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Found 38 results

  1. Il semble que depuis la fin 2014, Montréal est en train d'explorer la possibilité de recouvrir l'autoroute Décarie dans le secteur Namur/De la Savane. Il y aurait au moins 2 hypothèses à l'étude. L'étendue de ce potentiel recouvrement n'est pas mentionnée. http://www.seao.ca/OpportunityPublication/ConsulterAvis/DuJour?ItemId=1a3f81aa-ccb1-4046-9821-9ffa7f0254e2
  2. A friend of mine confirmed the other day that Peugeot is currently carrying out a feasibility study, with the help of Broccolini, for a new warehouse/plant in Vaudreuil. The facility may also include a test track. As of right now this is all very preliminary, but definitely something to follow closely! If anyone else has any information, please share it! (See picture for proposed location)*
  3. Canada to switch to plastic bills next year Last Updated: Saturday, March 6, 2010 | 2:19 PM ET CBC News They say money doesn't grow on trees. Well, the federal government has taken that adage to heart — it announced earlier this week that Canada's paper-cotton banknotes would be replaced by newly designed plastic ones next year. It's part of a plan to modernize and protect Canadian currency against counterfeiting. The new plastic bills, made from a polymer material, are harder to fake, recyclable, and two to three times more resistant to tearing, the Bank of Canada said. Australia has used polymer banknotes since the 1990s, and an Australian company will provide the material for Canada. Several other countries have adopted polymer banknotes including New Zealand, Vietnam and Romania. The new notes won't be in circulation until sometime in 2011. In the meantime, the central bank is keeping mum on what the new bills will look like. "I can't divulge that information because they will be issued in about 18 months — that's a long ways away," said Bank of Canada spokesperson Julie Girard. "We want to keep a little bit of information from potential counterfeiters so they don't get a leg up and start producing any counterfeits." CBC News wanted to get some local Canadians' impressions of the polymer bills. Reporter Sandra Abma took an Australian banknote and a classic cotton-paper Canadian bill and asked people on the streets of Ottawa to compare. The opinions were mixed. "It would be easier to lose, I think," said one woman, after rubbing her fingers on the polymer bill. "It's soft and smooth and it could slide out easier." "This feels like Monopoly money actually," said a young man. "It's like I took this out of a board game and then went to buy Timmy's with it." Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/ottawa/story/2010/03/06/ott-plastic-money.html#ixzz0hXA51DI4
  4. What happens with this skyscraper?¿ Is it a proposal, is it under construction or it was just another cancelled?¿ Please, add information and some renders or piuctures. It was a very interesting art deco builing, a good one for Montreal.
  5. Exclusive Business Class Travel Between Toronto and Montreal MONTREAL, Feb. 28, 2017 /CNW Telbec/ - Ufly, a new business class travel experience, announced today that it will sell exclusive flights between the Billy Bishop and Saint-Hubert airports from Monday to Friday, at a frequency of two round trips daily. Offering numerous advantages such as online bookings at a fixed rate, last minute boarding in addition to quick and easy access to aircrafts, Ufly and Pascan Aviation are every business traveler's dream. An accessible, exclusive and efficient service Ideal for frequent business flyers, Ufly truly demonstrates a full executive treatment: comfortable, exclusive and luxurious. Thanks to its unprecedented service offering, Ufly members can take advantage of a VIP lounge, a dedicated phone reservation line, a mobile application, and free parking near the priority security checkpoint and check-in. As a high-end luxury service provider, Ufly sells seats on private nine-seater Pilatus PC 12 planes, the safest on the market, equipped with comfortable, large leather seats that are operated by Pascan Aviation. Available on a member-only basis, Ufly proposes several membership types to meet every travelers' corporate budget allowances. Furthermore, ticket prices do not fluctuate throughout the year, allowing users to benefit from fixed rates that include snacks and beverages and an unlimited number of flights! For more information, go to uFly. About Ufly Launched in February 2017, Ufly sells tickets for Pascan Aviation between Saint-Hubert airport and Billy Bishop airport in Toronto, as well as between Saint-Hubert airport and Québec City, Val-d'Or and Bagotville. Ufly is primarily designed for business professionals and offers preferential access to planes operated by Pascan Aviation. The service is designed to dramatically reducing airport wait times. Members have access to an unlimited number of flights at a fixed rate. Ufly plans to offer more routes in the upcoming year. For more information, go to uFly.
  6. Developers & Chains ABOUT US Developers & Chains deals in business opportunities, not opportunities that you've missed out on. We specialize in futures, not histories. Developers & Chains is a subscription-only publication that focuses on retail and restaurant expansion across Canada. Developers & Chains is a subscription-only publication that concentrates on the growth and expansion aspects of the retail and restaurant industry across Canada, from British Columbia to Newfoundland. Each issue, and there are over 100 each year, includes information on new concepts and existing chains that have stated an interest in expansion and/or are showing signs of growth. And the reports include details on the companies, their needs and requirement along with the appropriate contacts. Developers & Chains issues also identify new shopping projects, malls and centres that are renovating, expanding or that simply have prime spaces that our subscribers may have available. Again, the issues include the leasing contacts, the uses they are seeking and where to contact them. There is more too. The publication keeps the subscribers aware of planned industry events and changes within the business. There are frequent reports on both retail and development sales and acquisitions, what companies are retaining which real estate-related suppliers and much, much more. Developers & Chains provides the type of leads and information that everyone in the business needs to make calculated decisions and it is all presented in a clear, factual, concise and timely manner that you can depend on. More important though, much of the leasing leads and company details are exclusive to the Developers & Chains’ E-News. They are available only in this publication. The information is exclusive in that it comes directly from our personal conversations with the principals or representatives of the featured companies. It’s almost as if you are there, sitting in on the conversation. Take a look through a recent issues of the Developers & Chains’ E-News. You will find details on new concepts seeking their first location and national chains looking for dozens of new units. You will learn, first hand, about planned entries into new markets. Whether it is a 150 square foot kiosk or a 30,000 square foot anchor tenant for your property, this is where you will meet them first. You will read about malls, centres and large format projects that have that ideal space, perfect for your next store. And you will ‘meet’ the people and companies involved. Oh yes, and the ‘editorial’ that ends every issue. Don’t take offence. It is just a tongue-in-cheek, maybe even irreverent, look at the business that we sometimes take a little too seriously. Sent from my SM-T330NU using Tapatalk
  7. www.e5pace.com Le résumé trimestriel unique en son genre d’Espace Montréal se démarque par ses rapports de premier plan sur le marché de l’immobilier commercial de la grande région de Montréal, ses entrevues, ses chroniques professionnelles et ses renseignements en matière de location. Le pouls de ce secteur dynamique est consulté dans chaque numéro d’Espace Montréal, une lecture incontournable attendue avec impatience par tout passionné du monde de l’immobilier commercial de Montréal. Industry leading reports, interviews, professional columns and market information are the hallmarks of Espace Montréal's unique quarterly roundup on commercial real estate in the greater Montréal area. The pulse of this dynamic industry comes to life in every issue of Espace Montréal - an eagerly awaited must-read publication for any aficionado of commercial real estate in Montréal.
