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Found 7 results

  1. I hope this becomes an useful thread about the numerous protests that happen in Montreal every year. I'm mainly creating this thread to ask you guys what is all the noise going on in downtown right now? What is that protest about? Is it peaceful/safe? Why are news sources so slow to report things like these?
  2. Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/montreal/story/2010/01/29/qc-charest-protests-india-asbestos.html#ixzz0e4r4XXPU
  3. Couple of old projects that never saw the light of day as they were planned ...Cite Concordia was drastically downsized and redesigned... Dashed projects - 1968 Two downtown projects that never happened. The Eaton-Mace project was a $125,000,0000 building slated for the area bounded by St. Catherine and Sherbrooke between University & Mansfield. It was guided by Brigadier-General Gordon Dorward de Salaberry Wotherspoon. The Montreal Trust mortgage group took it over after Mace ran out of cash. The Place de la Concorde was a $250,000,000 project to be plopped between Milton and Pine, Ste. Famile and Hutchison, roughly the area of what they tried to do a couple of years later with the La Cite project which would have levelled much of the McGill ghetto had it not it not been largely blocked by protests. I was not able to post it in cancelled projects!!
  4. tres tres triste. Je gage de voir 3 ou 4 personnes commencer a insulter Villeneuve Former Formula 1 champion Jacques Villeneuve said he left Quebec because of the province’s language laws, business climate and the general “morose ambiance.” In an exclusive interview with QMI Agency, Villeneuve, who works as an F1 analyst on French and Italian television, said he “no longer felt at home” in Quebec. He recently sold his luxurious home in one of Montreal’s wealthiest neighbourhoods and is now living in Andorra, a microstate that is known as a tax haven, located in the Pyreneese mountains between France and Spain. “My leaving had nothing to do with taxes,” Villeneuve said. Rather, he said he didn’t appreciate Quebec’s “evolution,” which he said reminded him of France. “Everything bad about France was transferred to Quebec,” he said. “The social ills, the student protests ... The climate is such that people hesitate before investing in Quebec.” He blamed government regulations for scaring off investors, and said he didn’t want his three children to live in the “morose ambiance” in Quebec that “blocks its future.” In particular, Villeneuve targeted the province’s language laws, which legislate the use of the French language. He said it’s up to parents to teach their children how to speak French. The former F-1 driver will be in Montreal in two weeks for the Canadian Grand Prix where he’ll likely draw criticism for his recent remarks on Quebec. Villeneuve also received the wrath from student movement leaders last spring when he invited striking students to “stop protesting and go back to school.”
  5. #12 - Montreal (Courtesy of GOOD) Read more The 50 cities they selected are quite interesting; #1 Hong Kong, #2 Johannesburg and #3 Mexico City.
  6. Israeli consulate to move from downtown to Westmount JASON MAGDER, The Gazette Published: 8 hours ago The Israeli consulate is moving from its downtown location to Westmount. According to the consulate's website, the offices will move from the CIBC building on René Levesque Blvd. at the corner of Peel St. to Westmount Square by next Monday. A spokesperson for the consulate says the consulate's 10-year lease in the CIBC building had expired, so the decision was made to change locations. "This is what suited us best in terms of office space and availability and we took what we could take," said Peter Subissati, the consulate's director of public affairs. Daniel Saykaly, a director of Palestinian and Jewish Unity, called the move a victory for his group. He said the consulate has been embarrassed by weekly protests held in front of the CIBC building since Feb. 9, 2001. "We originally started the weekly vigil in the relatively early stages of the second intifada," he said. "We felt it was important to make a regular public statement against the occupation of the West Bank and Gaza." The consulate's spokesperson denied the group's claim. "The protests had been going on without any incident and I don't think it ever was a factor in our move," Subissati said. He added the offices of the Spanish and Brazilian consulates are also at Westmount Square. Saykaly said PAJU and supporters haven't missed a week since the first protest, and usually between 20 and 30 people demonstrate in front of the CIBC building on Fridays between noon and 1 p.m., waving flags, chanting slogans and handing out flyers. A counter-protest of Israel supporters has been taking place across the street for the last several years, garnering about the same number of people. Saykaly said his group will now move its weekly protests to Ste. Catherine St. at the corner of McGill College Ave., to join members of the Coalition Against Israeli Apartheid in front of the bookstore Indigo. [email protected]
  7. L'idée n'est pas de répartir le débat ici, juste de mettre en ligne ce qui s'écrit sur le Québec à l'étranger. Free lunches, please Protests against tuition fee increases could help an unpopular government May 5th 2012 | OTTAWA | from the print edition Sure beats studying IN THE past year students protesting over the cost of university education in business-friendly Chile have captured the world’s attention. In recent months their counterparts in statist Quebec have taken up the cause. Since February about a third of the province’s 450,000 university students have boycotted classes to oppose the tuition-fee increases planned by Jean Charest, the province’s Liberal premier. Some have blocked roads and vandalised government buildings. On April 25th and 26th around 115 people were arrested, following evening protests that turned into window-smashing in central Montreal. Quebeckers have long seen cheap university education as a birthright. The decision by the centrist Liberals to double fees in 1990 was one reason why they lost control of the province. Their successor was the separatist Parti Québécois (PQ), which responded to a student strike in 1996 by freezing tuition fees for 11 years. But Mr Charest is now in a fiscal squeeze. He has promised to cut a C$3.8 billion ($3.8 billion) deficit to C$1.5 billion this year. Quebec spends 4.6% of its budget on universities, mainly because its fees are the lowest among Canadian provinces. In humanities and social sciences, which have the highest share of striking students, Quebec charges C$2,845 and C$2,629 a year, a bit over half the average in all other provinces. To help close the gap, Mr Charest proposed raising annual fees by a total of C$1,625 over the next five years. When the protests began the government vowed not to negotiate. It soon backtracked, proposing making student loans easier to get, linking repayment to income after graduation, stretching the fee increase over seven years and offering an additional C$39m in bursaries. But the student groups insist on an absolute tuition freeze. Their hard line may help Mr Charest at a tough time. He would love to call an election before an inquiry into corruption in Quebec’s construction industry, which may leave his party squirming, begins in June. But his government is unpopular: an April poll found that 73% of Quebeckers are unhappy with its performance. The opposition PQ has allied itself with the protesters, even putting the students’ red-square logo on its website. That may prove unwise: a recent online poll found that 79% of Quebeckers oppose raising income taxes to pay for universities. If the Liberals can tie the PQ to the movement’s intransigence, Mr Charest might yet risk an early vote and hope to eke out a win. http://www.economist.com/node/21554254
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