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Found 29 results

  1. http://9to5google.com/2011/09/22/google-becomes-a-virtual-mobile-network-operator-in-spain-rest-of-europe-coming-soon/ It be interesting to see them come here and become an MVNO with one of the carriers here and maybe even start up their own ISP.
  2. Les employés des hôtels Quality Street, à Pointe-Claire, et Holliday Inn, à Longueuil, se sont mis en grève ce matin. Pour en lire plus...
  3. Which Are The World's Cleanest Cities? Robert Malone, 04.16.07, 12:10 PM ET In Pictures: The World's Cleanest Cities There is clean and then there is clean. In the world, as a rule of thumb, the North is clean and the South is dirty. Indeed only two of the top-25 cleanest cities in the world are below the Equator--Auckland, New Zealand, and Wellington, New Zealand. The cleanest cities are largely located in countries noted for their democracy and their industrialization. The only Asian cities represented are in Japan. There are no top-25 clean cities in South or Central America, Africa and Australia. The U.S. has five of the top 25; Canada, a strong five, with the top spot its city of Calgary; Europe has 11 of the top 25; and Japan has three. The 25 cleanest cities are located in 13 countries. It may not be accidental that these countries are among the highest in purchasing power parity according to the World Development Indicator database of the World Bank. Twelve are in the top 20, and only New Zealand lags in wealth, at No. 37 on the list of world's wealthiest. So clean may also mean well-off. In Pictures: The World's Cleanest Cities To be clean a city has to face and solve many problems that otherwise lead to unsanitary conditions and poor health as well as possible economic stagnation. Producing energy for industry, homes and transportation has to be planned and executed reasonably, and this means some form of regulation and control. To be clean means organizing what is done with waste. Landfills are being closed or filled up. Recycling is the only long-range answer, but this takes civic discipline, a system and preferably a system that turns a profit. Green only works well when it results in greenbacks. In addition a city has to look closely at its transportation infrastructure (roads, rail, air, subways) and their impact upon being clean or going dirty or staying dirty. The logistics infrastructure is also critical in terms of efficiency that can translate into money and fuel savings that in turn affect cleanliness (air quality, water quality and ground quality). Taken all together as with clean energy generation, waste control, recycling and various levels of infrastructure reorganization, the challenge is formidable. Some will recommend taking on one challenge at a time, and this may be what President Bush has in mind with ethanol. Bush's advocacy of ethanol is a step towards cleaner fuel and in turn cleaner cities. The idea is also controversial as the resources available for ethanol are directly related to the food supply chain. There can be great friction over sharing such resources. Some are advocating inputs beyond corn grain. "One of the most abundant potential resources we have is the nonfood parts of the corn plant, including the stalks, leaves and husks,” says Dr. Michael Pacheco, director of the National Bioenergy Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The figures for the cleanest cities are derived from studies by the Mercer Human Resources Consulting that cull from 300 cities, identifying overall quality of living as well as special reports on regions. It is interesting to note that size does not appear to be a factor either in terms of size of population or physical size of the city. The most common trait in common to each is a focus on high tech, education and headquartering of national and international companies along with an extensive public transit system.
  4. http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/15-wishes-for-montreal-in-2015 15 wishes for Montreal in 2015<article itemscope="" itemtype="http://schema.org/NewsArticle" id="post-430336" class="post-430336 post type-post status-publish format-standard has-post-thumbnail hentry category-local-news tag-education tag-homelessness tag-montreal tag-politics tag-social-issues l-article" style="margin: 0px; padding: 15px 0px 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1;"><header class="entry-header" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"> KATHERINE WILTON, MONTREAL GAZETTE More from Katherine Wilton, Montreal Gazette Published on: <time itemprop="datePublished" class="entry-date published pubdate" datetime="2015-01-03T16:23:47+00:00" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">January 3, 2015</time>Last Updated: <time itemprop="dateModified" class="updated" datetime="2015-01-03T16:23:49+00:00" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">January 3, 2015 4:23 PM EST</time> </header><figure class="align-none wp-caption post-img" id="post-439490media-439490" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="http://wpmedia.montrealgazette.com/2014/12/montreal-que-november-25-2014-the-skyline-in-montreal.jpg?w=1000" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Helvetica, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-stretch: normal; line-height: normal; vertical-align: baseline; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); float: none;"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" itemprop="description" style="margin: -1px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> The skyline in Montreal at dusk Tuesday November 25, 2014. John Mahoney / Montreal Gazette</figcaption></figure>SHAREADJUSTCOMMENTPRINT As Montrealers rang in the New Year this time last year, a gloomy cloud hung over our city. In the midst of an unforgiving winter, our social peace was being threatened by a divisive debate over the Parti Québécois’s proposed charter of secular values, which would have restricted public employees from wearing or displaying conspicuous religious symbols. With a spring election on the horizon, the fear of another referendum hung like a dead weight from many of our shoulders. Poor job prospects and political uncertainty persuaded some of our fellow citizens to leave for greener pastures in Ontario and Western Canada. No matter where we turned, it was hard to escape the bad news. The Charbonneau Commission continued to uncover tales of corruption, our road network remained in abysmal shape and commuters fretted about the safety of the Champlain Bridge. But one year later, the mood seems lighter. “Montreal is back,” insisted Denis Coderre, the city’s populist mayor who has been trying to set a new tone. Coderre is already at work planning the city’s 375th birthday celebrations in 2017. He says the festivities and related development projects will have lasting benefits for residents, such as a pedestrian link from the mountain to the river. But many wonder whether Coderre has a vision and long-term plan for a city that is still facing employment and demographic challenges. So what’s in store for Montreal in 2015? The city will get several new hospitals when the McGill University Health Centre opens this spring, and the city’s skyline is filled with cranes — but surely more needs to done to enhance our quality of life. We asked 15 Montrealers who are well-connected to their city for their suggestions on how to make the city a more enjoyable place to live in 2015. Here are their ideas, in their own words. Raphaël Fischler, director of McGill University’s School of Urban Planning <figure id="attachment_439425" class="wp-caption post-img aligncenter" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Helvetica, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-stretch: normal; line-height: normal; vertical-align: baseline; text-align: center; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 2em; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-stretch: normal; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Raphael Fischler is director of the School of Urban Planning at McGill University. Courtesy of McGill University. Picasa</figcaption></figure>The new year must see progress in ongoing efforts: reducing the high-school dropout rate, helping the homeless find permanent housing, repairing old infrastructure, greening the city. It must also see two goals reach the top of the political agenda: making public spaces, facilities and buildings universally accessible; and anticipating the transformation of older suburbs. Montreal is a difficult place for people with limited mobility, be they children in prams, adults in wheelchairs or elderly people using walkers. The winter is an ordeal for them, but even the summer is difficult because of inadequate infrastructure in streets and buildings and in the transit system. Universal accessibility must become a priority. As central neighbourhoods continue to gentrify, low-income households, including immigrants, are moving away from the centre, in particular to suburbs built in the 1950s to 1970s. The residents of such suburbs will need better access to public transit and services than is currently the case there. It is imperative that we start planning to meet the challenge of suburban poverty. Yves Laroche, owner Yves Laroche Galerie d’Art <figure id="attachment_439485" class="wp-caption post-img aligncenter" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Helvetica, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-stretch: normal; line-height: normal; vertical-align: baseline; text-align: center; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 2em; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-stretch: normal; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Yves Laroche in his art gallery on St. Laurent Blvd. in Montreal. Vincenzo D'Alto / Montreal Gazette</figcaption></figure>I wish that Montreal could get its good mood, its collective happiness, back. I hope the people who are negotiating the public-sector contracts for the city of Montreal and the unions all put a little water in their wine and come to some agreement. This city has been in such a grumpy frame of mind lately. You can see it in the faces of the policemen and the firemen and the city workers. Visitors to the city tell me that they feel it, too. It is weighing on all of us. But what I wish for most of all is for the young, emerging artists who make this city what it is be left alone to create their own personal imprints without being boxed in by teachers or dealers or art-buyers who tell them what will sell, what’s in vogue, what colours are best. I wish we would begin to see outsider art from the worlds of tattooing and graffiti and comics with fresh new eyes. Matthew Pearce, chief executive officer of the Old Brewery Mission <figure id="attachment_439429" class="wp-caption post-img aligncenter" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Helvetica, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-stretch: normal; line-height: normal; vertical-align: baseline; text-align: center; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 2em; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-stretch: normal; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Matthew Pearce, CEO of the Old Brewery Mission. Marie-France Coallier / Montreal Gazette</figcaption></figure>In 2015, I want Montrealers to join the Old Brewery Mission in imagining a city where every citizen has a place to call home and no large numbers of people are resorting to shelters and soup kitchens for their survival — month after month, year after year. Further, I want us all to resolve to own the social phenomenon of homelessness and each contribute in our own way to significantly reduce the amount of men and women who find themselves on the street. The city and the province have recently issued their respective action plans on homelessness and so, for 2015, I want to see … action. Specifically, solutions to homelessness exist when we act collectively to create diverse affordable housing options with the appropriate counselling supports, adapted health care services and preventive measures to ensure people remain housed. See the end of homelessness as we know it today. It will work. Coralie Deny is the director general of the Conseil régional de l’environnement de Montréal <figure id="attachment_439431" class="wp-caption post-img aligncenter" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Helvetica, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-stretch: normal; line-height: normal; vertical-align: baseline; text-align: center; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 2em; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-stretch: normal; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Coralie Deny, director general of the Conseil régional de l’environnement de Montréal, behind a staircase that was built from wood recovered from Georgian Bay in Lake Huron. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette</figcaption></figure>In 2015, there will be a lot of talk about planning and development in the Montreal region. We hope that it will be done with sustainable development in mind and that the changes will improve the quality of life. Some of the important issues will be the adoption of Montreal Island land-use development plan, urban plans for each city on the island, a parking policy, an updated transportation plan and the plan for repaving Ste-Catherine St. W. These plans will provide us with guidelines on how Montreal will be shaped. The plans must be precise and visionary and take into account principles that will be followed in all parts of the island. There must be improvements in public transport service and more bike paths. We need to promote Montreal as a walkable city, develop our streams and improve access to the river. We should also establish a network of connected green spaces, revitalize neighbourhoods and spruce up their commercial streets. If we work together, 2015 can be a pivotal year for Montreal. Heather O’Neill, author <figure id="attachment_439439" class="wp-caption post-img aligncenter" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Helvetica, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-stretch: normal; line-height: normal; vertical-align: baseline; text-align: center; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 2em; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-stretch: normal; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Author Heather O’Neill lives in Montreal and writes about the city. She is photographed with her dog Muppet at home on April 25, 2014, at her desk where she spends most of her time writing. Marie-France Coallier / Montreal Gazette</figcaption></figure>There’s an unhealthy fixation on young people in our society now. We try to micromanage every minute of their day and spend absurd resources on them. And I think they should be just left in peace to lie around in the libraries and daydream and doodle strange sea creatures in the margins of their notebooks and to engage in philosophical discussions with their pet mice. On the other hand, I think that we as a city should take better care of our elderly citizens. Transportation is really difficult for many of them. There are so many elderly who are abandoned and alone and neglected, prisoners in their own homes. There is no place for them in society and they are treated as though they are burdens. I just think they need to be valued and respected more. We’ve become a little callous in our attitudes toward the elderly. Everyone needs to accept that this is a part of life and one of our basic obligations. Better aid needs to be given to home care for seniors and those family members, often only one person, who have to shoulder all the responsibility of taking care of them. Eric Dupuis, chef-owner Dominion Square Tavern and Balsam Inn <figure id="attachment_439441" class="wp-caption post-img aligncenter" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Helvetica, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-stretch: normal; line-height: normal; vertical-align: baseline; text-align: center; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 2em; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-stretch: normal; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Eric Dupuis, chef and co-owner of the Balsam Inn poses for a photograph at the newly opened restaurant in Montreal, Wednesday, December 17, 2014. Graham Hughes / Montreal Gazette</figcaption></figure>We should exploit our European side more, with its lifestyle and traditions. That way we would make our city more vivante and exciting for residents and tourists. Let’s create more vibrant neighbourhoods by letting them develop their own personalities instead of passing so many laws and rules meant to over-protect our society. And as individuals we should stop being insular and share more time with our neighbours. Montreal should have terraces everywhere, even in winter. We should have more small markets where producers come to sell their goods. These are both ways of encouraging outdoor living in winter. We should let parents bring their kids into bars (not night clubs) when they go out for a drink with their friends. We should have l’apéro every evening of the week, not just on Thursdays. Bring back that old European spirit we had back in the day! Kim Arrey, nutritionist <figure id="attachment_439442" class="wp-caption post-img aligncenter" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Helvetica, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-stretch: normal; line-height: normal; vertical-align: baseline; text-align: center; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 2em; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-stretch: normal; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Kim Arrey, a dietician/nutritionist prepares a yogurt and apple snack in her home in Montreal, Wednesday December 17, 2014. Vincenzo D'Alto / Montreal Gazette</figcaption></figure>This will be the year that we show the world that Montreal really is different from other cities in North America and that we take very seriously the challenge of providing nutritious, healthy, delicious food to all our citizens at an affordable price. We will start with our hospitals and long-term-care institutions, ensuring that the meals served to patients will play a key role in establishing better health. Budgets will be adjusted so that food is considered medicine, and an integral part of the care plan of each patient. Rooftop gardens at the superhospitals will provide the kitchens with fresh, nutritious, tasty produce. Grocery stores on site will help our patients purchase affordable, nutritious food, as prescribed by our dietitians and doctors. Insurance companies will reimburse clients for the visits that they make to the dietitian, and the government will give us a tax credit for purchasing health-promoting food. The goal would be not just to prevent nutrition deficiencies but to promote good health through good nutrition. Yves Desjardins-Siciliano, president and CEO of VIA Rail Canada <figure id="attachment_439453" class="wp-caption post-img aligncenter" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Helvetica, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-stretch: normal; line-height: normal; vertical-align: baseline; text-align: center; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 2em; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-stretch: normal; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> President and CEO of Via Rail, Yves Desjardins-Siciliano in the Montreal offices, on Thursday, December 18, 2014. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette</figcaption></figure>My wish for 2015 is to see more Montrealers travelling by train to Québec City, Ottawa or Toronto, and any points in between or beyond. Every time Montrealers choose the comfort and safety of the train, where they can put their time to good use — they are helping to reduce their environmental footprint, reinforce the importance of their national public transportation service and support the growth of Canada’s economy in the 21st century. Montrealers, like all Canadians whether they live in large metropolitan areas or in smaller communities in between, have in VIA Rail a reliable rail system that allows them to get wherever they need to be without the use of their cars. At VIA Rail, we believe that inter-modality is everyone’s business and, in cooperation with our public transportation partners, we offer an alternative that helps unclog our highways and makes getting in and out of our cities easier and more enjoyable. Robert Green, a history teacher at Westmount High School <figure id="attachment_439450" class="wp-caption post-img aligncenter" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Helvetica, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-stretch: normal; line-height: normal; vertical-align: baseline; text-align: center; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 2em; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-stretch: normal; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Westmount High School history teacher Robert Green. John Mahoney / Montreal Gazette</figcaption></figure>In 2015, I would like to see an end to politicians attempting to accomplish their goals at the expense of vulnerable public-school students. Last year, it was teachers and students from various religious minorities being stigmatized by the Parti-Québécois government’s proposed charter of values; this year, it’s (Quebec Premier Philippe) Couillard attempting to balance the budget by asking vulnerable students to pay for all the tax cuts the previous Liberal government had doled out to the rich. Montreal’s public schools have a high numbers of students with special needs and students from low-income families. These are inevitably the students most affected when budgets for education and other social services are cut. When Mr. Couillard was running for election, he stated that he saw education as an investment in Quebec’s future. It would be nice if in 2015 he showed this was more than empty rhetoric by doing two things: 1) reversing the cuts to public education; 2) dealing fairly with the province’s teachers in upcoming contract negotiations. Craig Sauvé, Projet Montréal city councillor for Saint-Henri — Petite-Bourgogne — Pointe-Saint-Charles district <figure id="attachment_439457" class="wp-caption post-img aligncenter" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Helvetica, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-stretch: normal; line-height: normal; vertical-align: baseline; text-align: center; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 2em; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-stretch: normal; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Craig Sauvé, Projet Montreal