  8. Traffic management APPlied logic Sep 13th 2011, 16:10 by The Economist online TRAFFIC lights are crucial tools for regulating traffic flow. They are not, however, perfect. Drivers exchange the gridlock that would happen at unmanaged junctions for a pattern of stop-go movement that can still be frustrating, and which burns more fuel than a smooth passage would. Creating such a smooth passage means adjusting a vehicle’s speed so that it always arrives at the lights when they are green. That is theoretically possible, but practically hard. Roadside signs wired to traffic lights can help get the message across a couple hundred metres from a junction, but such signs are expensive, and have not been widely deployed. Margaret Martonosi and Emmanouil Koukoumidis at Princeton University, and Li-Shiuan Peh at the Massachussets Institute of Technology, however, have an idea that could make the process cheaper and more effective. Instead of a hardwired network of signs, they propose to use mobile-phone apps. For a driver to benefit, he must load the team’s software, dubbed SignalGuru, into his phone and then mount it on a special bracket attached to the inside of his car’s windscreen, with the camera lens pointing forwards. SignalGuru is designed to detect traffic lights and track their status as red, amber or green. It broadcasts this information to other phones in the area that are fitted with the same software, and—if there are enough of them—the phones thus each know the status of most of the lights around town. Using this information, SignalGuru is able to calculate the traffic-light schedule for the region and suggest the speed at which a driver should travel in order to avoid running into red lights. Tests in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where five drivers were asked to follow the same route for three hours, and in Singapore, where eight drivers were asked to follow one of two routes for 30 minutes, revealed that SignalGuru was capable of predicting traffic-light activity with an accuracy of 98.2% and 96.3% respectively, in the two cities. This was particularly impressive because in Cambridge the lights shifted, roughly half-way through the test, from their off-peak schedule to their afternoon-traffic schedule, while in Singapore lights are adaptive, using detectors embedded under the road to determine how much traffic is around and thus when a signal should change. In neither case was SignalGuru fooled. Fuel consumption fell, too—by about 20%. SignalGuru thus reduces both frustration and fuel use, and makes commuting a slightly less horrible experience.
  9. Bonjour, Voici un projet dont j'ai très peu d'information, seulement une image provenant du livre : Montréal, son histoire, son architecture tome 2 de Guy Pinard page 45. Je n'ai pas trouvé de sujet semblable dans ce forum alors je vous le propose. En 1931, un architecte propose un nouvel Hôtel de ville et un nouveau centre des affaires à Montréal,: Si quelqu'un a des information supplémentaire sur ce projet, n'hésitez pas à le partager!!
  10. Article by FDI intelligence (financial times) Rankings: 1. New York City 2. Sao Paulo 3 Toronto 4.MONTREAL 5. Vancouver 6. Houston 7. Atlanta 8. San Francisco 9. Chicago 10. Miami "Canadian cities Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver ranked third, fourth and fifth, respectively, and performed particularly well in the attraction of knowledge-intensive FDI. All three locations were among the top 20 key destination and source cities for FDI. With the exception of New York, Montreal-based companies invested in more FDI projects than other city in the Americas region" "Business friendly Canada Placed in third, Montreal’s success lies in retaining and developing relationships with existing investments – data from fDi Markets shows that one in five FDI projects since 2003 were expansions. Montreal tops strategy list The prize for Best Major American City for FDI Strategy 2013/14 is awarded to Montreal. It beat 126 competitors across North and South America who submitted information regarding their FDI strategies. In its American Cities of the Future submission, economic development agency Montréal International stated that its economic development strategy has centred predominantly around high-tech clusters, and in particular aerospace, life sciences and health technologies, as well as information and communications technology (ICT). Elie Farah, vice-president of Investment Greater Montréal, says: “The year 2011 was one of the best for Montréal International in terms of attracting FDI since 2005. This is partially explained by the investments from Europe which, in the past two years, have become the main source of FDI in the region.” http://www.fdiintelligence.com/Locations/Americas/American-Cities-of-the-Future-2013-14
  11. http://www.wintercities.com/ On Facebook https://www.facebook.com/WinterCitiesInstitute Those who live and work in northern cities recognize the need for better planning and design. The sustainability of winter cities requires a creative approach that addresses the problems of snow and cold while enhancing the advantages, opportunities and beauty of the winter season. A positive approach benefits the attitudes of residents, and bolsters the community’s ability to attract new business and residents. The Winter Cities Institute was organized in 2008 to identify, promote and share the positive attributes of winter living, new concepts in architecture and urban design, and success stories from those places that are thriving in the north. The Institute was founded by Patrick Coleman, AICP, recognized for his work with the Livable Winter Cities Association (WCA). From 1982-2005, the WCA organized conferences, published books and the quarterly magazine “Winter Cities”. A totally volunteer staff made the WCA difficult to sustain and in the end it struggled with its mission. As Coleman incorporated winter enhancement strategies in his planning practice with multi-disciplinary design firms in Alaska and northern Michigan, he found enthusiastic reception to the idea of making winter a better time of year. “People are looking for answers to common winter problems and issues”, he said. “I experienced firsthand and heard from many the need for a source of information, networking and resources, and decided to launch the Institute as a web-based network and resource sharing project”. The Winter Cites Institute offers a place for those looking to improve the quality of life in wintertime and need information on what is being done in other northern places. Our members are from around the world and include: cities and towns architects planners engineers parks and recreation professionals economic development and tourism officials Welcome to the resources available on this site and consider joining the network to get even more benefits.
