Jump to content

Piétonnisation ratée à Boston: Should Downtown Crossing be reopened to traffic?


begratto
 Share

Recommended Posts

Un article, qui, je le sent, fera plaisir à Malek :silly:

 

 

Should Downtown Crossing be reopened to traffic?

 

Would car traffic bring back the crowds?

Boston Globe, by Michael Levenson, Globe Staff | March 1, 2009

 

Downtown Crossing's problems have been well-documented: Crime has spawned fear, heightened by a stabbing and shooting in the midst of a bustling afternoon. Shops that once thrived next to Jordan Marsh and Filene's have shuttered, leaving empty storefronts cheek-by-jowl with pushcarts, discount jewelry stalls, and gaping construction sites. Sidewalks that teem with rowdy teenagers and office workers by day lie empty and forbidding at night.

 

For years, city planners have been promising to restore the area to its former grandeur and make it a major urban destination. But as they have attempted solution after solution without success, they have never tried one idea: reopening the streets to traffic.

 

Indeed, Downtown Crossing remains one of the last vestiges of a largely discredited idea, the Ameri can pedestrian mall, which municipal planners once believed would help cities compete with proliferating suburban malls. In the 1970s, at least 220 cities closed downtown thoroughfares, paved them with bricks or cobbles and waited for them to take hold as urban destinations. Since then, all but about two dozen have reopened the malls to traffic, as planners, developers, and municipal officials came to believe that the lack of cars had an effect opposite of what they had intended, driving away shoppers, stifling businesses, and making streets at night seem barren and forlorn.

 

"Pedestrian malls never delivered the type of foot traffic and vitality they had expected," said Doug Loescher, director of The Main Street Center at The National Trust for Historic Preservation.

 

"The sense of movement that a combination of transit modes provides - whether on foot or in car - really does make a difference," he said. "People feel safer, because there's some kind of movement through the district, other than a lone pedestrian at night. It just creates a sense of energy that makes people feel more comfortable and makes the district more appealing."

 

Boston planners are against opening up Downtown Crossing, but as the district suffers the exodus of anchor businesses and a deepening malaise has settled in, some shop owners long for the energy, ease, and excitement they remember before Downtown Crossing closed to most traffic in 1978.

 

"There was a constant flow of cars, stopping and going; it was very active, very busy, like a typical city street," said Steve Centamore, co-owner since 1965 of Bromfield Camera Co., on Bromfield Street, part of which is open only to commercial traffic. "There were people coming and going. It didn't seem to impede any pedestrians. It was a lot busier. People could just pull up and get what they needed. Now, it takes an act of Congress to even get through here."

 

Pellegrino Bondanza, 72, who has sold vegetables in Downtown Crossing since he was a boy, said the pedestrian mall "didn't work out well." He hopes the city will reopen it to traffic.

 

"Maybe it would bring some of the action back in town," he said. "I remember as a kid, I tried to squeeze in with a pushcart and, if I could locate at a corner, I could sell what I had in an hour and make a good living there. You had to be a little careful crossing the streets and everything, but don't forget the cars went slow when they were going up them streets there. There was no fast driving."

 

Boston officials say they considered reopening Downtown Crossing to traffic and, in 2006, hired a team of consultants from London, Toronto, Berkeley, Calif., and Boston to study the idea. The consultants concluded that the mall should stay because the estimated 230,000 people who walk through Downtown Crossing every day should be enough to keep the place lively and economically vital.

 

"What we heard from them pretty loudly was, 'Not just yet. Make it work. Give it your best effort,' " said Andrew Grace, senior planner and urban designer at the Boston Redevelopment Authority. "Lots of cities throughout the world make these districts work. The historic centers in most European cities function, and they thrive."

 

Kristen Keefe, retail sector manager of the BRA, warned that bringing back traffic could squeeze out pedestrians who, she said, already contend with crowded sidewalks. "We just think these two things are in conflict," she said.

 

Boston built its pedestrian mall after a study showed that six times more pedestrians than cars traveled down Washington Street - in front of what was then Filene's and Jordan Marsh - "so the impetus was to reassert the balance for pedestrians a little bit and improve the safety and amenities for pedestrians," said Jane Howard, who helped design the mall for the BRA and is now a planner in a private firm.

 

It was a time when malls were being built across the country. Some are still considered successful - in Burlington, Vt., and Charlottesville, Va., for example. And New York City is experimenting with blocking traffic on Broadway through Times and Herald squares to create pedestrian-only zones. But those are the exceptions.