city councillor, at city hall. John Mahoney / Montreal Gazette</figcaption></figure>For 2015, I hope that improving the quality of life for citizens is truly a high priority for all levels of government. I hope that Quebec seriously re-thinks its transportation strategy: the government should reconsider its plans for the $600-million Highway 19 project and instead reinvest the money in important public transit projects such as the LRT (light-rail train) on the Champlain Bridge, a West Island mobility plan and the extension of the métro’s Blue Line. At the city level, I hope that Mayor (Denis) Coderre shows some leadership on transport. In 2014, the STM has had to cut bus departures because of budget cuts; they are now in catch-up mode. Our neighbourhoods need more bus and métro service, not less. We also need more investment in bike paths to promote healthy, active transport. Affordability and economic fairness are on the minds of all Montrealers, our governments need to implant measures that will make it easier for families to make ends meet: keep housing affordable, stop hiking STM fares and hydro rates, protect affordable, quality daycare and education. I also hope that all levels of government invest in greener neighbourhoods, green energy initiatives and protecting our valuable green spaces, such as Meadowbrook Park. I hope that 2015 is a year of peace, joy, understanding and working together. John Archer, wealth adviser for RBC Dominion Securities <figure id="attachment_439465" class="wp-caption post-img aligncenter" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Helvetica, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-stretch: normal; line-height: normal; vertical-align: baseline; text-align: center; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 2em; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-stretch: normal; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Financial adviser John Archer in Montreal. Allen McInnis / Montreal Gazette</figcaption></figure>From a financial adviser’s point of view, the state of an individual city does not really impact financial markets or investment portfolios (unless, of course, you own Montreal’s municipal bonds in your investment portfolio or within your mutual fund or pension plan). However, the city does affect the adviser’s quality of life and that of his or her family. From a quality of life point of view, I have three items on my Montreal wish list: Firstly, I would like to see a drastic improvement of our homelessness issue. Just once I would like to walk freely from Atwater Ave. to Peel St. without being accosted for money every block or so. Secondly, I would like to see an improvement in programs and employment opportunities to help our youth thrive economically in the city. If our children cannot see a future here, and they continue to abandon us, then that will be our greatest loss. Thirdly, I would like to see a coordination of road construction along with our traffic flow and control. There is nothing more frustrating than driving on one of our many streets under construction than waiting for an intolerably long light and seeing that there is absolutely no work nor reason for the closed lane to be blocked off with orange construction cones. Surely our traffic flow can be better managed under these situations. Maria Liliana Madriz, co-owner of Cachitos, a Venezuelan restaurant on Ste. Catherine St. <figure id="attachment_439471" class="wp-caption post-img aligncenter" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Helvetica, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-stretch: normal; line-height: normal; vertical-align: baseline; text-align: center; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 2em; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-stretch: normal; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> María Liliana Madriz in Montreal on Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette</figcaption></figure>I wish for the sharks not to bite so much. When you start a small business with all your savings (and countless working hours), you expect a fair amount of permits, taxes, and expenses to bite at your hard-earned income. My wish concerns the hidden taxes that keep biting at you every day: like the 30 free parking spaces that were removed in my area, only to become viciously hounded metered spots, leading clients to pay $52 for the few extra minutes they take to say goodbye. Or the added 25 cents per litre we’re charged for gas in Quebec, affecting our shopping, commute and errands. Or the hikes in rent due to raised school and property taxes. Or the felony of having an English sign that, God forbid, is close in size to the French one, even though the most profitable season is summer, which brings English speaking tourists. To name a few. And then, at the end of the day, while drinking a scotch to forget all of the above, you realize that the scotch also cost you more than it ought to, and that there’s nothing you can do about it, except to drink it slowly and hope that the bites won’t bleed you out. Geoff Molson: Owner, president and CEO of the Club de hockey Canadien, Bell Centre and Evenko <figure id="attachment_439476" class="wp-caption post-img aligncenter" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Helvetica, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-stretch: normal; line-height: normal; vertical-align: baseline; text-align: center; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 2em; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-stretch: normal; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Montreal Canadiens owner Geoff Molson speaks at the funeral for former Montreal Canadiens captain Jean Beliveau at Mary Queen of the World Cathedral in Montreal, Wednesday, Dec.10, 2014. Paul Chiasson / THE CANADIAN PRESS</figcaption></figure>I think this city thrives when the Montreal Canadiens go a long way in the playoffs. I hope we can bring that to the city. And I hope that businesses start to thrive in Montreal and this becomes a destination for businesses to invest in. I can feel it coming. There’s a new wave of optimism in the city. It’s refreshing because it wasn’t always that way in the past decade or so. Just look around the city and see all the (construction) cranes. That’s one reason to be optimistic. But also look at the world economy. Compared to what’s happened in the rest of the world, Montreal and Canada survived quite well in difficult times since 2008. From where I sit, I need to equip Marc (Canadiens general manager Marc Bergevin) with a winning organization for the fans to enjoy. From a business perspective, to do my part, I just need to keep investing in our city and bringing new festivals, a winning hockey team and more business, like the condominiums around our (Bell Centre) building. I hope others do that, as well. Debbie Friedman, trauma director for the Montreal Children’s Hospital <figure id="attachment_439478" class="wp-caption post-img aligncenter" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Helvetica, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-stretch: normal; line-height: normal; vertical-align: baseline; text-align: center; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 2em; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-stretch: normal; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Debbie Friedman is trauma director of the Montreal Children’s Hospital and assistant professor of pediatrics at the McGill school of medicine. </figcaption></figure>I consider it a true privilege to work in the field of health care. Collaborating with many committed individuals who have dedicated their lives to helping others is rewarding and meaningful. Diminished budgets, cuts in salaries, corruption scandals and new laws often detract from what health care should be about namely: the patients and their families. Working in the field of trauma you are reminded all too often about how precious life is and how essential it is to be able to offer timely, expert care. This year, a new chapter begins in the history of the Montreal Children’s Hospital, and the McGill University Health Centre at the Glen site. As trauma director, I am committed to seeing our Pediatric and Adolescent Trauma Centre flourish in its new home. I am confident that despite the challenges we face in health care today, the people I work alongside will be focused on what we do best: providing the highest level of specialized care to our patients and their families. As well as training a new generation of health care professionals, conducting research, and working closely with the public, the media and governing bodies to develop and implement effective injury prevention strategies. As for Montreal, I would hope that a city that has so much potential would get back to the business of thriving and embrace its unique heritage, thereby encouraging our youth to build their lives here in Montreal. Life is precious and those of us working in the area of trauma see the tragic reality of injuries all too often. Danny Maciocia, head coach of the Université de Montréal Carabins football team <figure id="attachment_439494" class="wp-caption post-img aligncenter" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Helvetica, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-stretch: normal; line-height: normal; vertical-align: baseline; text-align: center; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 2em; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-stretch: normal; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Universite de Montréal head football coach Danny Maciocia. Pierre Obendrauf / Montreal Gazette</figcaption></figure>People giving back … as far as professional athletes or even university football players (and others from) athletics. Just trying to give back to the community … getting involved, trying to make an impact, trying to make a difference, trying to influence people’s lives on a positive note. Because at the end of the day, I’m sure they look at several of these individuals as role models. So, just give back, make an impact and, like I said, try to make a difference and bring some core values in their message in 2015. </article>
  5. 10 MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN NEW PROJECT FEATURING OVER 200 TOWNHOUSE 3 BEDROOMS + BASEMENT, GARAGE, PRIVATE BACK YARD DELIVERY Summer 2010 STEPS FROM MONTREAL-WEST TRAIN BUSSE, SCHOOLS, SERVICES CHOICE OF COLORS, STYLES & OPTIONS NO CONDO FEES BASE PRICE: $ 339,900 (incl all taxes) http://www.lescourspominville.ca The reason why I chose to highlight this project is because of its location and that it lends itself to a much greater discussion. Firstly, it is an example of yet another quality project in an area that is known for being low-income and aesthetically sub-par. Secondly, this project is located in the section of Ville Saint Pierre that is very much ‘Montreal West Adjacent’. In fact if it wasn’t for municipal borders it would make a lot more sense for this area of Ville Saint Pierre in particular to be part of Montreal West as opposed to Lachine. That being said, Montreal West has actually closed off vehicular access to the area from Chemin Broughton making a neighbourhood that should be a theoretical extension of Montreal West into a neighbourhood closed off from it. It is now only accessible from Chemin Avon the street that leads into the rest of Ville Saint Pierre (west of the train tracks).