  12. Merci à MTLCity pour m'avoir aiguillé sur le sujet! http://w5.montreal.com/mtlweblog/?p=49437&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter http://vtdigger.org/2015/06/30/vermont-pbs-soaks-up-montreal-qulture/
  13. Nouveau projet de constructions Cartierville (Le sofia sur R-L est d'eux autre également) The Griffin on Murray is a new condominium project in the South West borough of Montreal. The plans, images and information will be available soon. Plus de détails à venir http://www.cartierville.ca/condos-projects-details.html?projetID=95
  14. http://www.cyberpresse.ca/actualites/regional/montreal/200908/25/01-895773-george-w-bush-donnera-une-conference-a-montreal.php http://montreal.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20090825/mtl_bush_090825/20090825/?hub=MontrealHome Damn! I hope I can get in some how. I wonder who does the inviting? I just hope that a bunch of leftists don't try and storm the place or something. It will make the city look terrible.
  15. What's the deal with that little park at the southeast corner of Sainte-Antoine and Place d'Armes/Saint-Urbain (next to La Presse)? It looks so nice yet every time I've passed by there (hundreds of times), the gates are locked! Is it a private park? If so, who owns it and who can go inside? Any information would be appreciated.
  16. The New York Times Printer Friendly Format Sponsored By June 8, 2008 Allez voir plus de photos sur le site: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/08/magazine/08mvrdv-t.html?_r=1&sq=montreal&st=nyt&oref=slogin&scp=1&pagewanted=all By DARCY FREY In the fall of 2002, a young Dutch architect named Winy Maas came to Yale to give a lecture on designing and building the 21st-century city, the challenges of which he illustrated by showing a 30-second video that could have been shot above any American metropolitan airport: a view of the tops of several buildings and then, as the camera rose, more and more buildings, more roads and bridges and asphalt lots, until an ugly concrete skin of low-rise development spread to all horizons. Maas was not the first architect to protest the unsightly sprawl that humans have left over much of the earth’s surface, but he may have been the first to suggest that we preserve what’s left of our finite planetary space by creating “vertical suburbias” — stacking all those quarter-acre plots into high-rise residential towers, each with its own hanging, cantilevered yard. “Imagine: It’s Saturday afternoon, and all the barbecues are running,” Maas said, unveiling his design for a 15-story building decked out with leafy, gravity-defying platforms. “You can just reach out and give your upstairs neighbor a beer.” He turned next to agriculture. Noting that the Dutch pork industry consumes huge swaths of land — Holland has as many pigs as people — Maas proposed freeing up the countryside by erecting sustainable 40-story tower blocks for the pigs. “Look — it’s a pork port,” he said, flashing images from PigCity, his plan for piling up the country’s porcine population and its slaughterhouses into sod-layered, manure-powered skyscrapers that would line the Dutch coast. Maas is the charismatic frontman for the Rotterdam-based architecture, urban-planning and landscape-design firm known as MVRDV, which brims with schemes for generating space in our overcrowded world. With his messy, teen-idol hair and untucked shirt, Maas strolled the stage extolling the MVRDV credo — maximize urban density, construct artificial natures, let data-crunching computers do the design work — while various mind-bending simulations played across the screen: skyscrapers that tilted and “kissed” on the 30th floor; highways that ran through lobbies and converted into “urban beaches”; all the housing, retail and industry for a theoretical city of one million inhabitants digitally compressed into the space of a three-mile-high cube. The Netherlands, prosperous and progressive, has long been one of the world’s leading exporters of architectural talent. By the mid-1990’s, not only Rem Koolhaas and his Office for Metropolitan Architecture but also a whole new generation of designers — MVRDV, West 8, UNStudio — were trying to enlarge Le Corbusier’s definition of architecture as the “magnificent play of volumes brought together under light” and arguing for a process driven by research, information and a greater social and environmental awareness. Fighting their battles not just building to building but on a sweeping, citywide scale, Holland’s architects and designers were, in the words of the Dutch culture minister, “heroes of a new age.” Still, paradigms tend to fall only under pressure, and at the start of the new millennium an audience at the Yale School of Architecture could be forgiven for greeting vertical suburbs, pig cities and the rest of MVRDV’s computer-generated showmanship with the same slack-jawed disbelief that once greeted Fritz Lang’s “Metropolis” or the 1909 Life magazine cartoon that promised an urban utopia of country villas perched atop Manhattan skyscrapers while double-decker airplanes whizzed through their atria. When Maas came to New Haven, MVRDV was barely 10 years old and had hardly built outside its native Holland. And yet there he was with his straight-faced scheme to “extend the globe with a series of new moons” — send up food-producing satellites that would orbit the earth three times a day. “Can you imagine,” he said with a boyish, science-fair enthusiasm that indulged no irony, “if we grew our tomatoes 10 kilometers high?” On the lecture-hall screen, New York’s skyline appeared just as the MVRDV satellite passed overhead, darkening Gotham with a momentary eclipse of the sun. Who were these Dutch upstarts? And in the so-called real world, would anything actually become of their grand, improbable visions? The 45 architects and designers who make up MVRDV (the name is formed by the surname initials of Mass and his two founding partners, Jacob van Rijs and Nathalie de Vries) work out of a converted, loftlike space in an old printing plant in Rotterdam, a dull but industrious port city whose historic districts were leveled by the Nazis and whose jagged skyline of new office towers and construction cranes attests to its still-restless effort to rebuild. Inside MVRDV, a liquid northern light pours through a wall of high arched windows, and the occasional cries of foghorns and seagulls confirm its location just blocks from the city’s main shipping lane. But otherwise, the mostly 30-something architects who sit with a slouching intensity at rows of long communal tables, surfing Google Earth or manipulating blue-foam architectural models, seem to have their minds in other places. “Now here’s a nice project of ours,” Jacob van Rijs said, leading me over to a small cardboard model for a library near Rotterdam when I visited the firm this spring. Because zoning laws required that the library not exceed the height of the town’s steeple, MVRDV designed it like a barn and filled its spacious interior with a continuous spiral of book-bearing walls leading to a bar and a fireplace at the top. “It’s like a spatialization of a library filing system. Every title will be visible, so you won’t have to know what you’re looking for — you can just come in and browse.” Van Rijs — menschy, informal, with a skill for taking Maas’s flights of rhetoric and