Jump to content

Many retailers have closed their sites to Quebec traffic due to language restrictions


IluvMTL
 Share

Recommended Posts

Here are some examples that show US based companies that have retail stores in Québec, but don't rush (if at all) to translate their online sites, probably because of the relatively small population base in Quebec vis à vis North America. In the meantime we are cut off from ordering online.

 

http://montrealgazette.com/business/local-business/retail/blocked-in-quebec-u-s-stores-shut-down-english-only-web-sites-when-they-open-here

 

Blocked in Quebec: U.S. stores shut down English-only web sites when they open here

 

EVA FRIEDE, MONTREAL GAZETTE

More from Eva Friede, Montreal Gazette

Published on: November 12, 2014Last Updated: November 12, 2014 5:20 PM EST

 

Many retailers have closed their sites to Quebec traffic due to language restrictions.

 

As the invasion of U.S. retailers continues and as the Internet increasingly becomes the marketplace and the research centre of consumers, some Quebecers are getting unpleasant surprises: some companies have blocked access to their websites here either because they have voluntarily complied with the French Language Charter or because they have received a notice from the Office québécois de la langue française.

 

The latest sites to shut down are Williams-Sonoma, West Elm, Pottery Barn and Pottery Barn Kids, all part of the same San Francisco-based company and all arrived in Quebec within the last two years. The sites shut down on Oct. 22, according to a company spokesperson.

 

But a quick survey shows many prominent U.S. retailers with brick-and-mortar stores in Quebec continue to operate English-only shopping sites here.

 

The probable reason: the Office québécois de la langue française, charged with ensuring that Quebec’s French Language Charter is respected, sends notices to retailers only if complaints are filed, said spokesman Jean-Pierre Le Blanc.

 

The Williams-Sonoma spokesperson confirmed in an email that the brands have ceased e-commerce activities in Quebec for an undetermined period in order to comply with Quebec language regulations. The home pages and other information pages are available in English only, but clicking on the shopping link takes you to a redirect loop.

 

“We are actively working with the stores in order to find ways to continue to make the shopping experience memorable for our Quebec customers,” the spokesperson wrote.

 

BCBG, Club Monaco and Urban Outfitters are among other retail brands that block access to shopping or to their entire sites in Quebec.

 

Urban Outfitters and Anthropologie, part of the same Philadelphia-based company, blocked access to their websites when they opened stores here. Anthropologie, which opened in Montreal in late 2012, launched its French website 13 months later. Urban Outfitters remains blocked. But Free People, also part of the chain, does not have a store here and the site is accessible, either for research or Internet sales.

 

Similarly, Club Monaco shut its site in Quebec when it launched an online shopping site. A visit to its home page invites customers to visit its store, which is soon to expand and move to a prominent location at Ste-Catherine St. W. at Metcalfe, from Les Cours Mont-Royal. Founded by Canadian Joe Mimran in Toronto in 1985, Club Monaco is now owned by Ralph Lauren and headquartered in New York.

 

sent via Tapatalk

Edited by IluvMTL
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It must have to do with translation and customer service costs relative to their client base. Some of these guys are pretty big. Do they not have online services in other non-English speaking countries?

 

sent via Tapatalk

Edited by IluvMTL
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It must have to do with translation and customer service costs relative to their client base. Some of these guys are pretty big. Do they not have online services in other non-English speaking countries?

 

sent via Tapatalk

 

They probably do, but usually the products offered in the US/CANADA are similar, while the products that they offer in other regions are totally different.

So basically, they would need to invest a lot of money translating their offering for the Quebec market with what they perceive as little return.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Les règlements d'affichage pour des sites de ventes en ligne sur l'internet s'appliquent seulement à des entreprises qui ont des pignons sur rue au Québec? Les items sur les sites 'off shore' ne sont pas assujettis à la loi 101?....

 

Les quebecois qui voyagent hors province profitent pour magasiner des items pas disponible ici, ou a meilleur prix a cause de la compétition. Alors on protège qui contre quoi exactement?

 

sent via Tapatalk

Edited by IluvMTL
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It does suck, but sooner or later the store will have to either:

 

1. Have a French option; so it appeases the Bill 101 gods

2. Stick to what they have now; so everyone just shuts up and drives to the store or goes somewhere else to buy what they are looking for

3a. Close all stores in Quebec because of the law; so people lose their jobs and loss or revenue

3b. Still sell to Quebec from Ontario and let Ontario get all the revenue, while Quebec gets the shaft; loss of revenue and higher unemployment.

Edited by jesseps
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Donc, je peux magasiner et acheter en toute légalité sur un site Internet ,en anglais, si la boutique n'est pas physiquement présente au Québec. Pas de problème. Une boutique ouvre à Montréal, le web m'est tout d'un coup censuré. Je perds un service que j'utilisais déjà, et qui ne posait pas problème.

 

Ouaip, c'est plein de bon sens. :awesome:

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Donc, je peux magasiner et acheter en toute légalité sur un site Internet ,en anglais, si la boutique n'est pas physiquement présente au Québec. Pas de problème. Une boutique ouvre à Montréal, le web m'est tout d'un coup censuré. Je perds un service que j'utilisais déjà, et qui ne posait pas problème.

 

Ouaip, c'est plein de bon sens. :awesome:

 

C'est ce que je me disais. Je veux bien croire que c'est important de protéger notre langue, mais je trouve que ce qu'ils font avec les sites web de compagnie étranger un peu exagéré!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dans une entrevue avec Paul Arcand, un relationniste de l'OQLF mentionnait que la grande majorité des chaînes étrangères entrent en contact avec l'OQLF pour s'informer des lois à respecter et faire approuver leurs documents avant l'annonce officielle d'implantation au Québec.

 

Si la majorité le font, j'ose croire que celles qui ne le font pas ne se sont simplement pas bien informées.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...