  6. BOCOM SEA TURTLE INDEX The Bank of Communications Sea Turtle Index provides a unique tool to compare university cities at once as education and investment locations, looking at: - Educational returns: Quality and reputation of education vs value for money - Real estate returns: Openness, potential returns and risk with regard to real estate investments - Financial returns: Openness, growth prospects and risk with regard to financial investments - Work experience: Work and pay prospects for overseas graduates - Social experience: Quality of the social and cultural experience on offer OVERALL WORLD RANKING: 1. MONTRÉAL 2. LONDON 3. HONG KONG 4. TORONTO 5. CAMBRIDGE 6. OXFORD 7. BOSTON 8. SYDNEY 9. ZURICH 10 NEW YORK Source
  7. http://www.montrealmirror.com/wp/2010/09/16/news/tacofying-city-hall/ YESSSSSSSS PLEEEEEEEEAAAAAASE!
  8. Broccolini wins two tenders for LEED Gold office towers from the federal government Canada NewsWire MONTREAL, May 7 MONTREAL, May 7 /CNW Telbec/ - Broccolini, a recognized leader in the Canadian construction industry for over sixty years, has recently won two major tenders from the federal government to construct two LEED® Gold office towers, with work slated to begin in late summer. The firm has been awarded the contract to design, develop and build these towers totalling more than 900,000 rentable sq. ft. of Class A office space for the Department of Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) in Gatineau, Quebec. Having successfully developed TELUS House, a 9-storey, Class A, 160,000 sq. ft. LEED® Silver certified office building in Ottawa, and with Export Development Canada's (EDC) 575,000 sq. ft. headquarters under construction, the new mandates confirm Broccolini's significant position in development and construction in the National Capital area. The new buildings will provide space for federal government departments and organizations and will attain LEED® Gold certification. This represents the tenth time that Broccolini will have delivered a LEED® certified project to the marketplace. "We are very proud to have won the mandate for these groundbreaking projects," said Anthony Broccolini, Managing Director at Broccolini. "We believe it reflects our reputation for strong development and construction capabilities, as well as the quality of the work we've previously undertaken in the Ottawa market." The 12-storey, 484,000 sq. ft. office tower, located on Carrière Boulevard in Gatineau, features architecture promoting a healthy balance between efficient planning and the preservation and restoration of natural green space. It will enhance the site's attractions, taking advantage of the extensive mature tree coverage and superb view overlooking Lac Leamy. The building's timeless architecture and cutting-edge technology will be an eye-catching reflection of Broccolini's environmental commitment, as well as its ongoing concern for the quality of its developments. The second building, a 15-storey, 690,000 sq. ft office tower, will overlook Promenade du Portage Street in the heart of downtown Gatineau, adjacent to the PWGSC's existing premises. With architecture combining heritage features and high-tech efficiency, its design will allow the building to optimize the usage of space while restoring and improving a significant element of the city's urban fabric, at the same time incorporating PWGSC's existing facilities. The know-how, experience and passion for development and construction, cornerstones of the company's success, were no doubt major factors in the decision to award the mandate to the firm. With a pristine litigation record and an enviable reputation for integrity, quality of work and flexibility, Broccolini has demonstrated its ability to deliver similar signature properties to the market. "We have major experience in a wide range of projects from office buildings and manufacturing facilities to big box stores and industrial complexes," explained Mr. Broccolini. "Our team is enthusiastic and welcomes the challenges of delivering these exciting and demanding projects on time and on budget."
  9. Residents take airport grievance to auditor-general Want probe into expansion. Supreme Court nixed coalition's request to launch class-action suit against ADM The Gazette Published: 9 hours ago A coalition of Montreal residents has appealed to the auditor-general to investigate Trudeau Airport and what the coalition sees as unchecked expansion that does not consider impact on the environment or the quality of life of thousands of Montrealers. In a petition delivered yesterday to Sheila Fraser, Citizens for Quality of Life asked for an investigation into grievances that date back to 1995, when flights were transferred from Mirabel to Dorval without, the coalition says, public consultation. Night flights, the loss of green space to airport expansion, an increasing number of flight traffic and noise pollution are all cited in the petition. But like other Canadian airport authorities, Aéroports de Montréal is private and therefore outside the auditor-general's purview. Ghislain Desjardins, a spokesperson in the auditor-general's office, said that while the Dorval airport authority cannot be audited, its 60-year lease with Transport Canada can. However, Desjardins noted, any new audit would not happen immediately. Audit reports of federal departments and crown corporations that are already planned take the office into 2010. The coalition alleges Transport Canada failed to appropriately monitor the environmental clauses in its long-term lease with ADM. Copied to more than 40 elected officials, including Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Federal Transport Minister Lawrence Cannon, the petition targets the $1.5 billion in airport expansions that have taken place since 1996. Luc Marion, president of the coalition representing residents in eight Montreal municipalities, including Dorval, St. Laurent, Lachine and Lasalle, said the group was forced to go to the auditor-general after the Supreme Court of Canada refused to grant its request to launch a class-action lawsuit against ADM. "We are questioning the manner in which ADM has been able to move from Mirabel to Dorval, expand as it has without (looking at) the environmental impact now, 20 and 30 years from now," Marion said. There were 543 daily aircraft movements at Dorval airport in 1995, the year before flights were moved back there from Mirabel, Marion said. By 2007, that number had jumped to 666 a day. Marion said if ADM projections of the airport's growth are accurate, the number would reach 716 by 2010 and 864 by 2015. "We are not going to let another 200 planes fly over our heads a day," Marion said. - - - Dorval's airport is getting busier Daily aircraft movements at Dorval's airport 1966 345 1995 543 2007 666 2010* 716 2015* 864 *Projected figures Source: Citizens for quality of life
  10. http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/montreal-working-group-formed-to-improve-citys-business-outlook Montreal has considerable assets when we think of our quality of life, of our spot as the second largest pool of higher-education students in North America and certainly when we think of how safe it is…” Hubert said. There should be a working group that looks at how to retain students. It's all about retention. Students come here from abroad, live for cheap, party hard and then leave. Aside from high taxes, this should be highest priority.
  11. Sorry for the low quality, it was a gray and rainy day.
  12. Located in one of Montreal's most prestigious and central sectors, Le Luxor condominium offers a living standard of high quality and luxury.
