Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Pinned posts
  • 2 years later...
  • Replies 3k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

On pourrait bannir Rocco temporairement pendant la pandémie? Il fait que répéter la même affaire sur chaque fil. 🙄

Un peu déçu car on y apprend pas grand chose que l’on ne savait pas vraiment sinon que le Royalmount 2.0 présenté en Hiver tient toujours selon Carbonleo. Il est donc loin d’être mort comme le prétend

Montreal will one day regret its 'think small' attitude towards high-rises. Quebec City will have Le Phare at 250M, Brossard or Laval will probably beat us to it locally. Now that the economy is stron

Posted Images

On 2020-02-04 at 3:54 PM, LexD said:

I've meant to reply earlier, but at my last attempt on this cellphone earlier this week, my answers got erased by a mishap on the finicky keyboard! 😩

So, here i go again!

■ Calgary, Edmonton & Toronto proportionally DO compete with us in terms of sprawl, yet they beat us in per capita growth! TO's exurbs beyond Hamilton, Kitchener-Waterloo-Cambridge, Guelph, Barrie, Peterborough, Port Hope, etc. make Mtl's Lachute, St. Jérôme, Joliette & other satellite towns & surrounding smaller low-density communities pale in comparison... 😨

- The Ontario places you mention cannot be compared with the Quebec ones. None of those cities are part of the GTA. They are part of the Golden Horseshoe and most are independant to the GTA and self sustainsable (most have there own CBD) these cities are more akin to Sherbrooke , Trois-Rivieres, Valleyfield and Cornwall. As for the Quebec cities you do mention, they are all part of the CMM and many of its residents work on the island of Montreal.

👉 Albeit those Golden Horseshoe cities are economically independent, and generally quite bigger than the GMtl exurbs, there's nonetheless a great share of their inhabitants commuting to various areas of the GTA for work, namely Mississauga, North York and TO. downtowns. One of the major traits of the dynamics at stake is that the GTA has one of the best commuter train systems in NA, one which the CMM probably couldn't even dream to equal (at both its present levels of coverage and service) before at least 2-3 decades!

Also, in spite of being closer to Mtl, comparatively to the aforementioned bigger-sized ON cities are from the GTA, Lachute, St. Jérôme and Joliette are located outside of the CMM!

* * *

■ I strongly disagree that this old American dream model doesn't exist elsewhere in Canada! As i wrote earlier, ON and BC cities have taken the lead, but we're gradually playing catch-up. (Finally!) 

- I'm not saying these developements dont exist elsewhere, im saying that in other canadian cities, for over 20 years they have taken a backseat to smarter devellopements, namely TOD's and residential densification of downtown cores in cities like Toronto and Vancouver. In Montreal we still celebrate and favour this archaic environmentally unfriendly form of sprawl.

👉 ON major and intermediate cities and their burbs have been densifying for over 2 decades (especially TO., ever since the creation of the "megacity" in 1998 by the ON conservative govt. of Mike Harris), but Vancouver (outside of dt) did so mainly since the EcoDensity program was voted in 2006. Here, your use of "in other Canadian cities" may be misleading, as not much wide-spread systematic intense TOD-like densification seems to be happening outside ON & BC major cities...

There's also a tinge of distortion in the above latter phrase. Urban sprawl is evermore denounced in the GMtl, including in municipal entities such as the Mtl Agglo Council, Lvl, Longueuil Agglo Council, and of course the CMM! (You're right to highlight the fact the program lacks "teeth".)

The newest problem is that towns located outside of the CMM aren't bound by the PMAD, and are therefore making efforts to attract households from the GMtl periphery, which sees a fast-growing market increase in real estate, as it struggles to keep up with the central boroughs' pace...

And here the conservative-leaning CAQ provincial govt has started siding with small exurbs asking for agriculture-zoned lands to be zoned for low-density neighbourhoods... This govt opposes a much-needed inner city metro line which would serve over half a million inhabitants, but rather seems to favour building light metro lines to serve towns with populations as low as 30-50 k inhabitants (Chambly, Boisbriand, Mirabel)... 😒

* * *

■ Disagreed regarding the highlighted phrase! Basically, other than more or less heavy public transit lines, it's the highway system that ensures a metropolis' mobility. Mtl has an "overdeveloped" hwy system that encompasses way more sectors than TO's or Vancouver's Greater areas, with seven (!) E-W hwys (counting Hwy 50), and 6 (!) N-S (counting Hwy 30 between the 40 and Valleyfield's Grande Île). Of course, our hwy network is older, and offers less capacity per corridor than TO's major ones, but that's also a matter of induced demand, which would be a complex tangent to include in this discussion...

