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Found 13 results

  1. Canadian smog costs $1 billion, 2,700 lives: CMA Canwest News Service Published: Wednesday, August 13, 2008 The Canadian Medical Association estimates that by 2031, more than 4,900 Canadians, mostly seniors, will die prematurely each year from the effects of polluted air.Dean Bicknell/Canwest News ServiceThe Canadian Medical Association estimates that by 2031, more than 4,900 Canadians, mostly seniors, will die prematurely each year from the effects of polluted air. OTTAWA -- Smog this year will contribute to the premature deaths of 2,700 Canadians and put 11,000 in hospitals, costing the economy and health-care system $1 billion, Canada's doctors say. A report by the Canadian Medical Association calculates that deaths linked to air pollution will rise over the next two decades, claiming nearly twice as many lives each year and costing $1.3 billion annually in health care and lost productivity. The study estimates that by 2031, more than 4,900 Canadians, mostly seniors, will die prematurely each year from the effects of polluted air. Ontario and Quebec will bear the brunt, with smog-related deaths soaring among aging baby-boomers and the chronically ill. In Ontario, the number of premature deaths could double, to 2,200, from 1,200 per year, while hospital admissions over the same period could jump by as much as 70%. The annual health-care and economic costs could rise by as much as 30%, to $740 million, from $570 million. Quebec's mortality rate could rise by 70%, from 700 a year to 1,200, while hospital admissions could spike by 50% annually, costing the province 10% more, or up to $290 million a year. While smog can trigger lung problems, accounting for up to 40% of hospital visits, heart attack and stroke are the real problems, responsible for more than 60% of all air-pollution-related hospital admissions, the study found. Pollutants such as nitrous oxide damage the heart by harming blood vessels, leading to atherosclerosis, a disease that makes people susceptible to heart attack and stroke. Besides the direct costs to the economy and the health system, the study tries to put a price on the poor quality of life and loss of life caused by smog-related deaths. With those estimated costs included, this year's total bill -- in addition to the $1 billion estimate for economic and health-care costs - would amount to more than $10 billion. That figure would rise to $18 billion a year by 2031, with nearly $16 billion of that the price the doctors' association puts on lost lives. But Gordon McBean, a renowned climatologist at the University of Western Ontario, questioned the accuracy of such estimates. While he praised the report and called most of its data sound, he said the attempt to put a price tag on lost life is problematic. "Health-care costs you can do a reasonably good job quantifying, but quality of life and the actual value of life is a bit difficult," said Mr. McBean, co-author of a recently published Health Canada report on the impact of climate change on human health. As a Canadian representative to the Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Mr. McBean said the world's top experts have tried unsuccessfully to come up with similar estimates for the human cost of climate change. "That became very controversial because the people who did it said, 'Well, a North American is worth so many thousand dollars and an African is worth a small fraction of that.' And people like me didn't think that was acceptable," he said. Given that climate change likely will lead to more smoggy days, the report does not exaggerate the level of anticipated deaths caused by air pollution, said Mr. McBean. "They're not overstating the problem. If anything, these are lowball estimates."
  2. (Courtesy of The Financial Post) It is pretty easy you sign up with your credit card or debit and few days later you get your gold delivered to your front door I read somewhere else you can buy up to $6000 CDN worth of Gold per day so almost 6 ounces. Scotia Mocatta
  3. Local architect pledges to stop the ‘joke’ of high-rise Rotterdam World War II saw the destruction of many cities around Europe and not least hit was the city of Rotterdam. While devastating on a human and financial scale this allowed the city to evolve into what is now considered as the ‘high rise city of the Netherlands’. But local architect Jan Willem van Kuilenburg, principal of Monolab Architects has derided this label as ‘a joke’ calling for an extension to the local authorities’ planned high rise zone to the south and proposes Rotterdam's first super-tower, the 450 m high City Tower. “Rotterdam is too hesitant, too defensive and too much like an underdog. After the Erasmus bridge we are in need of a real skyscraper of European scale of which Rotterdam can be proud,” says Kuilenburg, “All currently realised towers in Rotterdam are of mediocre quality and very primitive. As we should save in prosperous periods, it makes the current economic crisis the right time to invest.” Kuilenburg proposes City Tower as the leader in this campaign. The 450 m mixed-use tower with a photovoltaic skin would be built in the water by the Maas Harbour. According to Kuilenburg it would allow the high-rise zone to serve the whole city and help to connect Europe’s largest port to the rest of the city. The tower would be connected to land via a steel pedestrian boulevard to a separate parking lot with the capacity for 1000 cars. Kuilenburg believes this element of the project could aid the local authorities’ plans to liberate the downtown area of traffic by creating a 6th park and ride zone with its close proximity to the Metro. Asked about the likely response from the people of Rotterdam to what would be a very bold visual landmark, Kuilenburg said: “I don’t know. In general Rotterdam people are proud of the skyline, they are energetic and ready to go for new proposals. It has always been a scene for experiment. Rotterdam was bombed in the Second World War and so new buildings emerged, since then people are used to change.” Kuilenburg is currently in talks with developers and calling for international investment for the project. Niki May Young News Editor http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=10909
  4. Montreal Archipelago This map shows 40 meters of sea level rise. Only half of the world’s ice sheets melted to produce this archipelago. I spent a week in Montreal once–and I’ve been in love with it ever since. I don’t really speak French. I gave names to some of the larger islands, but I don’t know it well enough to do it justice. If you have suggestions, let me know! Buy the map! This will happen someday, but not in our lifetimes. Some who have dared to speculate on a timeline have given themselves plenty of space for error in their predictions–one estimate says anywhere from 1,000 to 10,000 years. Whatever the time frame, anthropogenic climate change is a fact–humans are speeding up this process. For all of these maps, I am not portraying any sea level higher than what is possible. The USGS has estimated that the total rise would be about 80 meters.
