply to readers and selling the audience to advertisers for the majority of income - is increasingly challenged. Simply transferring advertisers from print to online may not work for all. In order to continue our investment in the quality and depth of our award-winning journalism and offer you the features and functions you want from our website, we believe we have to find new sources of revenue." Once upon a time, The Gazette used to charge for online access, under a model similar to what Le Devoir uses today: Some articles free, but most completely locked down behind a paywall, with only the first paragraph available to non-subscribers. Like the Times, The Gazette abandoned this model with the hope that increased advertising revenue would be more profitable than the subscriber revenue that comes out of the paywall. The big question, of course, is whether or not this will work. The Times got 100,000 subscribers in its first month (most of those at 99 cents for four weeks), but its model isn't universally loved, and it has been criticized as being too loose and having too many loopholes. More importantly, there are still plenty of free sources of local, national and international news online, so paid sites need a significant amount of original content that can't be found elsewhere. People aren't going to pay for stories about highway crashes, politics and press releases they can get from six different sources. There's also the added difficulty that, as part of the Postmedia Network, The Gazette shares content with websites of other newspapers, and those newspapers share content with it. Charging for a Gazette article will be pointless if it can be found unmetered on ottawacitizen.com. The Victoria Times-Colonist is also moving to a metered system (one that charges print subscribers as well), but other Postmedia websites are not. Postmedia is waiting to see how The Gazette and the Times-Colonist fare. Of course, as much as I'm a fan of an open Internet and getting things for free, being a Gazette employee I stand to benefit indirectly if this results in a lot of new revenue. So subscribe away! A page of frequently asked questions has been posted, and subscriptions are being taken. UPDATE: Some early reaction from Twitter. As you can imagine a lot of it is negative (or at least sarcastic): trelayne: #Montreal Gazette going to "meter" your access to 10 views/month, then U pay! cooky-clueless readers R screwed justinCgio: Without debate @mtlgazette moves to a "metered" model. $6.95 per month after free 20 articles. #media #nevergoingtopay ArcadiaMachine: I guess I'll be reading Cyberpresse a lot more from now on. MsWendyKH: Check it: @MtlGazette adopts French literacy program! jacobserebrin: The Gazette is setting up a paywall. Why? Gaz has little pull, isn't the NY Times. Other Postmedia sites still giving away same content. codejill: I could imagine paying that for a coalition of papers, but not for the gazette all by itself... NathalieCollard: Ouf! Bonne chance! conradbuck: So they'll start writing premium content? justinCgio: In a job interview with @mtlgazette I brought up how the #RSS feeds were broken and how the web wasn't live enough. Now you want me to pay? ALundyGlobal: Interested to see results in a few months Sita311: #lame I'd put up with advertisement if would remain free. Andrew_MTL: great, that's a simple delete from my bookmarks. PLENTY of credible news resources for free. You going to charge for tweets too? ikenney: Goodbye Montreal Gazette. I won't be reading you anymore!! montrealmarc: People respect the truth. You should just admit that you need the money, not that u r following NY Times business model. tomhawthorn: What will readers do to get around paywall? Whatever it takes. Or they will go elsewhere. They will not pay. noahtron: the #paywall put up by @mtlgazette will certainly help increase readership... just cuz it works for @nytimes doesn't mean it works for you! AVassiliou: We have to pay for @mtlgazette on-line now?? #hugefail Fortunately, plenty of free news sites remain. Times must be tough for @mtlgazette finnertymike: Re Montreal Gazette paywall: current online offer not wow, plus @Cyberpresse outstanding and free. Subscriber interest likely tiny methinks finnertymike: Re MTL Gazette paywall 2: Need an online strategy beyond "Ok, pay now": must-read voices? multimedia/graphics? liveblogs? pizazz? delmarhasissues: Hilarious that The Gazette cites The NY Times when justifying charging for online content. I'll pay for The Times. YOU'RE NOT THE TIMES! jfmezei: Unless all Postmedia papers lock down, people will just go to other postmedia sites to get the exact same news. montrealmarc: All the big newspapers need to meet like the heads of the 5 families in "The Godfather" & make a group agreement to all go metered furry_princess: There's a reason I stopped subscribing to the Gazoo back in 2002. #tabloidfluff JulienMcEvoy: Voir une annonce «The Gazette cherche un(e) directeur(trice) du marketing» le jour où ils annoncent leur paywall, c'est comme ironique. Milnoc: The Gazette already lost me as a reader years ago @finnertymike. What makes them think a paywall will