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Found 47 results

  1. Hey everyone, Last summer I came across some videos on YouTube of tourists filming their experiences in the city - some were really great, and it was nice seeing the city from someone elses perspective, especially people who had never been here before. I started saving the ones I really liked. A few weeks ago Tourisme Montreal started releasing their ads for the 375th celebrations. Here are the first two: Une ville qu'on aime, ca se fete. - YouTube Honestly, what the fuck? Lequipe de hockey le plus titree? Des ruelles pleines de vie? Im so tired of them painting the city with such a shallow brush. Theyve never properly captured the spirit of Montreal. And the Toronto one? Cringe. So, I've been working on this for a little while. Below is a link to a short film I made and posted to YouTube today. Nearly all of the footage is from Tourists/YouTubers/Vloggers. If Tourisme Montreal can't explain our city to the world, maybe outsiders can. I used the music from Tourisme Montreal's first ad.* This one features only English-speaking tourists. Ive saved a bunch of French vlogs as well; when I get time Ill make one in French. I have some truly incredible footage for that one. Let me know what you think - share it, send it wherever and to whoever you like. Maybe we can get it to go viral, and get some attention from people who are wondering what city to check out next. Because it is mostly amateur footage, Ive added subtitles in case you can't understand some of the lines.
  2. There's heavy renovation inside and outside of this beautiful old building which now houses Charcos and Smoke's Poutinerie. Condos? Rental? Who knows. At least it's getting a new life. They did a fair bit of demolition to put in windows (and what I assume will be balconies). Here's what it looked like last summer.
  3. The fine Montreal art of being happy with what you have ARTHUR KAPTAINIS, The Gazette Published: Saturday, August 18 Almost everything was wonderful last Saturday - the weather, the music, the charity, the skyline. The sound? Well, what do you want? Percival Molson Stadium was built for football, not for music. There might be room for sonic improvement next summer, if I may jump to the reasonable conclusion that a concert by the Montreal Symphony Orchestra under the auspices of the Montreal Alouettes, with or without Kent Nagano, is now an annual event. One point of departure would be a shell that projects sound rather than a tent that contains it. Of course, there are certain sonic variables beyond the control of the MSO or the Als. The Royal Victoria Hospital is nearby, with its mamoth ventilation units. A two-hour shutdown of hospital air conditioning would be very nice, but perhaps too much to ask. Imperfect Acoustics: Kent Nagano and the Montreal Symphony Orchestra in last weekend's charity concert in Molson Stadium. While I mused over the problems and possible solutions it occurred to me that Montreal does not have a good, permanent outdoor summer concert facility. It is an odd situation considering that the city appears to experience more outdoor summer concerts than any other city on Earth. Where to install it? There is a mountain and a Chalet, the esplanade of which is haunted by ghosts as formidable as Leonard Bernstein, who conducted the MSO there in 1944 and 1945. In the 1950s Alexander Brott developed a rival operation called Dominion Concerts under the Stars. To build an amphitheatre anywhere on the mountain, however, would likely involve the felling of trees, an idea that now creates fierce opposition regardless of the benefit. Furthermore, the Montreal International Jazz Festival and Les Francofolies are strongly integrated into the centre of the city and Place des Arts. There are idle lots in that neighbourhood, some formerly earmarked for the development of a Place du Festival. But as the destruction of the Spectrum suggests, few downtown developers view the performing arts as a priority. And even a radical arts freak would have to concede the essential oddness of a deep-downtown outdoor concert venue that is vacant nine months a year. To build something as fine as the Lanaudière Amphitheatre within the city limits would also have the regrettable effect of siphoning off thousands of listeners from Lanaudière itself. Perhaps the solution to this problem, among others, is not to worry about it. Russell Johnson, the American acoustician who died last week, was an international figure famed for his concert halls in Birmingham, Lucerne and Dallas. But his Artec Consultants firm had a disproportionate influence in Canada. The Domaine Forget in Charlevoix - frequently used as a recording facility - is an Artec design, as is Jack Singer Concert Hall in Calgary, the Chan Cultural Centre on the campus of the University of British Columbia, the Thunder Bay Community Auditorium, the Weston Recital Hall in Toronto, the hall of the Festival of the Sound in Ontario cottage country and the Bayreuth copy that is the Raffi Armenian Theatre of the Centre in the Square in Kitchener. The Francis Winspear Centre in Edmonton is thought by many to be the best of all modern Canadian concert spaces. But perhaps Johnson's most astounding contribution to the cause of good acoustics in Canada was his transformation of the notorious dead space of Roy Thomson Hall in Toronto into a vibrant home for the long-suffering