  13. Cette camera deviens une serieuse candidate pour etre ma prochaine caméra si Canon ne sorta pas la 5D v2. ------------------------------------------------------ The world’s fastest D-SLR – remastered EOS-1D Mark III: The new benchmark Canon today sets new standards for professional photography with the launch of the EOS-1D Mark III. Delivering 10 frames per second at 10.1 Megapixels for a maximum burst of 110 Large JPEG images (30 in RAW), the EOS-1D Mark III replaces the EOS-1D Mark II N as the world’s fastest digital SLR. Dual “DIGIC III” processors drive the camera’s high speed, high resolution performance, and bring 14-bit image processing to the EOS series for the first time. A ground-up redesign introduces a host of new features and advancements to Canon’s flagship EOS-1 series, including a 3.0” LCD with Live View mode, EOS Integrated Cleaning System, new auto focus system with 19 cross-type sensors, and 63-zone exposure metering. The camera’s APS-H size (28.1 x 18.7 mm) CMOS sensor enables a wider 100-3200 ISO range as standard, expandable to L:50 and H:6400. “The EOS-1D Mark III represents a complete reappraisal of everything Canon has learned over the past 20 years of EOS development,” said Tsunemasa Ohara, Senior General Manager, Camera Development Center, Canon Inc. “In building this camera, we started with a blank canvas. Every facet of the photographic process has been refined, every design decision re-evaluated to bring us to this point: a camera that combines familiar EOS ergonomics with a vastly enhanced specification. Our engineers are overjoyed with the result.” Key features 10.1 Megapixel APS-H CMOS sensor 10 fps continuous shooting for up to 110 frames Dual “DIGIC III” processors New auto focus system with 19 cross type sensors EOS Integrated Cleaning System ISO 3200 (expandable to H:6400) 3.0” LCD with Live View mode Wider, brighter viewfinder Picture Style1 The choice of professionals The EOS-1D line has enjoyed massive popularity among the world’s leading sports, reportage and wildlife photographers, with international wire agencies AFP, Getty and Reuters choosing Canon for their photographers. “The people at Canon are great to work with because they listen to photographers. It’s their attention to detail and the pace of innovation that makes EOS the system of choice,” explained Stephen Munday, Director of Operations – Editorial, Getty Images. Exceptional image quality Canon’s dual “DIGIC III” processors deliver unprecedented levels of speed, responsiveness and image quality. Ready to shoot within 0.2 seconds of power on, the EOS-1D Mark III can capture and process over 100 Megapixels of image data per second, rapidly clearing the image buffer to allow up to 110 frames in one burst. Images are processed at 14 bits for a total colour depth of up to 16,384 tones per pixel, compared to 4,096 tones from 12 bit images. The third generation CMOS sensor incorporates a new pixel design that works together with on-chip noise reduction circuitry to ensure high image quality at ISO 3200. The option to expand to H:6400 will benefit professionals working in news and sports locations where the use of flash is not permitted or desired. Greater precision, more control Canon has redesigned its auto focus system to include 19 cross-type sensors with sensitivity up to f/2.8, spread out across the AF area to better accommodate off-centre subjects. An additional 26 AF assist points are used to aid AF tracking for improved accuracy. Responding to professional photographer requests, a dedicated AF button on the back of the camera allows users to instantly switch auto focus on or off while keeping their eye on the viewfinder. The viewfinder is now brighter and offers a wider angle of view. The camera’s new 63-zone metering system gives photographers greater level of control over exposure. New LCD with Live View The bright 3.0” LCD monitor provides 230K pixels resolution for precise framing and reviewing of shots. New to EOS, Live View mode enables photographers to frame without having to look through the viewfinder – particularly useful for shooting from awkward positions. The menu system on the EOS-1D Mark III has been completely redesigned to take advantage of the LCD size – menus are easier to read and use. A choice of 57 custom functions gives photographers more options for customising camera settings to their daily working requirements. A new My Menu option allows photographers to store frequently used settings on a separate menu for faster access. Settings for new accessories such as the Speedlite 580EX II and Wireless File Transmitter WFT-E2 – also released today – can be controlled directly from the LCD. Total reliability The EOS-1D Mark III incorporates a range of practical enhancements for the working photographer. Shutter durability has been increased by 50% to 300,000 cycles. The body is protected by a magnesium alloy casing with dust and moisture resistant seals. The EOS Integrated Cleaning System provides further reliability by reducing sensor dust, minimising the need for manual cleaning on assignment. To avoid corruption of captured images, a warning appears on the LCD and an alarm sounds if the memory card door is opened while images are still being written. Interfaces include video out (for display in both NTSC and PAL formats) and USB 2.0. Compatibility and accessories Canon is marking today’s launch with the release of several additions to the professional EOS system: EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM – A fast, ultra wide-angle zoom lens delivering exceptional image quality throughout the aperture range. Speedlite 580EX II – An update of the Speedlite 580EX that offers weather resistance when attached to the EOS-1D Mark III. Wireless File Transmitter WFT-E2 – Smaller, lighter and more versatile than its predecessor, the WFT-E2 speeds up workflows by allowing photographers to transmit images wirelessly during the shoot. Original Data Security Kit OSK-E3 – Verifies the authenticity of images taken with the camera and supports image encryption for additional security. Software The EOS-1D Mark III is supplied with a comprehensive software suite to help the photographer’s workflow. This includes Digital Photo Professional (DPP), a powerful RAW converter that provides complete RAW image processing control. DPP integrates with cameras features such as the Dust Delete Data and Picture Style. The camera also comes with EOS Utility, ImageBrowser/Zoom Browser and Photostitch.
  14. (Courtesy of The Gazette) I just wish L'Occitane store wouldn't be in Westmount. I know they have a small kiosk at The Bay. We need more stores/restaurants/hotels in Montreal. - Century 21 (Department Store) - Jamba Juice - Pret a Manger Many more
  15. Quality of Living global city rankings 2009 – Mercer survey United Kingdom London, 28 April 2009 * European cities dominate the top of the ranking * Vienna scores highest for overall quality of living, Baghdad the lowest * Singapore ranks top for city infrastructure; London ranks eighth Vienna has passed Zurich to take the top spot as the world’s city with the best quality of living, according to the Mercer 2009 Quality of Living Survey. Geneva retains its position in third place, while Vancouver and Auckland are now joint fourth in the rankings. Overall, European cities continue to dominate the top locations in this year’s survey. In the UK, London ranks at 38, while Birmingham and Glasgow are jointly at 56. In the US, the highest ranking entry is Honolulu at position 29. Singapore (26) is the top-scoring Asian city followed by Tokyo at 35. Baghdad, ranking 215, remains at the bottom of the table. The rankings are based on a point-scoring index, which sees Vienna score 108.6, and Baghdad 14.4. Cities are ranked against New York as the base city with an index score of 100. Mercer’s Quality of Living ranking covers 215 cities and is conducted to help governments and major companies place employees on international assignments. See top 50 quality of living rankings below. Slagin Parakatil, senior researcher at Mercer, commented: “As a result of the current financial crisis, multinationals are looking to review their international assignment policies with a view to cutting costs.” “Many companies plan to reduce the number of medium to long-term international assignments and localise their expatriate compensation packages where possible though the hardship allowance, based on quality of living criteria, will remain an essential component of the package,” he added. This year’s ranking also identifies the cities with the best infrastructure based on electricity supply, water availability, telephone and mail services, public transport provision, traffic congestion and the range of international flights from local airports. Singapore is at the top of this index (score 109.1) followed by Munich in second place and Copenhagen in third. Japanese cities Tsukuba (4) and Yokohama (5) fill the next two slots, whilst Dusseldorf and Vancouver share sixth place. Baghdad ranks at the bottom of the table with a score of only 19.6. See top 50 infrastructure rankings below Mr Parakatil commented: “Infrastructure has a significant effect on the quality of living experienced by expatriates. Whilst often taken for granted when functioning to a high standard, a city’s infrastructure can generate severe hardship when it is lacking. Companies need to provide adequate allowances to compensate their international workers for these and other hardships.” Americas There have been few changes in the rankings for North American cities. Canadian cities still dominate the top of the index for this region. Vancouver (4) retains the top spot and Honolulu (29) is the city in the United States with the highest quality of living. Washington and New York remain in positions 44 and 49 respectively. In Central and South America, San Juan in Puerto Rico retains the highest ranking at 72, followed by Montevideo at 79. Port au Prince (206) in Haiti continues to rank lowest in the region and has gone down four places in the overall ranking due to food shortages experienced in 2008 and the subsequent riots. Mr Parakatil commented: “A number of South and Central American countries have experienced positive changes. But on the whole, political and security issues, and the incidence of natural disasters, continue to hinder the improvement of quality of living in the region. Shortages of consumer goods have also contributed to a decline in quality of living in some cities.” In terms of city infrastructure, Vancouver (6) again tops the ranking for the whole of the region, with Atlanta following in position 15. Santiago in Chile has the best city infrastructure in Central and South America, whereas Port au Prince is again the lowest ranking at 212. Europe Europe’s cities once more dominate the world’s top 10 for quality of living. Vienna is the city rated with the best quality of living worldwide, moving up one place in the rankings following improvements in Austria’s political and social environment. The rest of the top 10 for Europe are dominated by German and Swiss cities, most of them retaining last year’s ranking and scores. Zurich, in second place, is followed by Geneva (3), Dusseldorf (6), Munich (7), Frankfurt (8) and Bern (9). Many Eastern European cities have seen an increase in quality of living. A number of countries which joined the European Union back in 2004 have experienced consistent improvement with increased stability, rising living standards and greater availability of international consumer goods. Ljubljana in Slovenia, for example, moves up four places to reach 78 while Bratislava moves up three places to 88. Zagreb moves three places to 103. In the city infrastructure index, German cities fair particularly well with Munich (2) the highest ranked in the region, followed by Dusseldorf (6) and Frankfurt in joint eighth place with London. “German city infrastructure is amongst the best in the world, in part due to its first class airport facilities and connections to other international destinations” said Mr Parakatil. London’s ranking in the infrastructure index reflects the high level of public services offered, with its extensive public transport network and wide variety of telecommunication services. Middle East and Africa Dubai (77) in the United Arab Emirates and Port Louis in Mauritius (82) are the region’s cities with the best quality of living. Dubai’s transport facilities have witnessed improvements, with the development of its road infrastructure and expansion of its international airport, and the city is up six places in the ranking. Cape Town in South Africa, previously the city in the region with the best quality of living, has dropped substantially in this year’s ratings (from 80 to 87 in 2009). This move follows violent riots in South Africa’s main cities in 2008. Baghdad (215) retains its position at the bottom of the table, though its index score has increased (from 13.5 to 14.4 in 2009) due to some slight improvements in its infrastructure and steps taken to encourage investment. Nevertheless, the lack of security and stability continue to have a large impact on quality of living and the city’s score remains far behind Bangui (29.3) in the Central African Republic, which is second to last. In the city infrastructure index, most of the region’s cities rank below 100. The exceptions are Dubai (35),Tel Aviv (55) Jerusalem (70), Abu Dhabi (72), Port Louis in Mauritius (92) and Cairo (93). Baghdad (215) is again at the bottom