encourage me to come back? Sheesh! aranr: The Gazette's paywall scheme is so misguided. I'd pay to read their HockeyInsideOut mini-site but not the paper itself. #montreal cdiraddo: So now that @mtlgazette has started to meter their site, it means I will no longer link to them in fear that they may ask my visitors to pay jesspatterson: how else are they to pay their costs? gotta come from somewhere. spafax_arjun: If the Montreal Gazette wants people to pay for the content online it needs to step up its game by 2000% The comments on the story on The Gazette's website are even worse (and less grammatically correct), as are those on the Times-Colonist story. There's also some reaction on The Gazette's Facebook page. Other coverage from: The Globe and Mail The CBC (Comments there are similarly not very nice) Presse canadienne Canadian Press Global Montreal Financial Post Métro J-Source UPDATE (May 26): Postmedia boss Paul Godfrey was on Toronto's Metro Morning to explain the paywall deal. Summarized by J-Source. Tags: newspapers, paywalls, The Gazette, Victoria Times-Colonist | Short URL for this post: http://fagstein.com/?p=10546 http://blog.fagstein.com/2011/05/25/gazette-charging-for-online/
  15. jesseps

    Friend

    I did a photo shoot with a friend this morning, it went so-so. I will for sure have to redo the shoot To access the pictures you have to enter for the username: tbd and for the password: tatiana The pictures I posted on mobile me are the ones that came out the best, even though the aren't the best quality I have no idea why there was so much noise it never happens. Also it was my first time taking photos of someone* Plus the pictures I posted online I did not photoshop them yet. * Someone I know on another forum giving me pointers for the next time I try this. I am open to suggestions. Photo Shoot
  16. April 8, 2009 By MERAIAH FOLEY SYDNEY — The Australian government said Tuesday that it would create a publicly owned company to build a national high-speed broadband network worth 43 million Australian dollars in one of the largest state-sponsored Internet infrastructure upgrades in the world. Prime Minister Kevin Rudd said the eight-year, $31 billion project would create up to 37,000 jobs at the peak of construction, giving a lift to the economy as retail spending slumps and mining companies cut workers amid weakening demand for Australian metals. The plan is “the most ambitious, far-reaching and long-term nation-building infrastructure project ever undertaken by an Australian government,” Mr. Rudd told reporters. The government’s announcement was a surprise rebuff to five private telecommunications firms, including Optus of Singapore and Axia NetMedia of Canada, that had been bidding to build a slower, less expensive network, with fiber-optic cables reaching as far as local nodes, worth around 10 billion dollars. But Mr. Rudd scrapped those proposals in favor of a superior but more expensive network that will deliver broadband speeds of up to 100 megabits per second — fast enough to download multiple movies simultaneously — to 90 percent of Australian buildings through fiber-optic cables that extend directly to the premises. The remaining 10 percent will receive upgraded wireless access. Analysts said the government-sponsored project would be the most ambitious fiber-to-the-premises network to have been undertaken by any nation and would be watched carefully by other governments considering Internet infrastructure spending as a way to stimulate growth as the global economic crisis continues. The Britain, Canada, Finland, Germany, Portugal, Spain and the United States have all included measures to expand broadband access and to bolster connection speeds in their planned stimulus packages. “Compared to what has been done elsewhere, this is quite a unique situation,” said Laurent Horrut, a telecommunications analyst at J.P. Morgan. Most developed countries have relied heavily on private-sector spending to upgrade their Internet networks, and those that have pledged public money have come “nowhere close” to the level of spending announced by Australia, he said. “This will set Australia up as potentially one of the international leaders here,” Paul Budde, an independent telecommunications analyst, said in a statement posted on his blog. “This government understands the trans-sector approach that is needed to stimulate the digital economy.” The government would make an initial investment of 4.7 billion Australian dollars in the enterprise, in which taxpayers would hold a 51 percent share. The remaining costs would be financed by investment from private companies and the sale of infrastructure bonds. Once the network was fully operational, Mr. Rudd said, the government would sell down its interest within five years. Mr. Rudd’s conservative opponent, Malcolm Turnbull, and some analysts criticized the plan, saying the cost of the project would likely be passed to consumers in the form of higher Internet fees. They also questioned whether consumers would embrace a fixed-line, fiber-to-the-premises network over increasingly popular wireless services. Even those who agree that the proposal