Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Administrator

Expos gone, baseball alive in Montreal

Aspiring baseball players and history keep sport going

By Stephen Ellsesser / Special to MLB.com

 

 

 

MONTRÉAL -- On a Sunday morning, the corridor between Pie IX Station and Olympic Stadium is almost completely deserted.

Based on some of the crowds that came out to the Big O in 2004, the final season for Major League Baseball in Quebec, it almost seems the Expos never left.

 

After touring Olympic Stadium, it's almost as if they were never there.

Montréal, the world's most truly bilingual city, is known for its tolerance, but Stade Olympique may have walked away from the Expo-dus with hard feelings.

 

Baseball in Canada's Sin City existed long before the Expos became the Washington Nationals, and today it lives on in many different forms, some nearby and some farther away, but hardly any of it at Olympic.

 

A catcher, a piece of meat and a glorified Muppet form an interesting picture of the ville's offerings to the sport.

 

Catcher Russell Martin is bringing back Dodger Blue to Montréal, giving the city another Major Leaguer to support, along with Eric Gagne, who won a National League Cy Young Award with the Dodgers, but now comes out of the bullpen for the Red Sox.

 

Both played for the same high school, and both are among the greatest offerings to come from Baseball Quebec's feeder system, which remains strong, according to Gilles Taillon, the group's administrative director.

"The actual departure of the Expos had no impact whatsoever," Taillon said. "The major impact was in 1995-97, when the Expos got rid of a championship team. We experienced a decrease in our membership mainly due to the bad publicity that baseball was getting in the media."

 

In 1994, the strike-suspended season clipped an Expos club that was cruising along, on pace to win 105 games. The ensuing firesale disenchanted the fan base.

 

The team parted with Marquis Grissom, Larry Walker, Delino DeShields and John Wetteland after the year, and the foundation began to crumble.

By the time the Expos rolled into their final season, Montréal had lost all momentum, not to mention a considerable amount of local interest. After the Expos' fate was sealed, there was no last-minute spike of support. For the opener of the final series at the Big O, a crowd of 3,923 watched the home team fall to the Florida Marlins.

 

The worst part? That was only the fifth-smallest turnout of the year. Yikes. "You really can't blame them with some of the decisions that were made," said former third baseman Tim Wallach of the fans who stayed away. "When fans follow guys and they have no chance of staying when it's time for them to get paid, that turns people off."

 

 

The Expos succumbed to a combination of economic factors, all of which, Wallach said, slowly took hold after original owner Charles Bronfman sold the team in 1991.

 

"I feel bad because there were a lot of people who loved that team," said Wallach, who played for the Expos from 1980-92. "It was good, and it should have been good for a long time. But it went bad, and now it will never be there again."

 

Martin remembers fondly the Expos and their days north of the border.

"It was different for me because I loved baseball," he said. "I could care less how big the stadium was or how many fans were there, as long as I was at the stadium. I grew up going to that stadium and watching the Expos, so that was a big thing."

 

Montréal, with a metro-area population of 3.6 million, is large enough to support an MLB club, but what the area baseball community is most focused on is starting smaller.

 

"For MLB to come back, it would have to go through the Minor League route first," Taillon said. "At this point in time, efforts are being made to bring a Can-Am League team in."

 

The Can-Am League is an independent league composed of eight U.S.-

based teams, one road team and one Canadian club, based in provincial capital Québec City.

 

"It would be nice to see baseball back up there, but they would have to give it a better venue, a smaller stadium and more fan-friendly activities," Martin said.

 

As for the piece of meat, sometimes life is stranger than fiction.

On eBay, someone (Cirque du Soleil's founder, interestingly enough) paid $2,605 Canadian for what was billed as "The Last Hot Dog of the Expos," which was -- as one might expect -- a hot dog, which was almost a month old at the time of sale.

 

All of a sudden the $2,100 sale price of Montreal-Expos.com looks like a bargain.

 

"It was different there because there wasn't that many fans that loved baseball," Martin said. "But those that did love baseball, they were always at the stadium."

 

Indeed. Nothing says loving quite like a thousand-dollar piece of processed meat. But the apocalypse is not upon us yet ... proceeds went to charity.