of the list with a city infrastructure score of 19.6, while Port Harcourt in Nigeria is at 214, scoring 30.5. Mr Parakatil continued: “Many countries on the African continent are experiencing continued political and economic unrest, making life for expatriates very difficult. This is generally reflected in the higher compensation and benefits packages offered there by multinationals, compared to other regions of the world.” Asia Pacific Auckland (4) retains its position as the highest ranking city for quality of living in the region. Sydney follows at 10 and Wellington in New Zealand at 12. While the majority of the region’s cities retain a similar ranking to last year, Singapore (26) is the region’s highest riser, up six places since 2008. The city has gained importance as a financial centre and offers a wide range of international and private schools to cater to its expatriate community. Beijing has also moved three places in the ranking, up from 116 to 113, mainly due to improvements in public transport facilities from the Olympic Games last August. Dropping down in the rankings, mainly due to a decline in stability and security are Bangkok (from 109 in 2008 to 120) and Mumbai (from 142 to 148). Thailand’s political turmoil continued throughout 2008 and 2009 with frequent and violent demonstrations and rallies taking place in Bangkok. Terrorist attacks in Mumbai have led to the city’s decline in quality of living for expatriates. Dhaka in Bangladesh holds the lowest ranking in the region at 205. Mr Parakatil commented: “As a region, Asia Pacific is highly diverse. Recent political unrest and terrorist attacks in some cities in the region have negatively impacted the quality of living there. In addition to providing an appropriate hardship allowance, companies need to make sure they review their expatriate strategies by implementing specific safety measures such as ensuring their expatriates’ accommodation is under surveillance and providing effective channels of communication should evacuation be necessary.” For city infrastructure, Singapore has the highest score world-wide (109.1). The city boasts an airport with excellent facilities and connections, as well as an efficient and extensive public transport network. Other high rankers in the region include Hong Kong (8), Sydney (11) and Tokyo (12). Dhaka ranks lowest in the region at 197. Notes for Editors The worldwide rankings are produced from the most recent Worldwide Quality of Living Survey, conducted by Mercer. Individual reports are produced for each city surveyed. Comparative quality of living indexes between a base city and a host city are available, as are multiple city comparisons. Further information is available from Mercer Client Services, on tel. +48 22 434 5383. Alternatively, please visit http://www.mercer.com/qualityofliving'>http://www.mercer.com/qualityofliving Data was largely collected between September and November 2008 and is regularly updated to take account of changing circumstances. In particular, the assessments are revised in the case of any new developments. The Mercer database contains more than 420 cities, however only 215 cities have been considered for the quality of living 2008 ranking in order to compare them from one year to the next. Compensating expatriates to live and work in difficult locations: determining appropriate allowances and incentives The provision of incentives to reward and recognise the efforts that employees and their families make when taking on international assignments remains a typical practice, particularly for difficult locations. Common incentives include a quality of living allowance and mobility premium. Companies need to be able to determine their compensation package in a rational, consistent and systematic way. Quality of living or hardship allowances are designed to compensate expatriates for differences in the quality of living between their home and host locations. The mobility premium is more intended to compensate for the inconvenience of being uprooted and having to work in another country. The former is typically location-related whilst a mobility premium is usually independent of the host location. A number of major international companies combine these premiums but the vast majority of international companies provide them separately. The latter approach has the advantage of clarity and transparency. Mercer hardship allowance recommendations Mercer evaluates local living conditions in all the 420 cities it surveys worldwide. Living conditions are analysed according to 39 factors, grouped in 10 categories: * Political and social environment (political stability, crime, law enforcement, etc) * Economic environment (currency exchange regulations, banking services, etc) * Socio-cultural environment (censorship, limitations on personal freedom, etc) * Health and sanitation (medical supplies and services, infectious diseases, sewage, waste disposal, air pollution, etc) * Schools and education (standard and availability of international schools, etc) * Public services and transportation (electricity, water, public transport, traffic congestion, etc) * Recreation (restaurants, theatres, cinemas, sports and leisure, etc) * Consumer goods (availability of food/daily consumption items, cars, etc) * Housing (housing, household appliances, furniture, maintenance services, etc) * Natural environment (climate, record of natural disasters) The scores attributed to each factor allow for city-to-city comparisons to be made. The result is a Quality of Living Index which compares the relative differences between any two locations. For the indices to be used in a practical manner, Mercer has created a grid that allows companies to link the resulting index to a Quality of Living Allowance amount by recommending a percentage value in relation to the index. The following list of rankings is provided to journalists for reference, and should not be published in full. The top 10 and bottom 10 cities in either list may be reproduced in a table. For a full copy of the city rankings please contact the press office. <table class=MsoNormalTable border=1 cellspacing=1 cellpadding=0 width="100%" style='width:100.0%;background:white;border:outset #0057A6 1.0pt'> <tr style='height:24.0pt'> <td width="10%" style='width:10.0%;border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background: #0057A6;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt;height:24.0pt'> <p><strong><span style='color:white'>Rank 2009</span></strong></p> </td> <td width="10%" style='width:10.0%;border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background: #0057A6;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt;height:24.0pt'> <p class=style3><strong><span style='color:white'>Rank 2008</span></strong></p> </td> <td width="30%" style='width:30.0%;border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background: #0057A6;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt;height:24.0pt'> <p><strong><span style='color:white'>City</span></strong></p> </td> <td width="30%" style='width:30.0%;border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background: #0057A6;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt;height:24.0pt'> <p><strong><span style='color:white'>Country</span></strong></p> </td> <td width="10%" style='width:10.0%;border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background: #0057A6;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt;height:24.0pt'> <p><strong><span style='color:white'>Index 2009</span></strong></p> </td> <td width="10%" style='width:10.0%;border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background: #0057A6;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt;height:24.0pt'> <p><strong><span style='color:white'>Index 2008</span></strong></p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>1</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>2</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>VIENNA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>AUSTRIA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>108.6</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>107.9</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>2</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>1</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>ZURICH</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>SWITZERLAND</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>108</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>108</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>3</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>2</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>GENEVA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>SWITZERLAND</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>107.9</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>107.9</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>4</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>4</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>VANCOUVER</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>CANADA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>107.4</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>107.6</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>4</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>5</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>AUCKLAND</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>NEW ZEALAND</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>107.4</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>107.3</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>6</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>6</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>DUSSELDORF</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>GERMANY</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>107.2</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>107.2</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>7</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>7</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>MUNICH</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>GERMANY</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>107</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>107</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>8</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>7</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>FRANKFURT</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>GERMANY</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>106.8</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>107</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>9</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>9</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>BERN</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>SWITZERLAND</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>106.5</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>106.5</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>10</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>10</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>SYDNEY</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>AUSTRALIA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>106.3</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>106.3</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>11</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>11</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>COPENHAGEN</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>DENMARK</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>106.2</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>106.2</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>12</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>12</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>WELLINGTON</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>NEW