  5. Enjoy! Compliments of: Le Triomphe, Montreal, scale 1:87 *************************************************** CITÉ NATURE, Montréal, scale 1:87 ********************************************** DOWNTOWN MONTRÉAL, scale 1:1000 Some buildings in green...maybe some day they will rise.
  6. Resale housing market drops 2% in Montreal The Gazette; Reuters Published: 4 hours ago Montreal's resale housing market declined two per cent in 2008, the Greater Montreal Real Estate Board said yesterday. For the first nine months of the year, 8,463 properties changed hands in the Montreal region. Property listings increased 12 per cent compared with the same period a year ago. The average selling price increase was five per cent this past quarter, vs. four per cent in the second quarter and six per cent in the first quarter. "Despite the rise in listings observed over the last two quarters, the high demand is such that the resale market remains favourable to sellers," Michel Beausejour, the board's CEO, said
  7. Ok, j'ai lu les rêgles mais je crois que ce texte devrait être quand même placé ici. Si les admin pensent autrement, simplement supprimé http://inventorspot.com/articles/worlds_tallest_building_be_talle_6398 At 13,123 feet high, the massive, mountain-shaped building envisioned by Japan's Taisei Construction Company would overshadow Mount Fuji itself by nearly 700 feet. That's the equivalent of NINE Empire State Buildings stood one upon the other! The building, known as the X-Seed 4000, is designed to house up to one million residents on as many as 800 floors! Designers have had to consider tricky questions of temperature and pressure differentials between the base and topmost floors, and are looking to utilize solar power to solve these and other critical issues. The cost, you ask? Somewhere between $300 and $900 billion... what's that, an Iraq War or two? Couple of manned Mars missions? Quite do-able - if you're Japan, one of the world's richest countries. One might think the Japanese government would never allow the placing of an edifice the size of the X-Seed 4000 anywhere near sacred Mount Fuji, but Taisei's plans call for the monumental mini-city to rise relatively close by, rising up upon huge caissons sunk deep into the mire underlying Tokyo Bay Could it happen? Well, skeptical citizens of Florence, Italy, scoffed at Leonardo da Vinci's detailed drawings of helicopters and other flying machines. Yet da Vinci's dreams did take flight, centuries later. I wouldn't rush to put down a deposit on a unit just yet, but Taisei's outrageous X-Seed 4000 proposal has the same potential to fly high.
  8. Visited this city last weekend: A known view to start with Pollux and a demolished neighbour Opernturm construction site from above canyon street reflektion of the Commerzbank in Galileo Police squad on the twins of the Deutsche Bank from 0 to 259m... street level entrance of Galileo a lot of contrasts here MainPlaza in evening sun glow Schiller and the MainTower walk-in-the-park roof near the Roßmarkt unkown by many : Frankfurter Welle no comment needed here I like this high rise art in a local bookshop Sand castle 2 worldpowers... density 'made in Frankfurt' Skyper MainTriangle with new low rises Sachsenhausen ...let me show you the way to the next whisky bar... hope you enjoyed it
  9. Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/business/Quebec+real+estate+prices+cent+from+2000+2010/4517279/story.html#ixzz1I5MEJCH1 Next stop, New York prices? At the way the prices are going, I will for sure have a hard time buying a home. True, I could always look into condos, but paying maintenance fees each month
  10. I'm waiting for the usual suspects to put a negative spin to this article... 2015-11-26 Cape Breton Post.com MONTREAL - A new forecast by the Canadian government's lending agency says Quebec's highly diversified economy is on track for a 10 per cent increase in exports this year and eight per cent growth in 2016. Export Development Canada says the continued growth is being led by strong international demand for aircraft and parts, which accounts for nearly 14 per cent of the total value of Quebec exports. EDC says those exports are expected to rise 33 per cent this year and another 17 per cent in 2016. Metals, ores and other industrial products make up the largest sector of Quebec exports are expected to rise five per cent this year and by six per cent growth next year. But the EDC says within this sector, iron ore exports remain depressed as a result of continued price weaknesses and the closure of Cliffs Natural Resources' Bloom Lake mine. "Quebec has a very vibrant aircraft and parts sector and not just the big companies such as Bombardier, CAE and Pratt & Whitney, but also the many smaller firms that supply them," said EDC chief economist Peter Hall. "Demand from around the world, including from emerging markets, has been very strong in 2015, and this will continue in 2016." The EDC also says strong U.S. housing starts are creating demand for lumber and this is helping to drive six per cent growth in exports by Quebec's forestry sector in 2015 and four per cent growth in 2016. The increase in lumber exports also helps to offset a decline in newsprint and pulp exports caused by non-tariff trade barriers in several countries and the closure of several Quebec mills. "Quebec is one of Canada's more diversified export economies, both in terms of what it sells and where it sells," said Hall. "That said, most of the growth this year and next will come from the United States, where the economy is showing no signs of slowing down."