Ignoring any discussions of shelf life, the Expo with the most staying power has been mascot Youppi!, who joined the rotation at Bell Centre, home of the Canadiens, Montréal's hallowed NHL franchise.

 

Youppi! hit the ice just more than a year after his team's departure put him out of work. His presence, along with that of a banner honoring the Expos' 1969-2004 existence and the team's retired numbers, makes Nos Amours more visible there than at the Big O. The luxury condos that stand where Labatt Park -- the proposed downtown stadium that would have helped the franchise stay put -- would have been built are only a couple blocks away from Bell Centre, so it almost makes sense for it to feel closer to home.

 

Where the sport thrives, however, is in Baseball Québec's tight infrastructure.

 

The organization emphasizes getting kids involved early through two main programs, Rally Cap and Winterball, which is sponsored by MLB.

 

In Rally Cap, players ages 4-7 are taught skills and techniques, being evaluated as they meet different performance targets. With each level advanced, they get a new hat of a different color.

 

"Winterball," Taillon said, "is designed to provide gym teachers with plans to initiate students in grades 3, 4 and 5 to baseball."

 

Prospective players are evaluated for Baseball Québec's high-performance leagues between ages 14 and 15. From there, it is Midget AAA and the Ailes du Québec program, the province's U17 team.

 

Those who continue play in the ABC program in the fall and winter and the Elite League in the summer. Players at this level are at the top of their game, and many are either drafted or signed to play college baseball in the United States.

 

Martin and Gagné are veterans of the ABC program.

One player hoping to follow in their footsteps is James Lavinskas, a 20-year-old third baseman for the Montréal Elites, one of the only shows in town for baseball fans.

 

A three-sport star in football, baseball and hockey at a Connecticut prep school, Lavinskas came up through the Elite League's feeder programs, and now he is heading to the United States for college ball.

 

Lavinskas will play for Seminole State College in Oklahoma, following once again in Gagné's footsteps.

 

"Guys are getting drafted every year," Lavinskas said, summing up his hopes after moving on from the Elite League.

 

With Baseball Québec's work, the sport's foundation in Montréal is stabilizing, with or without Olympic Stadium's help.

 

Aside from a single postcard and one or two minutes of a 30-minute tour, baseball's only other fingerprint on the facility stands right out front, a statue of Jackie Robinson.

 

After signing Robinson, Branch Rickey sent him to Triple-A Montréal. On the road, Robinson was jeered just as he would be when he was promoted, but in Montréal, fans loved their star second baseman.

 

Robinson batted .349 with the Triple-A Royals that season, leading the team to a 100-win season. During Robinson's final game with the team, fans gave him a standing ovation, and a second curtain call, amazing support for a black athlete in 1946.

 

"The fans just chased him after the game because they loved him and didn't want him to go," Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame president and CEO Tom Valcke said. "Rachel Robinson once said, 'That must have been one of the first times a white mob was chasing a black man for a good reason.' Don't tell me Montréal has bad baseball fans. They've always been great."

Even if baseball did not live on at Olympic Stadium, at least baseball left a marker of tolerance in its place, and that is worth more than a hall of jerseys and signed balls. Stephen Ellsesser is a contributor to MLB.com. Associate reporter Jayson Addcox contributed to this report. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A ballpark that never was

 

MONTREAL -- Labatt Park has had two deaths -- not bad for something that never actually existed.

 

Condos now stand where the downtown park would have been built, and after the project was canned, the model of the park was passed to the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

 

On one truly unlucky night in the Hall's archives, the model also met its destruction.

 

"They just destroyed it, the two very troubled young men," said president and CEO Tom Valcke, recalling a day he said literally brought tears to his eyes. "It could have been a stagecoach or an old ping-pong table, but they wanted to destroy whatever got in their way that night."

 

The 12-by-12 model, too large to be a regular fixture at the St. Marys, Ontario, museum, was in storage. Although a smaller Labatt Park model exists, the larger one (valued at $80,000 Canadian) was a sight to behold.

"It was something -- one of the showstoppers in our collection," said Tom Valcke, director and CEO of the Hall. "I've never seen anything else like it, nothing before and nothing since. The detail -- individual seats, trees, all the concession stands -- it was beautiful."

 

The model made an initial showing at the Hall, then Valcke put it away until a proper space could be created for it.