bringing them helpfully down to earth — guided me on to the next model, this one for a new housing block in a generic, somewhat featureless region of the Netherlands; from a distance the housing block will appear as giant letters spelling out the region’s name. “It’s like the Hollywood sign — you’ll see our building and instantly know where you are.” And on to the models for an arched, open-air market hall whose ribs are formed by apartment units (“so you can call down from your kitchen window and ask your husband to pick up some fruit”); the design-your-own mountain grottos with interchangeable rooms for a developer in Taiwan (“they’re like customizable Native American caves”); the new soccer stadium in Rotterdam that, because it replaces an older one fondly known as the Tub, will sit like a dish in the Maas River. “You know, what’s the best place for a tub? So we put it in the river!” Van Rijs gave a giddy laugh. “Some projects just make you happy.” Maas and van Rijs, who both worked for Koolhaas, and de Vries, who practiced with the Delft-based Mecanoo, formed MVRDV in 1991 after their design for a Berlin housing project won the prestigious Europan competition for architects under 40. Holland has always been a good place to think creatively about space, with its congested countryside (16 million people squeezed into an area the size of two New Jerseys), its faith in planning and the democratic welfare state and its keen appreciation for land that comes from having reclaimed two-thirds of its own from the edge of the North Sea. Meanwhile, young designers were hoping the economic boom and housing shortage of the 1990s would give them the chance to build domestically on a large scale. Still, two years after they formed MVRDV, Maas, van Rijs and de Vries were struggling to find work and practicing out of makeshift offices (during meetings with prospective clients, they’d sometimes recruit friends to keep the phones ringing and wander through in suits) when a Dutch public broadcasting company, VPRO, approached them about a possible new headquarters in Hilversum. The project’s constraints were formidable. VPRO’s 350 employees — “creative types,” van Rijs says; “individualistic,” de Vries adds; “a settlement of anarchists with an obnoxious attitude toward corporate identity” Maas concludes — were then spread out among several buildings, enjoying their fiefs and the company’s culture of noncommunication. Even if a new headquarters could bring them all under one roof, it was impossible to predict how the employees would actually use the building, given their fluid work patterns and chaotic organizational hierarchies. “The mandate was: How can we get them to start communicating with each other?” Maas says. “And the answer was: By putting them in a box.” Villa VPRO, which became the defining project of MVRDV’s early career, is a densely constructed, five-story box — a “hungry box,” as one critic called it — with an endlessly flowing and adaptable interior that renders in spatial form the company’s anarchic spirit. MVRDV created a concrete labyrinth of winding stairs, twisting ramps and narrow bridges; a continuous surface of stepped and slanted planes with no real walls, just colored-glass partitions so that sunlight could penetrate into the depths of its compact terrain. “Clearly, VPRO was a social-engineering project,” Maas says. “We built a vertical battlefield for the users, one place where they could all meet and argue and find out how to behave. Because of all the hills, slabs and stairs, they were forced to maneuver through the building. Some people hated it — they lost their way, they were overwhelmed by their colleagues. Others loved it. But they all had to deal with each other. I like that. That’s part of life.” A year later, MVRDV took social engineering to a new level when it won a commission to represent Holland in Expo 2000 in Hanover, Germany. Expos are notorious excuses for creating second-rate architecture, piling up dreary national pavilions and Disneyfied theme parks around which crowds circulate in a candy-consuming stupor. At the Hanover expo, MVRDV stole the show with another vertical confection — this time a six-story tower of stacked and sustainable artificial Dutch landscapes that included an oak forest, a meadow of potted flowers, ersatz concrete sand dunes for purifying irrigation water and a “polder landscape” of dyke-protected turf powered by wind turbines spinning away on the roof. The MVRDV pavilion was, one critic wrote, “science class with the chutzpah of Coney Island.” Another predicted that it would “go down as one of the few truly great pieces of expo architecture,” alongside Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion and Moshe Safdie’s Habitat flats at the Montreal expo. Visitors lined up for hours to climb through what was inevitably dubbed the “Dutch Big Mac.” But beyond its playful innovation, MVRDV had lofty aspirations for its pavilion, hoping that it would carry the optimistic (and very Dutch) message that in the face of extreme population densities and the craving for open land, you could actually manufacture space — even create an artificial nature out of thin air — by condensing your landscapes on the floors of a building and reproducing them endlessly toward the sky. “The Dutch population is essentially antiurban,” de Vries says. “Therefore as architects in Holland we have a special responsibility to make living in cities and under dense circumstances not just habitable but preferable.” “It was sort of a test case,” Maas says. “At a time when urbanism is still dominated by ‘zoning,’ which is a very two-dimensional approach, we wanted to know: can we extend our surfaces? Can we develop an urbanism that enters the third dimension?” The Hanover pavilion was “a utopian formula born of necessity to allow the unlimited creation of new real estate,” wrote the critic Holger Liebs. It was “a practical model for the reinvention of the world.” At the architectural library at the Delft University of Technology, there’s a copy of a 736-page book by MVRDV called “Farmax: Excursions on Density,” which is a hodgepodge of essays, transcripts, photos, computer designs, graphs and charts, all examining the growing suburban “grayness” of the Dutch landscape and proposing different solutions for saving the pastoral landscape by “carrying density to extremes.” So many students have borrowed, read and plundered that copy of “Farmax” that it had to be pulled from circulation and has sat in a state of complete disintegration inside a kind of glass vitrine. When I mentioned this to van Rijs, he laughed and said: “Yeah, I’ve seen that. Our book is like a museum piece. Isn’t that fun?” While projects like VPRO and the Hanover pavilion were leading to design commissions in Copenhagen, Madrid, Paris, Tokyo and China’s Sichuan province, MVRDV was also reaching outside the realm of established architectural practice by producing a series of theoretical exercises — books, films, exhibitions, even computer games — that amounted to an ongoing propaganda war on behalf of the firm’s radical ideas about space. After “Farmax,” MVRDV put out another doorstop manifesto, “KM3: Excursions on Capacities,” which warned that if the global population “behaved with U.S.