ZEALAND</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>105.9</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>105.8</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>13</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>13</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>AMSTERDAM</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>NETHERLANDS</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>105.7</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>105.7</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>14</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>14</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>BRUSSELS</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>BELGIUM</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>105.4</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>105.4</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>15</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>15</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>TORONTO</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>CANADA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>105.3</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>105.3</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>16</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>19</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>OTTAWA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>CANADA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>105</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>104.7</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>16</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>16</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>BERLIN</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>GERMANY</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>105</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>105</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>18</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>17</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>MELBOURNE</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>AUSTRALIA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>104.8</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>104.8</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>19</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>17</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>LUXEMBOURG</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>LUXEMBOURG</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>104.6</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>104.8</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>20</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>20</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>STOCKHOLM</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>SWEDEN</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>104.5</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>104.5</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>21</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>21</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>PERTH</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>AUSTRALIA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>104.3</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>104.3</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>22</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>22</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>MONTREAL</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>CANADA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>104.2</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>104.2</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>23</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>23</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>NURNBERG</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>GERMANY</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>104.1</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>104.1</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>24</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>24</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>OSLO</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>NORWAY</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>103.7</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>103.7</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>25</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>25</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>DUBLIN</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>IRELAND</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>103.6</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>103.5</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>26</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>32</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>SINGAPORE</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>SINGAPORE</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>103.5</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>102.9</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>26</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>25</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>CALGARY</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>CANADA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>103.5</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>103.5</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>28</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>27</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>HAMBURG</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>GERMANY</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>103.4</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>103.4</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>29</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>28</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>HONOLULU, HI</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>UNITED STATES</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>103.1</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>103.1</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>30</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>29</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>SAN FRANCISCO, CA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>UNITED STATES</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>103</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>103</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>30</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>29</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>HELSINKI</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>FINLAND</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>103</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>103</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>30</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>29</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>ADELAIDE</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>AUSTRALIA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>103</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>103</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>33</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>32</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>PARIS</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>FRANCE</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>102.9</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>102.9</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>34</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>34</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>BRISBANE</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>AUSTRALIA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>102.4</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>102.4</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>35</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>35</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>TOKYO</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>JAPAN</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>102.2</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>102.2</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>35</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>37</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>BOSTON, MA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>UNITED STATES</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>102.2</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>101.8</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>37</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>36</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>LYON</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>FRANCE</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>101.9</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>101.9</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>38</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>38</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>YOKOHAMA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>JAPAN</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>101.6</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>101.6</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>38</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>38</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>LONDON</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>UNITED KINGDOM</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>101.6</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>101.6</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>40</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>40</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>KOBE</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>JAPAN</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.9</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.9</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>41</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>41</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>MILAN</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>ITALY</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.8</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.8</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>42</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>48</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>PORTLAND, OR</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>UNITED STATES</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.6</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.2</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>42</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>42</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>BARCELONA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>SPAIN</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.6</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.6</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>44</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>44</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>WASHINGTON, DC</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>UNITED STATES</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.3</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.3</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>44</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>44</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>OSAKA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>JAPAN</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.3</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.3</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>44</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>44</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>LISBON</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>PORTUGAL</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.3</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.3</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>44</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>44</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>CHICAGO, IL</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>UNITED STATES</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.3</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.3</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>48</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>43</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>MADRID</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>SPAIN</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.2</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100.5</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>49</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>49</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>NEW YORK CITY, NY</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>UNITED STATES</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>100</p> </td> </tr> <tr style='height:13.5pt'> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>50</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>50</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>SEATTLE, WA</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>UNITED STATES</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>99.8</p> </td> <td style='border:inset #0057A6 1.0pt;background:#CFE7FF;padding:3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt; height:13.5pt'> <p>99.8</p> </td> </tr> </table> Mercer is a leading global provider of consulting, outsourcing and investment services. Mercer works with clients to solve their most complex benefit and human capital issues, designing and helping manage health, retirement and other benefits. It is a leader in benefit outsourcing. Mercer’s investment services include investment consulting and investment management. Mercer’s 18,000 employees are based in more than 40 countries. The company is a wholly owned subsidiary of Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc., which lists its stock (ticker symbol: MMC) on the New York, Chicago and London stock exchanges. For more information, visit http://www.mercer.com