 

Less than a month after the Expos franchise began its new life at RFK Stadium, two teenagers broke into the building where the model was kept and destroyed it, adding a bizarre and somewhat ironic twist to the life of the park that never was and never would be.

 

Valcke said the Hall kept the pieces and that it could be reassembled, but that the task would be daunting and that it would be difficult to recapture the piece's original majesty. "We kept every single splinter of it," he said. -- Stephen Ellsesser

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By mtlurb
      REM de l'est
      Je propose de créer un nouveau fil pour ce projet sorti de nulle part cet après-midi.
      http://journalmetro.com/actualites/montreal/1655839/quebec-allonge-15m-pour-etudier-de-grands-projets-de-transport-collectif/
      "de même que l’extension du Réseau express métropolitain (REM) dans l’emprise du train de l’Est."
    • By ChrisDVD
      Réseau express métropolitain (REM) phase 1

      26 stations / 67 km
      Liens utiles :
      http://www.rem.info/ http://www.nouvlr.com/ https://surlesrails.ca/ https://www.devisubox.com/dv/dv.php5?pgl=Project/interface&dv_pjv_sPjvName=Reseau Express Metropolitain https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRulWJrtFo8KNxr-2FgILhQ https://twitter.com/REMgrandmtl https://www.instagram.com/rem_metro/ https://www.facebook.com/REMgrandmtl/
      TRAINS
      Voiture de type métro léger, électrique Flotte de 212 voitures Alstom Metropolis Rame de 4 voitures en heure de pointe; rame de 2 voitures en hors pointe Capacité de 150 passagers par voiture (assis et debout) Configuration entre deux voitures de type "boa" Alimentation électrique par caténaire Systèmes et conduite automatisée des trains Vitesse maximale de 100 km/h STATIONS / GARES
      Quais d'environ 80 m de long Portes palières sur les quais Accessibles à pied, vélo, par autobus et en voiture Accès universel Ascenseurs, escaliers mécaniques et supports à vélo Wi-Fi offert sur toute la ligne Préposés circulant dans les rames et stations pour information et contrôle ---
      Fil de discussion pour les prolongements hypothétiques:
      https://mtlurb.com/index.php?/topic/15107-rem-expansion-future/
       
       
       
    • By mtlurb
      Rue Saint-Denis : une longue terrasse pour minimiser l'impact des travaux
       
      Mise à jour le mercredi 10 juin 2015 à 20 h 10 HAE
       
      La Ville de Montréal aménagera une terrasse sur la rue Saint-Denis entre les rues Duluth et Marie-Anne afin de maintenir la vie commerciale de la zone touchée par des travaux de réfection majeurs.
       
      La « Grande Terrasse Rouge » sera déployée dès cet été, mais les travaux ne commenceront qu'en septembre 2015 et devraient se terminer en novembre 2016.
       
      D'autres installations « décoratives » et « festives » seront aménagées, notamment en utilisant les fameux cônes orange. Des banderoles seront aussi suspendues dans les airs pour mettre en valeur les commerces de cette rue.
       
      Les espaces de stationnement seront par ailleurs relocalisés et le chantier sera nettoyé quotidiennement. Des passerelles permettront aussi aux piétons de se déplacer entre les commerces et restaurants.
       
      Les travaux permettront de changer le mobilier d'éclairage, de changer les conduites d'aqueduc et d'égout et de reconstruire les trottoirs.
      Le coût total de ces travaux est évalué à 14,4 millions de dollars, dont 4 millions pour les mesures de mitigation.
       
      Cette initiative fait partie du nouveau programme d'aide financière pour réduire les nuisances sur les artères commerciales lors de chantiers de construction dans la métropole.
       
      « Dans le passé, on a entendu qu'il n'y avait pas d'effort de la part de la Ville de Montréal pour aider les commerçants », a expliqué le responsable des Infrastructures de la Ville de Montréal, Lionel Perez.
       
      Il souligne que la plus grande partie des travaux aura lieu en 2016, et qu'en 2015 « ce sera tolérable ».
       
      Des commerçants mitigés
       
      Certains commerçants accueillent positivement ces travaux et croient que les mesures de mitigation seront efficaces. Ce n'est toutefois pas le cas de tous.
       