-citizen-like consumption,” another four earths would be required to sustain it. In the exhibit 3D City, they pushed ever upward, advocating giant stacking cities that, as MVRDV breathlessly described them, exist “not only in front, behind or next to you, but also above and below. In short a city in which ground-level zero no longer exists but has dissolved into a multiple and simultaneous presence of levels where the town square is replaced by a void or a bundle of connections; where the street is replaced by simultaneous distribution and divisions of routes and is expanded by elevators, ramps and escalators. . . .” Perhaps MVRDV’s most ambitious theoretical exercise was the traveling computer installation they called MetaCity/Datatown. Predicting that globalism and an exploding planetary population will push certain regions throughout the world into continuous urban fields, or megacities, MVRDV conceived a hypothetical city called Datatown, designed solely from extrapolations of Dutch statistics. (“It is a city that wants to be explored only as information; a city that knows no given topography, no prescribed ideology, no representation, no context. Only huge, pure data.”) According to its creators, Datatown was a self-sufficient city with the population of the United States (250 million) crammed into an area the size of Georgia (60,000 square miles), making it the densest place on earth. MVRDV then subjected this urban Frankenstein to 21 scenarios to see how they would affect the built environment: What if all the residents of Datatown wanted to live in detached houses? What if they preferred urban blocks? What could be done with the waste? (Build 561 ski resorts.) What kind of city park would be needed? (A million Central Parks stacked up over 3,884 floors.) “The seas, the oceans (rising as a result of global warming), the polar icecaps, all represent a reduction in the territory available for the megacity. Does that mean that we must colonize the Sahel, the oceans or even the moon to fulfill our need for air and space, to survive? Or can we find an intelligent way to expand the capacities of what already exists?” On one level, MetaCity/Datatown was a game and a provocation — architecture as a kind of thought experiment: can the urban landscape be reduced to a string of ones and zeroes? Is what we think of as outward reality nothing more than the physical manifestation of information? But MetaCity/Datatown was also a serious investigation: by translating the chaos of the contemporary city into pure information — or, as MVRDV called it, a datascape — and then showing the spatial consequences of that datascape through computer-generated designs, MVRDV set out to reveal how our collective choices and behaviors come to mold our constructed environments. “These datascapes show that architectural design in the traditional sense only plays a very limited role,” Bart Lootsma, an architectural historian, writes in one of many essays inspired by the exhibit. “It is the society, in all its complexities and contradictions, that shapes the environment in the most detailed way, producing ‘gravity fields’ in the apparent chaos of developments, hidden logics that eventually ensure that whole areas acquire their own special characteristics — even at a subconscious level.” Lootsma cites a number of these invisible forces — market demands precipitating a “slick” of houses-with-gardens in the Netherlands, political constraints generating “piles” of dwellings on the outskirts of Hong Kong, the cultural preference for white brick causing a “white cancer” of housing estates in the Dutch province of Friesland. These are “the ‘scapes’ of the data behind it,” he writes. Moreover, to the extent that MVRDV approaches architecture not as a conventional expression of aesthetics, materials and form but as an almost scientific investigation into the social and economic forces that influence our constructions, the datascapes were also a dry run for the firm’s own built work. That work, says Aaron Betsky, the former director of the Netherlands Architecture Institute and a longtime MVRDV-watcher, is really an ongoing project of “giving shape to those zeroes and ones,” of making the conceptual real, of turning abstract information into concrete form. When MVRDV begins a project, it starts by assembling information on all the conceivable factors that could play a role in the site’s design and construction — everything from zoning laws, building regulations and technical requirements to client wishes, climatic conditions and the political and legal history of the site. Architects often view these rules and regulations as bureaucratic foils to their creativity. MVRDV sees them as the wellspring of invention. In fact, believing that subjective analysis and “artistic” intuition can no longer resolve the complex design problems posed by the ever-metastisizing global city, the architects sometimes use a home-built software program called Functionmixer. When loaded with all the parameters of a particular construction project, Functionmixer crunches the numbers to show optimal building shapes for any given set of priorities (maximizing sunlight, say, or views, or privacy) and pushes limits to the extreme, where they can be seen, debated and, often, thoroughly undone. It creates a datascape that is the basis of the design. In 1994, for instance, MVRDV was asked to build housing for the elderly — an apartment block with 100 units — in an already densely developed suburb of Amsterdam. Because of height regulations and the need to provide adequate sunlight for residents, only 87 of the called-for units could fit within the site’s restricted footprint. Rather than expand horizontally and consume more of the neighborhood’s green space, MVRDV borrowed a page from its “vertical suburbia” and hung the remaining 13 apartments off the side. Their wonderfully odd WoZoCos housing complex takes the conventional vertical housing block and reorganizes it midair with these bulging extensions that seem to be levitating right up off the ground. Four years later, when MVRDV was selected to build economically mixed housing in Amsterdam’s docklands area, the firm held countless negotiations with the parties involved — local politicians, the planning authority, possible future residents — all of whom advocated for a different distribution of the housing. Eventually MVRDV threw all the data into a computer and came up with the Silodam — 157 apartments of various sizes and prices that sit together in one 10-story multicolored block that rises on stilts from the harbor like a docked container ship. From the outside, the Silodam looks simple enough — as literal as a child’s giant Lego construction — but inside the block is filled with a vast array of dwellings arranged into economically mixed “mini-neighborhoods,” while a series of communal galleries and gangways allow residents to walk from one end of the “ship” to the other. MVRDV’s radical, research-driven methodology has been a source of fascination to critics and competitors from the start. “No one else has found as convincing a way,” writes the historian Lootsma, of “showing the spatial consequences of the desires of the individual parties involved in a design process, confronting them with each other and opening a debate with society, instead of just fighting for one or the other, as most architects would.” And the urbanist and designer Stan Allen, now dean of the Princeton School of Architecture, points out that “rather than impose structure, leading to closure and more precise definition, MVRDV works to keep the schema open as long as possible, so that it can absorb as much information as possible.” In fact, MVRDV’s architects rely so much on gathering and metabolizing data, information and competing points of view that they insist they leave no formal signature on their work. “We try to avoid any sort of aesthetic aspect in our designs,” van Rijs told me. “Unlike Gehry, Zaha and others whose work is easy to recognize, we don’t have a strong personal style. Our methodology is based more on logic. Sometimes we call it an iron logic: depending on the situation, we come and take a look and say: ‘What’s happening? What should be done?’ Then we follow a step-by-step narrative, and when you see the building, you get the final result. It’s the only possible outcome. You cannot see anything else.” But if MVRDV’s design process is really so rational and objective — if, as Stan Allen says, the architects reject “fuzzy intuition” and “artistic expression” for a step-by-step pragmatism in which “form is explained only in relation to the information it encodes: architecture as a series of switches, circuits or relays activating assemblages of matter and information” — then why, Allen asks, are their creations so unexpected and witty, sometimes even so spectacular? Commissioned to build large-scale housing in a sprawling Madrid neighborhood already choked with monotonous low-rise construction, MVRDV designed a typical horizontal housing block with an interior courtyard. Then the architects flipped the block on its side to create Mirador, a towering 22-story icon for the neighborhood with the courtyard now transformed into an enormous, open-air balcony offering sweeping views of the Guadarrama Mountains. Some MVRDV designs are so logical they seem to turn reality on its head. In 2007, two years after Hurricane Katrina devastated much of New Orleans, the actor and architectural enthusiast Brad Pitt asked 14 design firms to help his nonprofit Make It Right rebuild the city’s impoverished Lower Ninth Ward, one of the neighborhoods hardest hit by the storm. Specifically, he asked for designs for an affordable — but also floodproof — 1,200-square-foot house with three bedrooms and a porch. Maas, van Rijs and de Vries — citizens of a country that is continually defending its buildings from the threat of inundation — had already contributed to an exhibit of post-Katrina architecture: inspired by a child’s crayon drawing of New Orleans residents walking to safety up an imaginary hill, they conceived a new elementary school made safe from rising waters by tucking it inside an artificial, grass-covered mound, where balconies hung off the sides and a playground covered the top. Now, having received Brad Pitt’s call, they came up with an ingenious, almost whimsical solution to the problem of future flooding: their “Bend House” was a variation on the South’s traditional low-slung shotgun houses, this one hinged in the middle so that its front and back are raised above the waterline. Some critics were appalled. By creating a dwelling that already looked flood-damaged, perhaps even uninhabitable, MVRDV appeared to be using the New Orleans disaster to score political points or, worse, to be winking ironically at the residents’ ongoing plight. Others thought the Bend House was emblematic of MVRDV’s best work and of the architects’ knack for creating buildings whose formal inventiveness arises from the explicit display of the social or environmental problems that brought them to life: VPRO’s endless interiors signaling the need for social connection; WoZoCos’s hanging boxes showing how to preserve our green spaces; the festively striped Silodam offering ways to mix rich and poor. “The architecture that we make is part of the ordinary, part of our pop culture,” Maas told me. “At the same time, the buildings try to engage with society by questioning our behavior and offering alternatives. And they offer those alternatives by showing — visibly, obviously — in their actual design the social problems we were trying to address. When you see the object, you see the question.” Maas’s remark brought to mind an appraisal of MVRDV’s work by the French architect Alain Guiheux. “A great mystery in architectural projects surrounds the definition of what is acceptable to the client,” he writes. Where does the client’s caution and censorship begin? At what point does that caution become the architect’s own self-censorship? Guiheux goes on to say that MVRDV tries to resist society’s censorship — and overcome its own — by using playfulness to “soften up conformity” and by “pushing back the line between the reasonable and the incredible.” That, he says, is their “magic,” and has effected a break with architectural convention “like that undergone by painting at the beginning of the 20th century, pre- or post-Duchamp.” In the case of MVRDV’s New Orleans Bend House, the playful break with convention was not accomplished without considerable debate. “When you have a federal government that doesn’t invest in its levees, that makes people’s land completely worthless, that makes its own citizens insanely poor, you need a design that makes a protest, that rises up and says, What is going on here?” Maas said. “But in discussions with Brad and the others, we kept asking: Yes, but can we show that explicitly? Can we come out with that? It’s going to look ironic! How can you be ironic in the face of disaster? Will the American people be angry? “But even in the most tragic circumstances,” Maas went on, “there is often a moment of irony. Well, is it irony? Or is it really more like . . . ?” He paused, at an uncharacteristic loss for words. “There is this beautiful German word, Trost. It means empathy, or solace, or maybe consolation. I think that is what our building meant to express. You know, if the waters are going to come, let them come. Let’s do it. Let’s just turn and face it.” Darcy Frey is a contributing writer for the magazine. His last article was about bears who were overtaking a Canadian town. Home * World * U.S. * N.Y. / Region * Business * Technology * Science * Health * Sports * Opinion * Arts * Style * Travel * Jobs * Real Estate * Automobiles * Back to Top Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company