Toronto Symphony Orchestra. "That was easy," I remember his telling me at the 2002 reopening, with a shrug. The essense of the solution was reducing the interior volume with bulkheads. Sure it was easy - for someone with Johnsons's mix of spatial instinct, musical perception and pure science. Johnson long harboured a desire to build a new hall for the MSO. It appears he will realize it posthumously. The Quebec government chose Artec as the acoustical consultant for the project even before launching the competition to seek an architect. Diamond Schmitt Architects, one of the firms in the running for the MSO hall design, has won a "Good Design is Good Business" citation from BusinessWeek and Architectural Record magazines for the Four Seasons Centre in Toronto, a facility often referred to simply as the opera house. It was one of 10 projects cited from a competitive pool of 96 projects from nine countries. This common-sense award honours "architects and clients who best utilize design to achieve strategic objectives," according to Helen Walters, editor of innovation and design for BusinessWeek.com. My sense is that it serves as a counterweight to the ultraflamboyant designs that tend to capture headlines. The CAMMAC music centre in the Laurentians has also received an honourable mention from the Prix de l'Ordre des architectes du Québec 2007 for its new music pavillion. There will be a celebration at the site on Sept. 5. Love it or not, Place des Arts is active during the summer. Carnegie Hall - despite its prestige and air-conditioned presence at Seventh Ave. and 57th St. - is completely dark through the summer of 2007 and much of September. By October, however, the place is humming. The MSO used to occupy an October weekend under Charles Dutoit. During the coming season the orchestra will give one performance in the New York temple, on Saturday, March 8. Nagano conducts a program of Debussy (Le Martyre de Saint Sébastien: Symphonic Fragments), Tchaikovsky (Violin Concerto), Unsuk Chin (a new work) and Scriabin (The Poem of Ecstasy). All these selections are in keeping with the orchestra's former Franco-Russian reputation. If you wait six days you can then hear the Philadelphia Orchestra under its chief conductor - Charles Dutoit - in an even more MSO-ish program of Bartok (The Miraculous Mandarin Suite), Debussy (Nocturnes) and Holst (The Planets).
  4. Montreal's tempest in a beer cup A summertime deal between Labatt and the city's Gay Village raises questions about private interests dominating public spaces From Tuesday's Globe and Mail August 5, 2008 at 3:57 AM EDT MONTREAL — Stéphanie Dagenais didn't mind the Bud Light parasols and cups she was forced to use on her restaurant patio in Montreal's Gay Village. It's when the brewery started telling her Bud Light had to go in those plastic cups that the manager of Kilo bristled. "I think it's an aggressive way of doing a sponsorship," said Ms. Dagenais, who was forced to sell the beer under an exclusive deal struck between Labatt, which brews the beer in Canada, and the Gay Village business improvement group. The business association sold the right to sell beer on 54 new patios along a stretch of Ste-Catherine Street to Labatt, part of a summer-long festival that will see cars banished from the street. Owners say the $100,000 deal came with minimum sales quotas for each bar and restaurant, including a healthy sample of Bud Light. Patrons at a bar on Ste-Catherine Street in Montreal drink Molson Export out of the Bud Light cups required through Labatt’s sponsorship of the area. (John Morstad for The Globe and Mail) The Globe and Mail The deal irks restaurateurs like Ms. Dagenais, who doesn't sell much beer at her small restaurant, best known for tasty desserts, and others who try to tempt palates with fine dining, wine and specialty ales. A representative of the business group even suggested Bud Light is a popular beer among gays in the United States. While the banishment of cars from the street has been good for many businesses and great for pedestrians, the sponsorship is triggering a broader tempest in a beer cup over how much control private enterprises should have over public space. "I guess everything has a price," said Ms. Dagenais, who has several cases of Bud Light collecting dust. "But should it be that way? I don't think so, but it seems to be the way we work in North America." Christopher DeWolf, a writer for Spacing Montreal, an urban affairs website affiliated with the Toronto magazine Spacing, questions how corporate interests were allowed to take over a public street. "The closure to cars has created a destination, it creates an ambience that is impossible with cars," Mr. DeWolf said. "But here you have a product foisted on merchants and their customers. It raises the question of how far we should allow private interests to have such control over our public spaces. I think it's a burden on merchants and it restricts public choice." Bernard Plante, director of the Gay Village business association, said the deal is no different than exclusive beer rights negotiated at other city venues. He pointed to the privately owned Bell Centre where only Molson beer is sold. Mr. Plante brushed aside complaints about the use of public space, saying his business group is provincially legislated and democratically run. "These are the decisions we made on behalf of businesses on the street," Mr. Plante