      « Oui la période des travaux sera difficile, oui ça va être le bordel quelque part sur la rue, ce sera des travaux majeurs, mais avec les mesures de mitigation et dès 2017, ça va être l'occasion de faire renaître cette rue majeure de Montréal », a affirmé le directeur du marketing des ventes des Guides de voyage Ulysse, Olivier Gougeon.
       
      « Je ne sais pas si ça peut permettre de sécuriser le périmètre de chantier, ce n'est pas si pire. Mais je ne pense vraiment pas que ça sera attractif pour les gens. Je pense qu'ils vont encore plus magasiner ailleurs », a répondu Julie Peneau, une vendeuse de la boutique Paris pas cher.
       
      M. Perez affirme de son côté que les commerçants ont été consultés à plus de neuf reprises concernant les travaux et leurs revendications. Selon lui, ils sont « très contents » de voir que la Ville de Montréal s'investit pour attirer des piétons, des clients, mais ils demandent à être rassurés en ce qui concerne le stationnement.
       

       
       

      Vue aérienne de la rue Saint-Denis, où on peut voir la « Grande Terrasse Rouge » qui sera aménagée cet été. Photo : Ville de Montréal
    • By Nameless_1
      La Ville de Montréal dévoile sa programmation hivernale
      26 novembre 2020 | mise à jour le: 26 novembre 2020 à 17:14 temps de lecture: 5 minutesPar:  Zacharie GoudreaultMétro

      De nouvelles places publiques, des sentiers mieux entretenus dans les parcs, des patinoires: la Ville de Montréal a présenté jeudi sa programmation hivernale. Elle espère ainsi inciter les Montréalais à «bouger en sécurité» au cours des prochains mois, tout en stimulant l’achat local.
      La pandémie, combinée aux journées plus courtes et grises qui marquent l’arrivée de l’hiver, ont affecté le moral des citoyens, constate la mairesse de Montréal, Valérie Plante.
      «Il y a cette fatigue qui s’installe et qui est plus difficile pour certaines personnes. C’est un climat qui est assez anxiogène», a-t-elle souligné jeudi après-midi lors d’une conférence de presse à l’hôtel de ville. Elle a alors présenté la programmation hivernale 2020-2021 de la Ville de Montréal.
      ...
      Des stations hivernales
      Ce plan prévoit notamment l’aménagement de 25 stations hivernales dans 17 arrondissements de la métropole au cours des prochaines semaines. Celles-ci prendront forme près d’artères commerciales, voire sur celles-ci, afin d’inciter les Montréalais à aller faire leurs emplettes dans les commerces locaux. Ces petites places publiques seront lumineuses afin d’attirer le regard.
      ...
      Pas pour se réchauffer
      Afin d’éviter que ces petites places publiques deviennent des lieux de rassemblements, aucune programmation d’activités culturelles ou ludiques ne sera mise en place pour ces lieux. Par ailleurs, les stations hivernales ne seront pas chauffées.
      ...
      Plus d’activités dans les grands parcs
      Le programme prévoit par ailleurs la création de nouvelles patinoires, dont une au square Cabot et une seconde au parc Jean-Drapeau. Ce dernier accueillera également une glissade, de même que de nouveaux kilomètres de sentiers pédestres et d’autres dédiés aux fat bike et au ski de fond, entre autres.
      Par ailleurs, bien que la Fête des neiges n’aura pas lieu cette année au parc Jean-Drapeau, plusieurs activités gratuites y seront offertes à partir du 19 décembre, assure la Ville. Cette programmation proposera notamment la découverte d’un sentier historique en raquettes et une exposition extérieure baptisée «Océans».
      ...
      Contrôler l’achalandage
      La Ville entend d’ailleurs s’assurer de surveiller les grands parcs cet hiver pour en limiter l’achalandage. Cet été, l’administration municipale a notamment dû fermer le stationnement du parc du Mont-Royal à plusieurs reprises parce que trop de personnes s’y sont rendues les jours de beau temps.
      «Il y a le mont Royal, mais il y a d’autres endroits. C’est ce que je veux dire aux Montréalais.» -Valérie Plante, mairesse de Montréal
      https://journalmetro.com/actualites/montreal/2583376/la-ville-de-montreal-devoile-sa-programmation-hivernale/
       
×
×
  • Create New...
adblock_message_value
adblock_accept_btn_value