- Montreal has more highway infrastructure due to the first wave of urban sprawl from the 60's. Toronto and Vancouver dont need more highways because their growth has been based off sustainable developement (last 25yrs). Its not an anomaly that we have the longest commutes in the country .  Take Sainte Dorothy for example, the only way into montreal is by the highway 13 , now take a look at chomedy ouest , and all northen neighborhoods extending as far as OKA...they all have to take the 13. There is no solution to this because of the geography. If this were to happen in Toronto, alternate routes would be available or could be created at lower cost and lower disruption to existing areas.

Our bridges have become narrow funnels for massive sprawl. We should work twice as hard at countering sprawl (then other cities), but we do the opposite.

👉 I disagree with many assertions / exagerations here:

1° Mtl's road infras are old, indeed, but TO. isn't the best example of sustainable development, as motorists' average commutes are the longest in the country, and its major hwys are the most congested in the country (not Mtl's, however as we're pretty close right behind);

2° Vancouver hasn't been focused on "more sustainable development" (which is the very term we shall always use) for as much as 25 years;

3° Ste. Dorothée has a train station located on the most efficient commuter train line in the Greater Mtl (the very reason CDPQ Infra has joined it to the old South Shore LRT project, so to create a more economically-viable network);

4° yes, our hwy bridges and tunnels are funnels (just as the GTA's hwys), however it would be quite hard to build a case proving it would be cheaper (or either more expensive!) to build new hwy infras in the GTA, Vs enlarging our older most saturated hwys, such as the Métropolitaine between both segments of the 15, the 20 West and East (especially westbound between Ste. Julie and Bouchervl), the 10 in Brossard, and the Décarie / Métropolitaine interchange...

* * *

I'll try and reply to your 2 last paragraphs soon.

Cheers!

Link to post
Share on other sites

05:00 14 février 2020Par: Henri Ouellette VézinaMétro

Royalmount: «tout est mis en œuvre» pour réduire les GES, dit Carbonleo devant l’OCPM

https://journalmetro.com/actualites/montreal/2420125/royalmount-tout-est-mis-en-oeuvre-pour-reduire-les-ges-dit-carbonleo-devant-locpm/

Photo: Pablo Ortiz/MétroLe chantier du projet Royalmount, dans Ville Mont-Royal

Alors que Carbonleo assure «tout mettre en œuvre» à l’heure actuelle pour diminuer les émissions de gaz à effet de serre (GES) de son complexe multifonctionnel Royalmount, une nouvelle mobilisation s’organise contre le mégaprojet. Si le promoteur soutient qu’il pourra parvenir à une «réduction de 10 000 tonnes de CO2» annuellement en intégrant du résidentiel, des organismes rétorquent que ces chiffres n’accotent en rien la pollution qui sera engendrée.

«L’ajout d’une fonction résidentielle à Royalmount contribuerait à garder les gens sur l’île et en retirer une partie du réseau routier, explique à Métro le VP de Carbonleo, Claude Marcotte. Le processus de changement de zonage suit son cours. Les élus de la Ville de Mont-Royal se prononceront après avoir complété l’étude du dossier.»

Son groupe présentait jeudi soir ses objectifs devant l’Office de consultation publique de Montréal (OCPM), qui entend actuellement les intérêts de plusieurs organismes en vue du développement du secteur Namur-Hippodrome, dans l’ouest de l’île.

Un projet «carboneutre»

Dans le mémoire remis à l’OCPM dont Métro a obtenu copie, Carbonleo affirme que «si les gens vivent dans un quartier où ils travaillent et se divertissent, leurs déplacements s’en trouveront grandement diminués». L’ajout «d’éléments de développement durable», dont la nature n’a pas été précisée, serait au cœur de la réduction des GES envisagée. À terme, Royalmount pourrait être «carboneutre», argue-t-on.

D’après M. Marcotte, le Royalmount et le développement de Namur-Hippodrome partagent «les mêmes défis en matière de mobilité». Un point de vue qui s’oppose radicalement à celui de la Ville de Montréal. La mairesse Valérie Plante estime effectivement que le projet de quartier carboneutre et vert, projeté dans le secteur, pourrait être décrit comme «l’anti-Royalmount».