 

Chicago, which turned downtown State Street into a pedestrian mall in 1979, reopened it to traffic in 1996, convinced that the mall had worsened the area's economic slump and left the street deserted and dangerous. Eugene, Ore., scrapped its mall in 1997, frustrated that "people went around downtown instead of through it," said Mayor Kitty Piercy. Tampa got rid of its mall in 2001 because it "didn't bring back any retail," as the city had hoped, said Christine M. Burdick president of Tampa Downtown Partnership.

 

Buffalo, which has trolley service on its mall on Main Street, is currently reintroducing cars after finding that shoppers avoided stores that were cut off from traffic.

 

"It takes a leap of faith to go somewhere nearby, pay to park, and then walk to someplace you haven't been yet," said Deborah Chernoff, Buffalo's planning director. "All the cities are dealing with the reality of how people actually behave."

 

Downtown Crossing is not even a full pedestrian mall. Because Washington Street, its main thoroughfare, is open to commercial traffic, pedestrians mostly stick to the sidewalks, avoiding the cabs and police cruisers that often ply the route.

 

After dark on a recent weeknight, just after 8:30 p.m., Downtown Crossing resembled a film noir scene, its deserted rain-slick streets glistening with the reflections of neon signs from a shuttered liquor store and a discount jewelry shop. The few pedestrians who hurried by were mostly teenagers and office workers descending into the subway or headed to the bustle on Tremont Street. They walked purposefully, scurrying past darkened store after darkened store with metal gates pulled shut. The only cars were a police cruiser that rumbled past, an idling garbage truck, and the occassional taxi.

 

Yet some say the mall should stay.

 

The developer Ronald M. Druker, who owns buildings on Washington Street, said he has "vivid memories of the conflict between cars and pedestrians," before the mall was built. "If you insinuated cars and trucks on a normal basis into that area, it would not enliven it," he said. "It would create the same problems that it created 30 years ago when we got rid of them."

 

But others, particularly the shop owners struggling to survive the recession say they are eager to try just about anything that would bring back business.

 

"Downtown Crossing definitely needs something - that's for sure," said Harry Gigian owner since 1970 of Harry Gigian Co. jewelers on Washington Street, which has seen a sharp dropoff in sales. "Nobody comes downtown anymore."

 

 

 

De mon côté, j'adore les rues piétonnières européennes. Par contre, dans la plupart des cas, plusieurs des éléments qui font leur succès là bas ne sont pas réunis de ce côté ci de l'Altantique:

 

- Bien qu'animées à certains moments de la journée ou de l'année, nos rues principales sont plutôt tranquilles la majorité du temps (les matins, les journées froides d'hiver, etc)

- la présence d'itinérants, plus nombreux ici

- il n'y a pas de "point focal", de destinations, ou point d'attraction majeure à chaque bout de nos rues qui ont le potentiel de devenir piétonnières.

 

Par contre, il est très agréable de se promener dans la foule, l'été, sur une rue sans traffic automobile.

 

Un compromis: avoir des rues piétonnières temporaires? par exemple, fermer Ste-Catherine les vendredis, samedis et dimanches de l'été, de midi à minuit?

 

Bon, on ouvre les lignes! Les amateurs d'urbanisme, bonjour!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:goodvibes: Les rues piétonnières sont définitivement un gros plus pour une ville, cela dit chaque ville a sa personnalité et des besoins qui varient considérablement d'un endroit à l'autre. Quand je regarde le succès indéniable des villes européennes, petites et grandes je constate qu'une importante population locale habite déjà le secteur et y a ses habitudes de consommation bien ancrées.

 

Il faut au départ une certaine densité de résidents et des services de proximité accessibles à faible distance: boulangerie, épicerie, petits commerces, cafés, restos et terrasses. Peuvent ensuite s'ajouter des commerces plus pointus: vêtements, cadeaux, accessoires etc. L'idée et l'erreur commune n'est pas de remplacer les centres commerciaux qui génèrent de gros achats parfois encombrants mais de développer le maximum de services conviviaux qui répondent davantage aux besoins quotidiens.

 

Voilà ce qui existe à peu près partout en Europe et qui répond davantage à une population à l'esprit européen du genre de Montréal notamment. En d'autres mots, c'est la population qui fait toute la différence entre le succès et l'échec de cette formule. Idéalement les rues piétonnières sont habitées aux étages supérieures des bâtiments ce qui assurent déjà un minimum d'animation par le simple mouvement des résidents. Ensuite les rues avoisinantes doivent elles aussi être résidentielles et avoir un minimum de densité pour nourrir l'activité commerciale.