said. Merchants could shed the restraints of sponsorship when the deal runs out after the summer of 2009, he added. But they will have to agree to pay for the street closing, including the cost of street decor and rent to the city for having patios on public streets and sidewalks. Across North America, summer festivals run by private entities take over parks and streets, often with exclusive rights to allow access and to sell products. Many of the examples are more intrusive than the Montreal beer sponsorship. In one infamous example in the United States, Washington's National Mall was fenced off for a Pepsi product launch and concert - a 2003 scene described by the Project for Public Spaces as "singularly shocking for its sheer scope and audacity." Steve Davies, a vice-president of the New York-based group that encourages sensible integration of private business in public spaces, says sponsors get in trouble when they start constraining normal commercial activity. "It goes too far when they use a sponsorship to start telling dozens of private businesses what to do on public land over an entire summer," Mr. Davies said. In Montreal, big chunks of major downtown streets are regularly closed to traffic for short periods for everything from the Jazz Festival to Just for Laughs. The Gay Village pedestrian mall will last 2½ months. Mr. DeWolf said Montreal has one big thing right: The city usually emphasizes free public access, even if access to products like food and drink are often restricted. Labatt officials could not be reached yesterday. But Jean-Luc Raymond, owner of La Planète, which specializes in international cuisine, says he's noticed a little more flexibility from his brewery representative since the controversy broke out. Mr. Raymond has managed to get a little more of the fashionable Stella Artois and a little less Bud Light. "The Bud Light is still languishing," he said, "but I'm not like some others who have to try to sell Bud Light and cheesecake."
  5. Air Canada Increases Israel Service with a New Non-Stop Route from Montreal and Daily Flights from Toronto - Feb 13, 2017 MONTREAL, Feb. 13, 2017 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada announced today a significant expansion in services between Canada and Israel, with the introduction of a seasonal non-stop service between Montreal and Tel Aviv and an increase in its current Toronto-Tel Aviv non-stop service to a daily frequency year-round. With the new services beginning this summer – a 28 per cent capacity increase over summer 2016 – Air Canada will be the airline offering the most seats and frequencies between Canada and Israel. "Air Canada is the leader in the Canada-Israel market, which we have now served for 22 years. Today we are pleased to step up our capacity in response to the increased demand in business, leisure and cultural travel between both countries. As of June 2017, Air Canada will be launching a new seasonal non-stop service between Montreal and Tel Aviv, strengthening our hub in Montreal, which will also offer convenient connections throughout Canada and the U.S.," said Calin Rovinescu, President and Chief Executive of Air Canada. "This new service also reflects Air Canada's ongoing international expansion strategy, from which Montreal is deriving significant benefits. This month Air Canada will launch new service to Shanghai from the city and for next summer we have already announced new routes to Algiers, Marseille, Reykjavík and Dallas from Montreal," said Mr. Rovinescu. "In the same week as the inauguration of a non-stop Air Canada service to Shanghai, it is with pride today that we welcome a new international link with Tel Aviv. This important investment demonstrates the vitality of our city and Montreal's relevance as a North American aviation hub. This new air link by Air Canada will facilitate travel and trade between our two cities and countries. Coming only a few months after Montreal's trade mission to Israel, this new route is a concrete example of the strength of the economic, family and community ties that unite us," said Denis Coderre, Mayor of Montreal. Toronto's current service will increase this summer to daily from six days a week while the new Montreal-Tel Aviv service will operate twice weekly from June 22 to October 16, 2017. The Montreal flight will be operated with a 292-seat Airbus A330-300 aircraft with three cabins of service, including Air Canada's International Business Class cabin, featuring 27 Executive Pods with 180- degree lie-flat seats all configured for direct aisle access. The Premium Economy cabin has 21 seats that offer generous personal space, wider seats and extra legroom and recline, as well as premium meals, complimentary bar service and priority check-in and baggage delivery at the airport. The Economy cabin has 244 seats providing comfortable personal space and a state-of-the-art individual on-demand entertainment system. All flights are timed for convenient connections with Air Canada's extensive domestic and transborder network. Tickets for the new Montreal-Tel Aviv service will be available for sale beginning Wednesday, February 15, 2017, subject to final government approval. * Flight Departs Arrives Day of Week AC082 Montreal 18:35 Tel Aviv 12:15 + 1 day Thursday, Sunday AC083 Tel Aviv 13:55 Montreal 18:20 Monday, Friday *
  6. not a big loss, but in favor of YYZ-BUD non-stop. So no YUL-PSA, YUL-BUD for Summer 2016.