«Royalmount a évolué depuis sa présentation initiale.» -Claude Marcotte, VP de Carbonleo, disant vouloir développer un environnement «attrayant et bien desservi» par le transport actif pour lutter contre l’étalement urbain.

L’entreprise dévoilera d’ici la fin février une nouvelle mouture de son projet, laquelle fera «écho aux idées, commentaires et opinions recueillis en 2019», promet-on. «Nous voulons faire de Royalmount un projet écoresponsable, de la conception à la construction jusqu’à son opération», lit-on dans le rapport.

Mobilisation contre Royalmount

Appelé à réagir, le porte-parole de l’organisme Royalement contre Royalmount, Pierre Avignon, n’en revient pas de «l’hypocrisie» de Carbonleo.

«On parle de 10 000 tonnes de CO2, mais c’est une baisse par rapport à la pollution totale du projet qu’ils vont déjà provoquer eux-mêmes. Le chiffre n’est pas non plus indépendant. Ça prend un acteur externe pour évaluer tout ça», lâche-t-il.

Le regroupement citoyen organise jeudi prochain un rassemblement pour s’opposer à la vision «contre-productive» du promoteur Carbonleo. D’après M. Avignon, plusieurs partis d’opposition à l’Assemblée nationale y seront. Une manifestation aura aussi lieu en mars prochain pour sommer Québec de bloquer le projet.

«Nous demandons au ministre de l’Environnement [Benoit Charette] d’investiguer en profondeur. Il a un pouvoir d’enquête, en vertu de la loi. Qu’il nous dise précisément à quel point ce projet est polluant.» -Pierre Avignon, porte-parole de Royalement contre Royalmount

Des contrastes apparents?

Les données qu’avance le promoteur contrastent avec plusieurs rapports d’experts. Notamment celui de l’Institut de recherche et d’informations socioéconomiques (IRIS). Ce dernier soutient que l’augmentation de la congestion routière aux abords du Royalmount ajoutera près de 16 000 tonnes de CO2. Soit l’équivalent de la moyenne annuelle des GES produits par 1040 Canadiens.

Au Conseil régional de l’environnement de Montréal (CRE-MTL), le responsable des dossiers transport, Blaise Rémillard, abonde dans le même sens.

«C’est l’équivalent de faire une économie sur un achat dont on n’a pas besoin, explique-t-il. C’est comme un Hummer électrique. Certes, on développe des dispositifs environnementaux. Mais le projet en lui-même va amener plus de congestion, alors que le secteur est déjà saturé.»

Même si Québec refuse d’imposer un moratoire pour le moment, le CRE-MTL «n’est pas encore prêt à accepter que ce projet-là se réalise», dit M. Rémillard. «Il n’y a pas de meilleur moyen de propulser un développement pareil. Un centre d’achat, ça ne répond aucunement aux besoins de la communauté», conclut-il.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Il y a 1 heure, ToxiK a dit :

La pollution ne sera pas "engendrée" par le Royalmount, elle sera engendrée par les clients, et cette pollution sera engendrée autant si les clients se rendent au Royalmount que s'ils se rendent au Carrefour Laval. 

Faux. Attirer des clients dans un secteur déjà fortement congestionné aura un impact négatif beaucoup plus dommageable que n'importe où ailleurs dans le réseau. C'est pour cela que la Ville de Montréal et bien d'autres intervenants contestent les prétentions du promoteur. Surtout que ce dernier n'a jamais fait la démonstration d'études de circulation indépendantes, convaincantes et exhaustives sur le plan professionnel, et bien sûr produites par une firme extérieure reconnue. Donc à date seuls les chiffres de la Ville ont la crédibilité nécessaire pour nous éclairer sur le sujet et elles ont même été corroborées par le MTQ.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Soyons honnête?.

You can’t  seriously believe that all of the criticisms here reflect some hidden issue that cannot  be revealed publicly. Your preface is nothing more than a cheap, thoughtless debating trick.

montreal has an urban tissue that is unique in North America. This project is a generic  suburban car-oriented model. Maybe it will harm downtown commerce; maybe it won’t. If it does that would be sad. If it doesn’t, it will still be a sad blot on our landscape.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2020-02-14 at 7:37 AM, acpnc said:

[...] des organismes rétorquent que ces chiffres n’accotent en rien la pollution qui sera engendrée.