 

Finalement il faut un bon service de transport en commun qui dessert le secteur en complétant l'apport de clients. Le reste se fait alors tout seul car l'ambiance se créé avec l'usage. Ste-Catherine est un succès parce qu'elle répond parfaitement aux critères de base et est en plus accessible par métro et autobus, un gros avantage qui amène des gens venant souvent de loin, de même que son lot de touristes (de banlieues ou d'ailleurs) qui profitent de l'atmosphère agréable en se mêlant à la population locale.

 

Prince-Arthur est aussi un bon exemple qui perdure déjà depuis plus de trois décennies, Duluth, St-Paul (dans le vieux) et Mont-Royal sur certains périmètres gagneraient aussi en popularité si on réduisait la circulation automobile tout en ajoutant soit un tramway ou autre moyen de transport convivial.

 

Québec utilise la formule depuis plusieurs décennies et partout où les rues ont été transformées on a constaté un augmentation appréciable de l'achalandage. Cependant si on regarde l'exemple d'Ottawa et la rue Spark qui ne répond pas aux critères de base, c'est plutôt un quasi échec parce qu'elle s'adresse persqu'exclusivement aux touristes qui ne sont présents que quelques mois par année. Et les rues sont désertes la nuit puisque c'est un secteur à forte concentration de bureaux.

 

Maintenant quand on regarde du côté des E.U. la plupart des villes sont bâties avec des centre-villes d'affaires sans résidents permanents et des quartiers limitrophes souvent mal déservies en transport en commun et avec un taux de criminalité plutôt élevé. La population en général est aussi plus dépendante de sa voiture et marche peu en ville, toujours à cause de ce sentiment d'insécurité répandu un peu partout dans le pays. Les commerces de proximité sont aussi plus rares car les habitudes de consommation sont plutôt du genre hebdomadaires que quotidiennes.

 

Il est donc difficile dans ces conditions de créer les éléments favorables à ce type de vie urbaine pourtant si agréable. Et c'est bien dommage parce que c'est la qualité de vie de l'ensemble de la population qui en souffre. La ville n'est pas seulement un lieu de résidences mais aussi et surtout un milieu de vie où on se divertit, où on profite des espaces et des services dans un sentiment de liberté et de confort maximum.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote name=acpnc;54268Il faut au départ une certaine densité de résidents et des services de proximité accessibles à faible distance: boulangerie' date=' épicerie, petits commerces, cafés, restos et terrasses. Peuvent ensuite s'ajouter des commerces plus pointus: vêtements, cadeaux, accessoires etc. L'idée et l'erreur commune n'est pas de remplacer les centres commerciaux qui génèrent de gros achats parfois encombrants mais de développer le maximum de services conviviaux qui répondent davantage aux besoins quotidiens.

 

Maintenant quand on regarde du côté des E.U. la plupart des villes sont bâties avec des centre-villes d'affaires sans résidents permanents et des quartiers limitrophes souvent mal déservies en transport en commun et avec un taux de criminalité plutôt élevé. La population en général est aussi plus dépendante de sa voiture et marche peu en ville, toujours à cause de ce sentiment d'insécurité répandu un peu partout dans le pays. Les commerces de proximité sont aussi plus rares car les habitudes de consommation sont plutôt du genre hebdomadaires que quotidiennes.

 

[/quote]

 

 

Je suis d'accord avec toi. L'élément clé dans la réussite d'un quartier ou d'une rue\place piétonnière est effectivement la densité de population qui y vit matin, jour, soir et nuit avec les commerces qui conviennent aux résidents du quartier.

 

Si on construit en espérant que les gens viennent alors c'est un ''guess'' et il faudra toujours faire avec ce que la compétition fera ailleurs tandis qu'avec une bonne densité de population dans le quartier meme, avant meme de penser aux touristes ou aux banlieusards, cela apporte déjà une quantité non négligeable de gens qui fréquenteront l'endroit car c'est leurs lieux de vies.

 

Des exemples européens il y en a en masse et Paris, bien sur, en premier lieu.

 

Aux États-Unis, à part quelques places comme Times Square (Qui n'est meme pas pour oiétons mais quand meme) à New York et Millenium Park à Chicago et peut-etre Union square à SF il n'y a pas beaucoup d'endroit fréquenté 24 heures ou presque s'il n'y a pas de population locale.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...
adblock_message_value
adblock_accept_btn_value