  11. http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/montreal/Number+Quebecers+leaving+province+rise/9360879/story.html BY MARIAN SCOTT, THE GAZETTE JANUARY 7, 2014 8:05 PM A total of 28,439 people moved from Quebec to another province from January to September 2013. In most cases, Quebec’s loss was Ontario’s gain, with two out of three ex-Quebecers moving to Ontario. Photograph by: Peter Redman , National Post MONTREAL - The number of Quebecers heading down the 401 is on the rise, partial statistics for 2013 suggest. Departures from Quebec to other provinces rose to their highest level this century in the first nine months of 2013, according to the Canadian Institute for Identities and Migration. Statistics are not available yet for the final three months of the year. A total of 28,439 people moved from Quebec to another province from January to September 2013 — the highest number of departures for that period in any year since 2000. In most cases, Quebec’s loss was Ontario’s gain, with two out of three ex-Quebecers moving to Ontario, one in four to Alberta and just under one in ten to British Columbia, according to quarterly demographic estimates released by Statistics Canada in December. Quebec had a net loss of 11,887 residents due to interprovincial migration (departures minus arrivals) in the 12 months from October 2012 to September 2013, compared to a loss of 7,700 people in the corresponding period of 2011-12 and a loss of 4,394 in 2010-11. The rise in departures corresponds with the election of the Parti Québécois in September 2012 — but there is no evidence the political situation is a contributing factor, said Jack Jedwab, the institute’s executive vice-president.“It’s too early to say,” he said. “I would argue it’s more about our economy,” Jedwab said. “These numbers have a very recessionary look to them, at a time when we’re not in a recession.” Jedwab said the loss of residents sounds a warning signal. “Significant population losses have a negative effect on our economy,” he said. The rise in out-migration is not related to the divisive debate over the PQ government’s proposed charter of values, Jedwab said, since the departures occurred before the charter was unveiled. A National Assembly committee will commence hearings on the charter Jan. 14. But Jedwab said if the trend continues, the hypothesis that political angst is spurring departures would deserve a second look. “If it persists into the next quarter, we’ve got to start thinking non-economic considerations are at work here,” he said. The PQ government’s focus on identity issues has decreased the comfort level of some members of cultural minorities, particularly the values charter, which proposes to bar all public sector workers from wearing religious garb like the Muslim head scarf, Jewish skullcap or Sikh turban. In September, an Ontario hospital published recruitment ads aimed to capitalize on the controversy. A photo of a female health worker wearing a hijab (head scarf) bore the caption: “We don’t care what’s on your head. We care what’s in it.” Aaron Lazarus, director of communications at Lakeridge Health in Bowmanville, Ont., east of Toronto, said the hospital received several job applications from doctors, nurses and other health professionals from Quebec in response to the ads. But Michel Leblanc, president and CEO of the Montreal Board of Trade, warned against jumping to the conclusion that the current political climate could be causing people to leave Quebec. “What is worrisome is that we have a net loss of residents every year,” Leblanc said. “People have a tendency to migrate not only to places with better weather, but also to places where the economy is performing better,” he said. Leblanc said that while the recent increase in departures is cause for concern, it is much smaller than the massive exodus of anglophones from Quebec in the 1970s and ’80s. He called on the government to improve the integration of immigrants into the workforce and to lower taxation to retain residents. Statistics Canada’s quarterly demographic estimates showed Alberta — with a population of 4,060,700 in October 2013 — continues to lead the provinces in population growth, adding 137,703 new residents from October 2012 to September 2013, of whom 49,031 moved there from elsewhere in Canada. Ontario (population 13,585,900) had slower population growth, gaining 128,442 new residents from October 2012 to September 2013. Quebec, numbering 8,174,500 residents, added 67,385 new residents from October 2012 to September 2013, with immigration and the natural increase of the population compensating for out-migration. Previous studies have shown that about two-thirds of Quebec residents who move to other provinces are allophones — people whose first language is neither French nor English. [email protected]
  12. jesseps

    Bye Bye Dubai?