«L’ajout d’une fonction résidentielle à Royalmount contribuerait à garder les gens sur l’île et en retirer une partie du réseau routier, explique à Métro le VP de Carbonleo, Claude Marcotte. [...]

Un projet «carboneutre»

Dans le mémoire remis à l’OCPM dont Métro a obtenu copie, Carbonleo affirme que «si les gens vivent dans un quartier où ils travaillent et se divertissent, leurs déplacements s’en trouveront grandement diminués». L’ajout «d’éléments de développement durable», dont la nature n’a pas été précisée, serait au cœur de la réduction des GES envisagée. À terme, Royalmount pourrait être «carboneutre», argue-t-on.

D’après M. Marcotte, le Royalmount et le développement de Namur-Hippodrome partagent «les mêmes défis en matière de mobilité».

L’entreprise dévoilera d’ici la fin février une nouvelle mouture de son projet, laquelle fera «écho aux idées, commentaires et opinions recueillis en 2019», promet-on. «Nous voulons faire de Royalmount un projet écoresponsable, de la conception à la construction jusqu’à son opération», lit-on dans le rapport.

[...] Un centre d’achat, ça ne répond aucunement aux besoins de la communauté», conclut-il.

Carbonleo a raison dans une certaine mesure, et je m'efforce de voir le positif du projet, puisque peu importe que l'on y adhère ou que l'on s'y oppose, il devrait voir le jour! Je crois qu'ils exagèrent toutefois la portée de l'aspect "développement durable" de leur projet; ça semble être de l'éco-blanchissage...

Une composante résidentielle en hauteur contribuerait positivement à la redensification démographique du coeur de l'île, tout comme dans le secteur BB. 👍

Les 2 secteurs regorgent d'un potentiel d'accroître l'usage des TeC ET de la mobilité active. Mais pour que cette dernière puisse prendre son essor, ça prendrait absolument des pistes cyclables protégées N-S dans les axes Clanranald et Cavendish avec franchissement des obstacles ferroviaires, qui forcent présentement à effectuer des détours allant de 2 à plus de 10 km selon les origines-destinations... 🚈🚌🚴🏃🚶

Sérieux, je trouve que les opposants se discréditent de plus en plus en affirmant des biais de confirmation du genre "Un centre d'achats ne répond aucunement aux besoins de la communauté" (pas à tous les besoins, certes, mais je serais bien surpris si plus de 10% de la population vivant en périphérie n'avait pas mis le pied dans un centre d'achats en 2019!) Et si rien ne se construisait finalement sur ce site pour les prochaines 10-15 années, où donc ces écolos s'imaginent-ils que cette clientèle potentielle ira habiter, si ce n'était plus loin en périphérie? Eesh🙈

J'ai bien hâte au dévoilement d'une mouture plus définitive du projet vers fin fév., mais je ne retiens pas mon souffle quant à l'aspect architectural...

Note: Ce qui devrait être rappelé plus souvent est que depuis des décennies, la congestion sur la Métropolitaine et Décarie amplifie déjà énormément la pollution émise par les véhicules y circulant. Sans compter que l'accroissement de la circulation causé par un centre d'achats devrait surtout être hors-pointes. ✔

On 2020-02-14 at 12:54 PM, acpnc said:

Faux. Attirer des clients dans un secteur déjà fortement congestionné aura un impact négatif beaucoup plus dommageable que n'importe où ailleurs dans le réseau. C'est pour cela que la Ville de Montréal et bien d'autres intervenants contestent les prétentions du promoteur. Surtout que ce dernier n'a jamais fait la démonstration d'études de circulation indépendantes, convaincantes et exhaustives sur le plan professionnel, et bien sûr produites par une firme extérieure reconnue. Donc à date seuls les chiffres de la Ville ont la crédibilité nécessaire pour nous éclairer sur le sujet et elles ont même été corroborées par le MTQ.

Sans devoir être d'acc avec tous les aspects du projet, reconnais-tu qu'il y a déjà un problème dans le secteur, et qu'il faille sine qua non que le MTQ intervienne, peu importe le type de Rmt qui sera bâti? (Ou non si Québec intervenait, ce qui ne semble toutefois pas parti pour se produire.)

Link to post
Share on other sites
il y a 50 minutes, mont royal a dit :

Soyons honnête?.