  17. Lords of Trafalgar okay $7-million condo facelift MIKE BOONE, The Gazette Published: 7 hours ago A 93-per-cent approval rating is difficult to achieve on this side of the Great Wall. But that's the vote Norman Glouberman got to approve repairs at the Trafalgar condominiums. Fixing the walls and roof of the 70-year-old building on Côte des Neiges Rd. above Cedar Ave. is going to take three years and cost an estimated $7 million. Glouberman, who chairs the eight-member Trafalgar board of administrators, got the okay from residents in 53 of the building's 57 units. Four dissidents are suing to contest the project, but the overwhelming majority has carried the day and work began in May. "The first information session did not go well - $4 million to $5 million for the masonry was a big shock for everyone," says Norman Glouberman, head of Trafalgar's board of administrators.View Larger Image View Larger Image "The first information session did not go well - $4 million to $5 million for the masonry was a big shock for everyone," says Norman Glouberman, head of Trafalgar's board of administrators. There's scaffolding up the Côte des Neiges side of the three-tower complex. Pallets of bricks and mortar are stacked amid luxury sedans in the courtyard. After leaving the keys to my unluxurious car with the Trafalgar doorman yesterday, I rode the vintage elevator, with its sliding brass grate door, up to Glouberman's fourth-floor condo. He and his wife have a seven-room, 2,200-square-foot unit, and Glouberman's share of the repair bill will be $170,000. Even at this elevated socio-economic stratum, that's not chump change. And no one turned handsprings - probably ill-advised at their age, anyway; two of the condo owners are 90-somethings - when residents were told the Trafalgar needed a facelift. "Unlike apartments, in a condo arrangement everyone has a say," Glouberman said. "Normally, people don't say anything. But when there's money involved ..." The Trafalgar was built - by the grandfather of Montreal restoration architect Julia Gersovitz - as apartment units in 1933 for $1 million. That was serious money in the Dirty Thirties. "The sad part," Glouberman said, "is I've been told that during the 1970s, which was really tough times for real estate, the building was sold for $1 million." That was then. The Trafalgar is evaluated at $55 million. A 3,300-square-foot condo recently sold for $1.4 million. Glouberman has lived there nine years. There's been minimal turnover - about 20 per cent in that time. Who would move? It's a honey of a location on the slope of Mount Royal, with dazzling views of downtown. Glouberman, who's an architect, walks to his Ste. Catherine St. office. Even great buildings start to crumble. The Trafalgar underwent masonry repairs in 1995, but a three-year renovation project was stopped after one year because residents didn't want to spend money on repairs that were not deemed necessary. That was a mistake. "We knew there were minor problems with the masonry," Glouberman said, "but not major problems." Three years ago, the condo board commissioned a thorough study of what ought to be done. The leaky roof could be repaired for $1.5 million and the garage could be fixed for $750,000. "But $4 million to $5 million for the masonry was a big shock for everyone," Glouberman said. "The first information session did not go well." No one - not even a rich downtown condo owner - likes a $150,000 repair bill. But almost every property owner realizes home repair is a good investment - especially in a high-class building like the Trafalgar. Not that it's perfect. The elevator remembers only the floor number pressed by the first passenger to board. Rosemary's Baby vibe notwithstanding, that's the charm of the Trafalgar: a 93-year-old resident drives her car, and the elevator has Alzheimer's. [email protected]
  18. Le Patriote LE PATRIOTE - NOUVEAU PROJET À HO-MA! MAINTENANT EN PRÉ-VENTE! Description : À partir de 125 000$ 5990 rue Hochelaga 3½, 4½, 5½ Finition de qualité (choix de couleurs) Planchers de bois Air climatisé Rangement intérieur Stationnement intérieur & extérieur Subvention disponible Information sur le projet Type: Condominium Prix: $125,000.00 Nbre de pièces: 3½ à 5½ Adresse: Le Patriote 5990 Hochelaga Hochelaga/Maisonneuve, Montreal Québec, Canada H1N 1X4 Contact John Cianci Téléphone : 514-324-2828 Site du promoteur: Ulisse Construction Site Web du projet: Le Patriote
  19. Bon bon, moi aussi je suis fatigué d'en entendre parlé même si c'est totalement mérité. Mais voici un article intéressant sur lequel je suis tombé aujourd'hui. Jackson considered moving to Montreal, according to new tell-all book Source: InMusic MONTREAL - A new book about pop icon Michael Jackson's final years says the singer once considered moving to Montreal because polls indicated Quebecers rejected child abuse allegations made against him. "Unmasked: The Final Years of Michael Jackson," says the megastar behind such hits as "Thriller" and "Bad" spurned the United States after surveys indicated many Americans still thought him guilty even though he was acquitted of child abuse charges in 2005. Author Ian Halperin, who oddly enough predicted in December 2008 that Jackson would be dead in six months, writes that Jackson's first choices for a new home were Britain and Berlin, followed by Montreal. Jackson died June 25. The cause of death has not yet been determined. "Quebec had always held a special affection for Jackson and it happened to be the only jurisdiction in North America where polls showed that the majority of residents firmly rejected the child abuse allegations against him," Halperin writes in the book, released Tuesday in English and French by Montreal's Transit Publishing. Halperin cites unidentified associates of people who dealt with Jackson as well as "one of the city's leading realtors" for his information on the possible Montreal move. The realtor told him and a group of people at a June 2007 cocktail party at the Montreal Grand Prix that she was in the process of selling Jackson a house and that he had already been to Montreal twice to look at potential properties. "He came incognito," Halperin quotes the realtor as saying. "He even attended a hockey game while he was here." Although Jackson was shown places in the upscale Westmount and Outremont districts, he didn't see anything that suited his needs. Privacy was paramount to him, the realtor said. Jackson did like a "swanky mansion once owned by the Bronfman family," although it wasn't for sale. Halperin also explored other Quebec connections, including negotiations between Jackson's Neverland Entertainment Group and a Montreal film company to start a new film production division. Despite announcements a deal had been struck, it eventually fell apart because of Jackson's financial problems, Halperin writes. He also recounts a conversation he had with now-deceased Montreal broadcaster Ted Blackman, who told him of a chat between the singer and a francophone journalist Blackman overheard in the mid-1980s. "They were discussing whether or not Quebec would be better off being separate from Canada," Halperin quotes Blackman as saying of the backstage encounter at a Jackson show in Montreal. "Jackson replied, 'Oui, oui.' I was amazed. Jackson said he thought Quebec could be another Paris and that Canada was too culturally lame to sustain Quebec." Blackman reportedly said Jackson ignored anglophone journalists and spoke to French-language media in broken French, accepting a fleur-de-lis key chain from one reporter. Halperin's book was literally on the printing presses when news of the pop star's sudden death was announced. It was pulled so a brief update could be included. Halperin says in his conclusion to the book that while he started his investigation believing that Jackson was guilty of child abuse, he couldn't find any evidence to support the allegation. While he criticizes sensationalist media, he also says Jackson also bears blame for his own misfortune because of behaviour that "bordered on criminal stupidity." The author, who says he got his information from friends and associates of Jackson, paints a disheartening picture of the pop star's declining years. He says ill health likely would have prevented Jackson from completing a comeback tour that was scheduled to start recently.