  7. YUL-Barcelona increased to 4 weekly frequencies (from 3) YUL-Venezia increased to 3 weekly (from 2) YUL-Nice increased to 4 weekly (from 3) Total number of international daily departures in Summer 2016: 11
  8. http://www.aircanada.com/en/offers/air/newroutes_rouge/newroutes_rouge.html?icid=fl|achome|newroutes_rouge|caen|151208|txt#YUL-NA Always wanted to see Miami go year round! Mexico City now goes 5x weekly instead of 4.
  9. Personally, I always love the 744, especially since we're seeing fewer and fewer of them. But, I really love seeing the 788 and looking forward to the 789. Hopefully we'll see more of them from AC, as well as the scheduled visits from BA and RAM. What's on your menu?
  10. before you all get excited, Swiss is going to put the 777 on YUL next summer for pilot training reasons only! With 62 business class seats, this airplane is not meant for Montreal for our market. Effective Aug 30 2016, it will return to normal year-round A330-300 operations. http://airlineroute.net/2015/07/09/lx-77w-s16update1/
  11. http://spacingmontreal.ca/2010/05/25/parc-lahaie-transformation-underway/ Résultat du parc Lahaie: C'est très laid ! deux tables dans le milieu, c'est le seul truc qu'ils ont trouvé à installer ? Je crois qu'il serait mieux de détruire la rue si ont veut vraiment la transformer en place publique. Je laisse Étienne vous présenter ses rendus qui sont extra !
  12. Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/entertainment/Lambert+shouts+enough/3317503/story.html#ixzz0uhaLT8LV
  13. "Better to have a short life that is full of what you like doing than a long life spent in a miserable way." - ALAN WATTS Salut, j'a fais une petite vidéo et je vous la partage. Suivez moi sur instagram- @donpicturehd https://www.instagram.com/donpicturehd/ Equipement utilisé: Principalement le Nikon D3400 LENSE: AF-P DX NIKKOR 18–55 mm f/3.5–5.6. Ça serait apprécier si vous vous abonnez à ma chaîne youtube. N'hésitez pas à commenter, merci!
  14. AeroMexico in summer 2017 season will further strengthen service to Canada, as planned service increase to Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver will all move to May 2017, while planned new frequency operating on permanent basis, instead of seasonal (June – August 2017). Mexico City – Montreal eff 01MAY17 Increase from 11 to 13 weekly. Originally planned increase to 14 weekly from 20JUN17 remains unchanged, and will now be permanent, instead of summer seasonal AM680 MEX0101 – 0715YUL 7S8 D AM636 MEX1551 – 2217YUL 7S8 x2 AeroMexico further boosts Canada service in S17 :: Routesonline
  15. http://inside-digital.blog.lonelyplanet.com/2011/06/22/is-this-the-worlds-best-summer-city/ click the link to see the ranking
  16. As you can see from the following pictures, this handsome 1950 building (mostly known for its Mourelatos) has cleaned graffitis, new doorway, kicked out the shady dance school. I would bet this will be student residences / apartments, but they might have to get it rezoned? July 22nd 2013: Summer 2012:
  17. Cataclaw

    Musique?