is both sensible and achievable said setting the right price for companies to access the network would be “a major challenge.” “A low price will discourage private investors, but a high price will discourage consumer uptake and service innovation,” David Kennedy, research director at global advisory and consulting firm Ovum, said in an e-mailed statement. While most analysts agree that investing in communications technology makes economies more competitive, some are skeptical about whether long-term spending on communications infrastructure will provide the short-term stimulus needed to pull countries out of recession. The plan fulfills a 2007 election promise Mr. Rudd made to overhaul the country’s sprawling, antiquated Internet infrastructure. But the government is also holding the project up as a job-creating form of fiscal stimulus in a time when the private sector is shedding jobs at a faster-than-expected rate. On Tuesday, the Reserve Bank of Australia cut its benchmark cash rate by 0.25 percentage point to 3 percent, its lowest level since March 1960, amid signs the once-booming economy is continuing to deteriorate. The bank has so far slashed 4.25 percentage points from the cash rate since September in a bid to stop the country from slipping into its first recession in nearly two decades. According to government figures released last week, retail sales fell 2 percent in February, the biggest one-month drop since the introduction of a 10 percent goods and services tax in July 2000. Unemployment data has also gone from bad to worse. Australia and New Zealand Banking said Monday that job advertisements in newspapers and on the Internet had dropped 8.5 percent from February to March and a staggering 44.6 percent from the year before. It warned that unemployment could exceed 8 percent by next year. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/08/technology/internet/08broadband.html?_r=1&ref=business
  17. jesseps

    VISA Codesure

    <object width="640" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YX08fdvFwaM&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YX08fdvFwaM&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="640" height="385"></embed></object> Pretty cool. I wonder if we will see this in the near future. RBC are releasing some or all of their new credit cards with to be used by PayWave systems, which is convenient, but does not make sense when you have chip&pin on the card to stop people from using it. Even with the chip&pin security, the card can still be entered manually and be used. One thing I would like for Canadian banks to start handing out security keys for bank accounts. Instead of having to update your password or remembering it when you go online. The key has a randomly generated password you need to use to access your account online. Only person I have seen something like that was my ex. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Security_token
  18. Air Canada Adds Non-Stop Montreal-Algiers and Montreal-Marseille Flights Starting in Summer 2017 - Sep 28, 2016
  19. WARNING: VERY LARGE PICTURES AHEAD also see my Montréal from 75m up + pano thread. I met a friend of a friend who's a security supervisor in the tallest building in Montréal. He heard about my photography so he agreed on bringing me to the roof of 1000 rue de la Gauchètiere. I was so excited that I did not wait, I called him the next day ( i did not want him to forget about it) and showed up. It wasn't a sunny day and i only had a super wide zoom ( i regretted that later because a zoom is much need up there ). It was not easy to take the pictures because its not easy to access the roof all around. So not all the angles are covered... sigh... I couldn't get the northern side where we see the center of the CBD and the mountain. Did i tell you how excited I was? Once back down on earth i realized i had shoot everything in the medium format... i wanted RAW I also decided to include very high res pictures in this thread so you guys can see all the details. The good news is that I will be back there with super zoom on a sunny day to get more more more Anyhow, here goes: it starts here: A view to the west and 1250 René-Lévesque: At the bottom, the Bell Center, and coming right into the heart of the city the Ville Marie 720 highway. Don't look down (no barrier whatsoever): A northwestern view, with the Mountain, the St-Joseph Oratory and for the first time some stuff from the other side of the mountain. Condos condos condos... and St-Henri in the background: The St-Lawrence river in the background with nun's island condos: west cluster: Looks like simcity :koko: Top: Champlain bridge, busiest bridge in Canada I think. Middle: heart of industrial Canada in the 19th century with the Lachine Canal. Bottom: Old industrial buildings being converted into... condos With the Engineering school on the right. Mini pano with the Victoria bridge and the St-Lawrence seaway. Mini pano with the Casino (white and gold buildings) and Habitat 67: Mini pano with St-Helene island, the southshore and the Tour de la Bourse in the foreground. Mini pano with the Jacques-Cartier bridge (with LaRonde amusement park), the old port in the foreground and very further the "new" port, the Longueuil talls are in the middle on the other side of the bridge. Mini pano with the River going as far as the eye can see and the eastern part of Montréal: La tour de la Bourse with parts of Old Montréal: The international quarter, notice the roof-park on the very bottom of the picture: Mini pano, blurry because the camera was held at arms' lenght, we see part of the mountain, place ville marie ... that would be the best angle in my opinion if there was some kind of access... but there's none giving to that part of the city: A last closeup of Old Montréal: Finally the two giant panos. The view to the west: To the east:
  20. Here are some examples that show US based companies that have retail stores in Québec, but don't rush (if at all) to translate their online sites, probably because of the relatively small population base in Quebec vis à vis North America. In the meantime we are cut off from ordering online. http://montrealgazette.com/business/local-business/retail/blocked-in-quebec-u-s-stores-shut-down-english-only-web-sites-when-they-open-here Blocked in Quebec: U.S. stores shut down English-only web sites when they open here EVA FRIEDE, MONTREAL GAZETTE More from Eva Friede, Montreal Gazette Published on: November 12, 2014Last Updated: November 12, 2014 5:20 PM EST Many retailers have closed their sites to Quebec traffic due to language restrictions. As the invasion of U.S. retailers continues and as the Internet increasingly becomes the marketplace and the research centre of consumers, some Quebecers are getting unpleasant surprises: some companies have blocked access to their websites here either because they have voluntarily complied with the French Language Charter or because they have received a notice from the Office québécois de la langue française. The latest sites to shut down are Williams-Sonoma, West Elm, Pottery Barn and Pottery Barn Kids, all part of the same San Francisco-based company and all arrived in Quebec within the last two years. The sites shut down on Oct. 22, according to a company spokesperson. But a quick survey shows many prominent U.S. retailers with brick-and-mortar stores in Quebec continue to operate English-only shopping sites here. The probable reason: the Office québécois de la langue française, charged with ensuring that Quebec’s French Language Charter is respected, sends notices to retailers only if complaints are filed, said spokesman Jean-Pierre Le Blanc. The Williams-Sonoma spokesperson confirmed in an email that the brands have ceased e-commerce activities in Quebec for an undetermined period in order to comply with Quebec language regulations. The home pages and other information pages are available in English only, but clicking on the shopping link takes you to a redirect loop. “We are actively working with the stores in order to find ways to continue to make the shopping experience memorable for our Quebec customers,” the spokesperson wrote. BCBG, Club Monaco and Urban Outfitters are among other retail brands that block access to shopping or to their entire sites in Quebec. Urban Outfitters and Anthropologie, part of the same Philadelphia-based company, blocked access to their websites when they opened stores here. Anthropologie, which opened in Montreal in late 2012, launched its French website 13 months later. Urban Outfitters remains blocked. But Free People, also part of the chain, does not have a store here and the site is accessible, either for research or Internet sales. Similarly, Club Monaco shut its site in Quebec when it launched an online shopping site. A visit to its home page invites customers to visit its store, which is soon to expand and move to a prominent location at Ste-Catherine St. W. at Metcalfe, from Les Cours Mont-Royal. Founded by Canadian Joe Mimran in Toronto in 1985, Club Monaco is now owned by Ralph Lauren and headquartered in New York. sent via Tapatalk
  21. Mi'X 28 condos dans le Mile-Ex 28 condos dans le Mile-Ex Le Mi’X vous offre l’opportunité de vivre dans le cœur du Mile-Ex, un quartier en pleine ébullition. Imaginez-vous à quelques pas du Marché Jean-Talon, le Parc Jarry, la Petite Italie et 2 stations de Metro (Parc et deCastelnau). Vivre au Mi’X c’est la vraie vie de quartier. De plus le Mi’X contient un ascenseur et stationnement sous-terrain. Le Mi’X est un investissement assurée. Condos à partir de 173,900 + tx et plusieurs unités qualifie pour la subvention Access à la Propriété Livraison a partir du 1er mars 2015 Bureau des ventes Bureau des ventes ouvert 5405 St-Denis, Montreal Lundi - Jeudi 13h30 a 19h00 Sam-Dim 12h00 a 17h00 Tél: 514-998-1514 Fax: 514-744-9169 Courriel: [email protected] http://www.mondev.ca/138-condo-mi-x-28-condos-dans-le-mile-ex.html
  22. https://www.flyporter.com/About/News-Release-Details?id=168&culture=en-CA I know, I know. It is easier for us to just drive there. That is interesting that people from Toronto can fly to Burlington now, plus also Tremblant. I was checking the prices, Montreal to Burlington (via. Toronto) is about $179 for one way. Plus they just started flying to Boston also.