  16. World's Top 50 Cities by Quality of Living (Table) By Zoya Shilova Aug. 11 2008 (Bloomberg) -- The following table presents the world's top fifty cities by quality of living, according to a survey from Mercer LLC: ============================================================================ Rank Rank City Country Quality of living index 2008 2007 2008 2007 ============================================================================ 1 1 Zurich Switzerland 108.0 108.1 2 3 Vienna Austria 107.9 107.7 2 2 Geneva Switzerland 107.9 108.0 4 3 Vancouver Canada 107.6 107.7 5 5 Auckland New Zealand 107.3 107.3 6 5 Dusseldorf Germany 107.2 107.3 7 8 Munich Germany 107.0 106.9 7 7 Frankfurt Germany 107.0 107.1 9 9 Bern Switzerland 106.5 106.5 10 9 Sydney Australia 106.3 106.5 11 11 Copenhagen Denmark 106.2 106.2 ============================================================================ Rank Rank City Country Quality of living index 2008 2007 2008 2007 ============================================================================ 12 12 Wellington New Zealand 105.8 105.8 13 13 Amsterdam Netherlands 105.7 105.7 14 14 Brussels Belgium 105.4 105.6 15 15 Toronto Canada 105.3 105.4 16 16 Berlin Germany 105.0 105.2 17 17 Melbourne Australia 104.8 105.0 17 18 Luxembourg Luxembourg 104.8 104.8 19 18 Ottawa Canada 104.7 104.8 20 20 Stockholm Sweden 104.5 104.7 21 21 Perth Australia 104.3 104.5 22 22 Montreal Canada 104.2 104.3 23 23 Nurnberg Germany 104.1 104.2 24 26 Oslo Norway 103.7 103.5 25 27 Dublin Ireland 103.5 103.3 25 24 Calgary Canada 103.5 103.6 27 24 Hamburg Germany 103.4 103.6 28 27 Honolulu U.S. 103.1 103.3 ============================================================================ Rank Rank City Country Quality of living index 2008 2007 2008 2007 ============================================================================ 29 29 San Francisco U.S. 103.0 103.2 29 30 Helsinki Finland 103.0 103.1 29 30 Adelaide Australia 103.0 103.1 32 34 Singapore Singapore 102.9 102.5 32 33 Paris France 102.9 102.7 34 32 Brisbane Australia 102.4 102.8 35 35 Tokyo Japan 102.2 102.3 36 36 Lyon France 101.9 101.9 37 36 Boston U.S. 101.8 101.9 38 38 Yokohama Japan 101.6 101.7 38 39 London U.K. 101.6 101.2 40 40 Kobe Japan 100.9 101.0 41 49 Milan Italy 100.8 99.0 42 41 Barcelona Spain 100.6 100.6 43 42 Madrid Spain 100.5 100.5 44 44 Washington, DC U.S. 100.3 100.4 44 42 Osaka Japan 100.3 100.5 ============================================================================ Rank Rank City Country Quality of living index 2008 2007 2008 2007 ============================================================================ 44 47 Lisbon Portugal 100.3 100.1 44 44 Chicago U.S. 100.3 100.4 48 46 Portland U.S. 100.2 100.3 49 48 New York City U.S. 100.0 100.0 50 49 Seattle U.S. 99.8 99.9 http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=aGLoywSw2XP4
  17. Montreal could do worse than look like the City of Light Our island could combat sprawl and still be a lot less dense than Paris HENRY AUBIN The Gazette Tuesday, December 30, 2008 Urban sprawl continued its mad march this year. The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. reports that 73 per cent of the 20,693 housing starts in the Montreal metropolitan region were built off Montreal Island in the first 11 months of the year. That's up from 70 per cent a year ago. Another measure of the relative health of the 450 area code that surrounds the island: Home building there is down a mere one per cent despite the lame economy. New homes on the island meanwhile have dipped by a significant 15 per cent. Every time I write critically of urban sprawl, some readers object. They raise a serious point that needs an answer. These dissenters do not defend sprawl blindly. They acknowledge that the exodus of the middle class from the island to the 450's new housing subdivisions weakens the island's tax base, thereby causing a vicious circle in which low tax revenues mean poor services that in turn help drive people off the island. The defenders of sprawl also concede that, because it relies on cars for transport, sprawl is a big contributor to climate change. They even admit that it weakens the province's economy since most of the billions of dollars the public spends on cars and gas go out of Quebec (which produces neither fossil fuel nor the cars that run on it). And, finally, they allow that, because the great majority of people who leave the island are francophone, sprawl bears much of the blame for the declining presence of French on the island - a trend that fuels political tensions. But these problems don't matter to the justifiers of sprawl. Their rebuttal boils down to one word: space. The island, they say, lacks enough land for all the people who seek a good quality of life at a moderate price. I've responded that the island still has a lot of land - vacant or under-developed - that would be good for housing. But this has never convinced the pro-sprawl camp, and it's easy to see why. A lot of this land is not all that terrific. Nor is it cheap. And even if half of the bungalows and townhouses built in the 450 every year were to be built on the island, in only a few years all the available land would be used up. But now comes a fresh take on the situation. Richard Bergeron, the Montreal city councillor and head of Projet Montréal, asks us to consider Paris, a city that is famous for its beauty and its high quality of life. He points out that the municipality of Paris (as distinct from its suburbs) has 2.2 million people, not that many more than Montreal Island (1.8 million). Montreal Island (500 square kilometres) contains almost five times as much land as Paris (105 sq. km.). If it were developed the same way as the City of Light, he notes, the island could hold 10 million people. Bergeron, who has a doctorate in land-use planning, is not suggesting that we cram 10 million people onto the island - that's more than Quebec's population. Rather, his argument is that a new approach to developing the island could mean more than enough room forever to accommodate all the people who otherwise would join the exodus. Paris is an enviable place to live. It has parks galore. Its tallest residential buildings have six floors. The price of real estate does not exclude the middle class:confused: . Public transit serves residents superbly. And if my many cousins who live there are any indication, it's great for families:confused: . Dense development, in short, can be fully compatible with a high quality of life. But it takes good, foresighted planning. Such planning is alien to our political establishment. The Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal, the regional planning body that Mayor Gerald Tremblay heads, is an ostrich when it comes to climate change. The Quebec government is worse: It keeps lavishly subsidizing sprawldom's new highways, waste-treatment plants, schools, hospitals and other institutions, making a move to the 450 financially enticing. Here's my prediction for 2009: Our infatuation with sprawl will slowly start to change during the year. Barack Obama will be in the White House in three weeks. He sounds like he means it when he says the U.S. must cut greenhouse-gas emissions by a staggering 80 per cent by 2050. Canada will have to get in step. This will mean a sharp shift of urban development toward denser population clustering. Montreal can - if it has the brains - do this well. There are worse fates than emulating Paris. [email protected] © The Gazette (Montreal) 2008
  18. UQAM's financial fiasco is a major problem for Montreal The university is key to educating our local workforce HENRY AUBIN The Gazette Tuesday, June 10, 2008 I'd argue that the No. 1 short-term problem that the Montreal area faces today is the financial fiasco at the Université du Québec à Montréal. (Long-term problems such as decaying infrastructure and adapting the region to climate change are another story.) It's easy to overlook UQAM's importance. Its not the most prestigious of the four universities that are the four pillars of the region's knowledge economy. Yet UQAM's role in forming an educated local workforce is arguably greater than that of the most internationally renowned school, McGill. That's because a greater share - far greater - of its graduates actually remain in the metropolitan area and make their careers here. UQAM's real-estate expansion has rung up a debt costing $50,000 a day in interest. It could reach half a billion dollars by 2012. To reduce costs, the university cut its operating budget by 10 per cent, hiked student fees and announced the elimination of 30 specialized programs (each of which typically contains four courses). In all, it's cutting $41 million per year for five years. But this is hardly enough. To be sure, the Charest government would never let the university downsize drastically. UQAM is too valuable economically. The political cost to any government would be too great. But there has been profound damage to the institution's reputation - which is ironic, given that the aim of the expansion, centred on the construction of two glittering new downtown campuses, was in large part to lend UQAM prestige. More important, however, will be the damage to the calibre of the education itself. How many professors will not be hired? How many more courses will be dropped? How many potential students will decide against going to university because of spiralling fees and slipping quality? The crisis raises two questions. The first: Who ought to pay for whatever is needed to bring the university back to health? The bill could come to about $300 million. Should the university pay? Or should Quebec taxpayers pick up this hefty tab? The argument in favour of the university paying for itself would be that it is the author of its misfortune. No one told it to build the science campus (completed between Sherbrooke St. and Place des Arts) and the humanities campus (unfinished at the Voyageur bus terminal). UQAM's new head, Claude Corbo, who has the unenviable job of cleaning up UQAM's finances, made the case last week that Quebec taxpayers should pay. I have deep respect for Corbo's record of public service over the decades, but his argument is weak. He said that since Quebec paid for the Laval métro's cost overruns, it should now pay for UQAM's. That would bolster the idea that planners of public projects can toss prudence to the winds. Indeed, as Quebec's auditor-general showed last week, accountability was dysfunctional at every level. UQAM's head at the time, Roch Denis, kept real-estate details from UQAM's board of governors, the board placed too much trust in Denis, the body that oversees the Université du Québec's six universities across the province was asleep at the switch and so was the person at the top, then-education minister Jean-Marc Fournier. The problem for his successor, Michelle Courchesne, however, is this: If she does the principled thing and makes UQAM pay for its errors, this could further harm the institution's quality. No one wants that. The second question is: How do you change the culture of laxity the is at the root of this project? The UQAM and Laval métro debacle are examples of a trend. Major projects in Montreal tend to elude serious study. McGill and the Université de Montréal wasted years dreaming up grandiose hospitals that, even now that their scale is smaller, keep climbing in cost. Highway 25 and U de M's Outremont campus have never received adequate study. And two big projects of the day, Quartier des spectacles and the private Griffintown mega-project are also avoiding credible scrutiny. I've written about this absence of checks and balances for four years. The void is as glaring as ever. True, the arrival of public-private partnerships (in the case of the hospitals and the highway) could keep taxpayers from getting hit by cost overruns. But PPPs address the management of projects, not their justification. The core problem remains After the Olympic Stadium fiasco, a provincial inquiry headed by the late Judge Albert Malouf urged screening of major projects by independent experts. How many more clinkers must Quebecers endure before politicians accept that common sense? - - - The knowledge economy's four pillars The Université du Québec à Montreal produces the second most diplomas and certificates of Montreal's universities. The figures are from 2006. University Baccalaureat Masters Doctorate Total* Concordia 4,379 1,080 72 5,833 McGill 4,665 1,499 345 7,608 UQAM 4,466 1,542 115 10,303 Univ. de Montréal 5,030 1,433 257 11,286 Source: Ministry of Education *including certificates http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/features/viewpoints/story.html?id=c694a84a-2719-4a9b-ac0c-b290eb76b092
  19. Dans le QDS, sur Bleury http://montreal.eater.com/2015/2/16/8046489/downtown-montreal-new-butcher-sandwich-shop-dans-la-cote-david- From the ex-chef at Le Réservoir. Chef David Aghapekian, late of Plateau craft brewpub Le Réservoir, is about to give Downtown Montreal Boucherie Dans La Côte, a butcher shop with prepared foods and complementary sandwich counter. The makeover of the old La Congolaise at 2123 de Bleury, below Sherbrooke, is almost complete. A source close to Aghapekian tells Eater that the chef spent a month in search of quality, small-scale producers througout Quebec. No word yet on whether Aghapekian's significant other, Chloé Germain-Fredette of Les Chocolats de Chloé fame, will get some counter space. Boucherie Dans La Côte [Official Site] http://www.boucheriedanslacote.com/ sent via Tapatalk
  20. If anyone else is as obsessed with sidewalks as I am, you may enjoy this map I've made of good quality and renovated sidewalks in Montreal. Pretty much anything different from the typical ugly concrete sidewalks makes the cut. Some of them are still under construction/renovation. I can actually draw most of these from memory, but I still had to look some of them up. I'm sure I missed some, so feedback is welcome! Montreal - Sidewalks