You can’t  seriously believe that all of the criticisms here reflect some hidden issue that cannot  be revealed publicly. Your preface is nothing more than a cheap, thoughtless debating trick.

montreal has an urban tissue that is unique in North America. This project is a generic  suburban car-oriented model. Maybe it will harm downtown commerce; maybe it won’t. If it does that would be sad. If it doesn’t, it will still be a sad blot on our landscape.

I do believe the city of Montréal doesn't want the competition from Royalmount and they hide behind other arguments (good or bad) to try block the project the same way Québécor tries to stop Bell from buiyng V.  Organizations don't like competition because it force them to work harder to win customers over  It is normal.  I like competition, but I suppose that it is just cheap and thoughtless from my part...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright, this is my 2nd round replying to your latest reply. (Albeit i'm not sure that you've actually read the 1st round... ?)

I must also admit that you bring many good points.

The CMM and City of Mtl have a lot of inroads to explore in order to develop their territory in a really more sustainable way... 😒

On 2020-02-04 at 3:54 PM, LexD said:

■ Yes, it does lack ambition. Keep in mind it's a work-in-progress which can be readjusted by the involved municipalities and other actors once every 2 years! And nope, it actually applies to the whole CMM territory, which encompasses the North Shore's 2nd and 3rd belts, Vaudreuil, Laval, the South Shore's 1st and 2nd belts.

It applies to the whole CMM but it is not enforced. The PMAD should be the rule the thumb but since its conception, it seems to be simply a document of ''recommended guidelines''. What is currently being enforced is borough urban plans (or municipality). Most borough urban plans do not have the zoning that permits the density needed to follow the PMAD.  So whenever a project is proposed that is conform to the PMAD , it still has to go through a public consultation before allowing a zoning change. It takes very little to shut down a developpement. A minimal amount of votes is all that is needed to request a referendum and most councils will choose to shut down a project before going through a costly referendum. So the PMAD looks OK on paper only.

👉 I quite agree with you here. Some more or less central boroughs practically act as NIMBYs against building higher than 4-8 floors, namely: Ahuntsic, Mercier-Hochelaga-Maisonneuve, Outremont, Le Plateau, Verdun (outside Nuns' I.), Villeray-St-Michel-Parc-Ex... 🙈

* * *

■ Yep, the Projet Mtl-controlled Executive Council so far seems to be downtown-centric. However, many dissenting voices inside the party are evermore manifest, too. Nope, the party doesn't believe everyone shall cycle nor take the pink line, come on! (Or else they wouldn't have boosted road maintenance as they did, while not really increasing the dismal bike network budget since Coderre.)

- The bus only new urban boulevard linking north ouest pierrefonds to the kirkland REM

- Her pilot project road closure of camilien houde

- Her criticism of the Royalmount commercial aspect of the project, claiming it threatens the suppremacy of downtown shopping (all that downtown needs to sustain itself is more of what has been going on for last few years which is massive high density residential developement).

Road maintenance is a security issue , it has to get done.

👉 1° That bus-only blvd. sure doesn't seem to me like the best idea in a suburban area, especially not outside of rush hours...

2° Well, that CH closure pilot project was ended, as promised, and not reconducted. This was in no small part a nod to the opponents' mobilization, which had people from other Qc and ON cities signing the petition against, whereas the pro-closure petition was targeting Montrealers! (Noteworthy is the fact it's almost always easier to mobilize opponents than people satisfied by any project!)

Seriously, other more progressive municipal administrations have been way more starkly pro-cyclism than Mtl: Amsterdam (and pretty much all other Dutch cities), Berlin, København, NYC, Paris, Portland (OR), Vancouver, etc.!

3° That criticism from VP lacks seriousness, as i was present at the 1st session of a City of Mtl commission regarding the Rmt project: the data presented by the City's economists was estimating business losses to Mtl's commercial arteries to max out at 7% on average, with a slightly higher than average rate in St. Laurent and CdN-NDG boroughs, and lower on the eastern part of the island, the Plateau and downtown. Rmt would basically cause less harm than online shopping already does, and won't stop anytime soon...

However, the losses expected to be caused to "neighbouring" shopping centers might hover above 15%, especially in St. Laurent and Ahuntsic-Cartierville boroughs. (The data wasn't analysing the outcomes for TMR and West Island cities.)

* * *

Thanks for your replies, and the exchange of perspective, like i say you bring good points!