    (Courtesy of Inhabitat) Now thats a hell of a thing, build million dollar buildings just to destroy them
  13. Quebec universities report steep rise in regisration MONTREAL, Oct. 8 /CNW Telbec/ - For the fall semester 2009, 268,167 students registered at Quebec universities. Of this number, 181,316 registered full time and 86,851 registered part time. After a rise of at least 1% a year for the last three years, the total number of registrations rose steeply by 3.8% this year. The last increase of this scale goes back to 2003 and a rise of 4.2% Full time student registration saw a significant increase (6.2 %) at all levels of study (5.3 % at the undergraduate level, 10.6 % at the graduate level and 6.9 % at the postgraduate level). The number of new full time undergraduate registrants also rose by 7.3%, which will have a favourable impact on total registration in the common years. Part time registration saw a small decrease in numbers by 0.8%. Bishop's 6.5% -3.3% s.o. 6.3% A number of factors explain these increases. For example, the current economic recession has led to significant numbers of lost jobs, new programs have been implemented and international student recruitment has been stepped up. Another significant observation already noted in recent years is the presence of women at university. This year, women account for 57.6% of undergraduates, 55.5% of graduate students and 48.1% of postgraduate students. 57.7% of new full time undergraduates registered are women. We observe that a majority of undergraduate and graduate students are women and that that percentage at these levels has been relatively stable in recent years. However, we also note a steady increase at the postgraduate level. These findings come from the universities' preliminary registration statistics, excluding data from Télé-université which does not participate in data collection because its registration is a continuous process. Note that the situation varies greatly from one university to another. For this reason, the statistics for individual universities must be consulted to identify the exact causes of these variations in student registrations. All the data by institution as well as the concept identification used in the data collection methodology are available on the CREPUQ Web site: http://www.crepuq.qc.ca/spip.php?article102&lang=en CREPUQ includes all 18 Quebec universities. The organization acts as their voice in relations with government and sectors related to higher education. It also fosters coordination and collaboration between universities, is a research centre for university administrations, acts as a centre for coordination and joint service delivery, and is a resource centre and think tank for its members. CREPUQ Inscriptions aux trimestres d'automne 2008 et 2009 : variation en %, au 24 septembre de chaque année, du nombre de personnes inscrites selon le niveau d'études, du nombre de nouvelles personnes inscrites au 1er cycle à temps plein et de la masse de crédits au 1er cycle ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Variation Variation en % du nombre en % Variation de personnes - inscriptions Nouvelles en % temps plein et temps partiel personnes Masse -------------------------------------------- 1er cycle de Établissements 1er 2e 3e - temps crédits cycle cycle cycle Total plein 1er cycle ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Bishop's 6.5% -3.3% s.o. 6.3% 10.7% 6.1% Concordia 3.5% 11.0% 12.7% 4.6% 7.5% 2.6% Laval 2.2% 1.7% -2.3% 1.8% 5.9% 3.6% McGill 2.5% 1.8% 5.2% 2.6% 5.9% 0.6% Montréal +HEC+Poly 4.6% 5.6% 5.8% 4.8% 8.4% 5.4% Montréal 4.9% 4.6% 4.2% 4.8% 9.6% 5.8% HEC Montréal 0.7% 7.1% 2.1% 2.1% -3.6% -0.3% Polytechnique 10.6% 9.3% 16.0% 10.8% 18.0% 12.5% Sherbrooke 2.0% 26.8% 4.4% 9.2% 7.5% -0.5% Université du Québec * 2.5% 4.0% 5.2% 2.8% 7.6% 3.1% UQAC 5.7% -0.1% -5.3% 4.5% 13.4% 7.6% UQAM -0.5% -2.6% 1.4% -0.7% 3.9% 0.9% UQAR 6.1% 4.3% 7.4% 5.9% -0.6% 3.5% UQAT 1.9% 23.1% 31.4% 5.1% 3.0% -1.4% UQO 2.5% 17.2% 80.9% 5.9% 17.9% 4.4% UQTR 7.7% 9.6% 3.6% 7.8% 12.2% 5.6% ENAP s.o. 2.1% 31.1% 2.7% s.o. s.o. ÉTS 6.3% 34.9% 22.4% 10.0% 16.2% 8.4% INRS s.o. -5.0% 2.1% -1.3% s.o. s.o. ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Ensemble des univer- sités * 3.1% 7.0% 4.5% 3.8% 7.3% 3.0% -------------------------------------------------------------------------