    Qu'est ce que vous écoutez? What's your favorite artist/band? Or even.. qu'est ce que vous écoutez en ce moment? I'm listening to Don Henley - Boys of Summer at the moment Before that, Dirty South - Let it go (axwell remix) Favorite artists/DJs: Opeth, Bruce Springsteen, Seal, Armin van Buuren Favorite album: Opeth - Blackwater Park
  18. jesseps

    Noise laws

    I am curious does anyone know if Beaconsfield has any bilaws concerning noise levels. I am planning on having some parties outdoor in the summer with djs and stuff, plus tons of people probably. Or should I just call up Beaconsfield city hall and ask them?
  19. I ended up asking this girl I like out, she's known for a while now. Her answer was something I did not really expect "I am not really in the mood for a relationship right now. Do not get me wrong I do like you, just maybe in a few months." Plus she said something else like "we can still take it slow." I have known her for a good 3 years now I think, we only started actually hanging out in November. In December when I was on vacation she asked me to go to New York with her, which we are in August. We have already made out twice in the past week give or take. So should I just keep going at the pace its going and just wait. Thing is I sort of do understand her answer seeing its summer and I guess she wants to have some fun and stuff. One thing would this be some sort of "open relationship" or something or its just whatever now and hope it works out in the next few months :egads: PLUS I am not that type of guy to just fool around. I must be the only idiot at 22 that wants an actual relationship :sad:
  20. According to my calculations, as of today’s announcement by Air China, and excluding charter-type flights, next summer is already looking very positive. 1. Air China is doubling its number of weekly flights to Beijing from 3 to 6. 2. Aero-Mexico is adding 4 weekly flights to Mexico City for a total of 11 weekly. 3. AC is introducing a daily flight to Shanghai, 4. AC is introducing 4 weekly flights to Alger. 5. AC to Casablanca will now be daily (an addition of 3 weekly) 6. Tunisair is adding 1 flight a week to Tunis for a total of 3 weekly 7. WOW will be going daily to Reykjavik, an addition of 3 weekly flights. 8. Air Algerie is adding 2 weekly flights to Alger for a weekly total now of 10 9. Air Algerie is introducing 2 weekly flights to Oran. I count a total of 244 weekly international flights now confirmed for this coming summer, which is 32 more than last summer. This includes 24 scheduled daily flights; up from 20 dailies last summer. So far there is no news of cancelations or reductions. Surely we can expect even further good news between now and summer!
  21. According to Qatar airlines today, they plan on adding additional routes to Montreal next summer. They will be using the 777-300ER with 358 seats. Currently they have 3 flights a week. Does anyone know how many additional flights they will add?
  22. I.H.T. SPECIAL REPORT: SMART CITIES http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/18/business/global/hip-cities-that-think-about-how-they-work.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&sq=montreal,%20auckland,%20berlin&st=cse&scp=1 By CHRISTOPHER F. SCHUETZE Published: November 17, 2011 The story of young people, full of ambition, energy, skill and talent, moving to enticing cities that call to them like a siren’s song is as old as modern civilization. And in a world where national borders are easier to traverse, where more countries are joining the prosperous global middle class and where the cost of a one-way plane ticket is more affordable, young professionals probably have more cities to choose from than ever before. This survey is not based solely on quality of life, number of trees or the cost of a month’s rent. Instead, we examine some cities that aim to be both smart and well managed, yet have an undeniably hip vibe. Our pick of cities that are, in a phrase, both great and good: Montreal With its hearty French and North American mix, this city of 3.6 million has a real soul thanks to low living costs and long winter evenings. And it is no slouch when it comes to good food, hip culture, well-appointed museums and efficient transportation. Related With four major universities and plenty of bars, the nightlife in this bilingual city has a well-deserved reputation. Because the winters tend to be long and cold, the city possesses an extensive underground network connecting several downtown malls and a subterranean arts quarter. When spring finally does arrive, and snow is cleared from the many bike paths, the city puts out its 5,000 short-term-rental bicycles, known as Bixi. City-sponsored community gardens are sprouting around town, giving urbanites a chance to flex their green thumb. Montreal is an incredibly active town where festivals celebrating everything from jazz to Formula One dominate the city’s calendar during the summer. Thanks to Mount Royal, a large central park and cemetery that serves as cross-country, snowshoe and ice-skating terrain in the winter and becomes a verdant picnic ground and gathering spot in the summer, Montrealers never have to leave city limits.