👉 It's reciprocal! 😄

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Similar Content

    • By Gilbert
      1500 Sherbrooke Ouest
       
      Architectes: DCYSM
      Fin de la construction:2001
      Utilisation: Résidentiel/Hôtellier
       
      Emplacement: Centre-ville, Montréal
       
      ? mètres - 32 étages
       

    • By Gilbert
      Place de la Cité Internationale – Phase 2
      Architectes: Fox&Fowle
      Utilisation: Bureaux
      Emplacement: Quartier International, Montréal
      Descriptions:
      - Le terrain que la tour occupera est maintenant un grand espace gazonné.

      Source : rosey12387
    • By UrbMtl
      Bleury/Sherbrooke

      Ce coin ne cesse de se densifier…
      Hotel de 270 chambres. 
         
    • By CFurtado
      Tom Perlmutter rêve de déménager l'ONF dans le Quartier des spectacles. Inspiré par les bureaux de Google dans le monde et par l'édifice de l'Art Gallery of Ontario, Tom Perlmutter voit le futur de l'Office national du film dans un espace accessible aux créateurs comme au grand public.
       
      «J'aimerais un site plus accessible aux créateurs et au grand public, créer un espace vivant, explique Tom Perlmutter, rencontré la semaine dernière. On parle avec la Ville de Montréal: ce serait beaucoup plus intéressant, par exemple, d'être dans le Quartier des spectacles, avec les Montréalais, de créer un espace créatif.»
       
      Construit sur le modèle des studios américains, le bâtiment qui héberge les bureaux de l'Office depuis 1956 n'est plus adapté aux besoins de l'ONF, croit M. Perlmutter. Longs couloirs menant à une multitude de petits bureaux, ou studios délaissés par l'Office: «On n'a pas besoin de tout ça», dit-il.
       
      Le gouvernement fédéral étudie les besoins de l'ONF, et le ministère des Travaux publics, propriétaire de l'actuel siège de l'ONF, émettra des recommandations dès l'été 2011. Situés au 3155 chemin de la Côte-de-Liesse, les bureaux de l'ONF ne correspondent plus aux exigences de l'époque.
       
      «J'ai préparé il y a quelques semaines un document de discussion et j'ai cherché ailleurs ce qu'il est possible de faire, dit Tom Perlmutter. On pense qu'à Toronto, par exemple, dans les grands projets comme le ROM et l'AGO de Frank Gehry, il y a vraiment une architecture intéressante et vivante.»
       
      L'espace dont rêve Tom Perlmutter abriterait tant les créateurs travaillant pour l'Office qu'un café ou un cinéma accessible au grand public comme aux réalisateurs ne tournant pas pour l'ONF. Parmi les images que Tom Perlmutter a intégré à son document de discussion, on retrouve les espaces ouverts, ludiques et conviviaux qui sont devenus la marque des bureaux de Google dans le monde.
       
      Ce déménagement, insiste Tom Perlmutter, ne répondrait pas seulement à des considérations esthétiques. «Fondamentalement on veut revenir à un espace créatif et d'échange avec les créateurs et le grand public, dit-il. On veut devenir une source de fierté pour les Montréalais et créer un centre mondial d'innovation, un espace d'expérimentation du numérique.»
       
      Discussions
       
      Concrètement, Tom Perlmutter dit avoir entamé des discussions avec la Ville de Montréal et Travaux publics Canada. Hier, l'arrondissement de Ville-Marie disait n'avoir reçu «aucune demande en ce sens-là». Quant à Travaux publics, nous n'avions pas obtenu des réponses au moment d'écrire ces lignes.
       
      Mais le déménagement n'est pas le seul projet que Tom Perlmutter a en tête pour l'ONF. Une annonce concernant de nouveaux projets pour l'internet sera faite en juin. On a également appris que l'ONF négocie actuellement avec la chaîne franco-allemande Arte un partenariat concernant le numérique.
       
      Enfin, du côté du documentaire traditionnel, l'ONF produira le prochain film de Richard Desjardins et Robert Monderie. Après Le peuple invisible, le duo s'intéressera à l'histoire des mines au Québec et en Ontario. Sarah Polley (Away from Her) réalisera aussi pour l'ONF son premier long métrage documentaire. On ignore encore le sujet de ce film.
       
      http://moncinema.cyberpresse.ca/nouvelles-et-critiques/nouvelles/nouvelle-cinema/11461-lonf-reve-de-grands-espaces.html



×
×
  • Create New...