  20. 19 condominiums exclusifs dans l'ancienne bâtisse du Ouimetoscope au coin des rues Montcalm et Sainte-Catherine dans l'arrondissement Ville-Marie (Le Village). Streetview http://maps.google.ca/maps?q=montcalm+et+sainte-catherine&hl=en&ll=45.51835,-73.556283&spn=0,0.001725&sll=45.518349,-73.556282&sspn=0.006295,0.006295&layer=c&cbp=13,107.68,,0,-16.98&cbll=45.51842,-73.55622&z=19&panoid=zxNkf-BfvlGIZeA-izuHkQ LES PLANS DÉTAILLÉS ET TOUTE AUTRE INFORMATION SUR LE PROJET SERONT BIENTÔT DÉVOILÉS ICI. http://www.ouimetoscope.ca/prelancement/
  21. Newbie

    RCMP Info

    This is embarrassing. I know it's wrong, but I hope someone can help me, and you are the best informed people I know in Montreal. I left an university library book to be photocopied at Copie 2000 on Sherbrooke Ouest at Peel. Apparently some author made some kind of copyright claim and the RCMP took all of Copie 2000's books for an investigation. Now they (Copie 2000) say they do not have my book and are still waiting for them to be returned by the police. Also they do not want to give me any information about the case at all and seem quite upset and a little bit rude. I wonder if there is any website where I can learn of the suit or if the RCMP would be willing to inform me about it in some way so I can estimate a return date. Is this information public?
  22. http://blogs.moneycentral.msn.com/topstocks/archive/2009/08/17/almost-90-of-us-bills-have-cocaine-traces.aspx Posted Aug 17 2009, 06:04 AM by Douglas McIntyre Cocaine traces on dollar bills Filed in the folder marked “facts most people would never imagine” is the news that nearly nine out of 10 bills in the U.S. are contaminated with cocaine. Data released by the American Chemical Society says that “cocaine is present in up to 90 percent of paper money in the United States, particularly in large cities such as Baltimore, Boston, and Detroit. The scientists found traces of cocaine in 95 percent of the banknotes analyzed from Washington, D.C., alone.” Many of those bills were used at some point to actually take cocaine, but many were contaminated by being bundled with tainted bills. The problem is growing rapidly. Two years ago, the number was 67%. The information raises the opportunity for law enforcement agencies to use the traces of the substance to track the international movement of drugs. Most large transactions for products like cocaine and heroin are done in cash. The flow of illicit drugs has been nearly impossible to trace. That may have changed in just the last year or so.
  23. Quebec lags in IT spending Slowest growth. Ontario has highest investment per worker ERIC BEAUCHESNE, Canwest News Service Published: 8 hours ago Ontario and Alberta lead the other provinces in investment in information and communications technology per worker, which is increasingly seen as a key to boosting Canada's lagging productivity performance. In contrast, New Brunswick and British Columbia have invested the least in productivity-enhancing computers and telecommunications equipment and software, and Quebec's growth in such spending is the lowest among the provinces. Those are the findings of a report by the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released this week in the wake of news that Canada has suffered its longest slide in productivity in nearly 20 years, leaving output per hour worked here further behind that in the U.S., its main trading partner and competitor. The report noted that other studies have found that Canadian investment in information and communications technology, like Canadian productivity growth, lags that of the U.S. The focus of the Ottawa-based think tank's latest study, however, is on the varying levels of such investment within Canada. This year has been the first published breakdown by Statistics Canada of such investment by province. "Many factors affect productivity but ICT investment is a key one," economist Andrew Sharpe, the report's author and head of the research firm said in an interview. For example, the lower level of productivity in most of Atlantic Canada compared with Ontario has been linked to lower levels of ICT investment in Atlantic Canada, he said. Important ICT investment disparities exist, only some of which can be explained by the industrial makeup of the provinces, it said. All provinces have experienced strong growth in ICT investment this decade, led by Newfoundland with increases of nearly 15 per cent per year, almost double that in Quebec which had the weakest growth in such investment at 8.4 per cent. However, the actual level of investment per worker in 2007 varied widely. "These disparities ... may stem from many reasons: Lower levels of wealth, a lack of investment-friendly policies, policies favouring investment in other asset types or industrial structure. "Yet, the significant differences in ICT investment between provinces suggests that policy differences may be important in driving ICT investment," the report concluded. Provincial Breakdown Information and communications technology spending per worker: Ontario $3,870 Alberta $3,722 Canada $3,353 Saskatchewan $3,050 Quebec $2,953 Prince Edward Island $2,935 Newfoundland $2,765 Nova Scotia $2,716 Manitoba $2,688 British Columbia $2,674 New Brunswick $2,445 Centre for the Study of Living Standards
  24. L'éditeur de bottins achète pour 178 M$ US les actifs d'une entreprise spécialisée dans les activités d'édition d'annuaires. Pour en lire plus...