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52% oppose Bill C-10

Proposed change targets filmmakers. Don't censor content by refusing tax credits, slim majority of Canadians say in survey

 

TIFFANY CRAWFORD, Canwest News Service

Published: 6 hours ago

 

A slim majority of Canadians believe it would be wrong for the government to screen the content of films and deny tax credits to projects it deems offensive, a new Ipsos Reid poll conducted for Canwest News Service and Global TV indicates.

 

The poll, conducted from June 10 to 12, found that 52 per cent of the 1,002 Canadians surveyed disagree with Bill C-10, a proposed change to the Income Tax Act that would deny tax money to filmmakers whose content is "contrary to public policy."

 

At 62 per cent, residents of film-industry-heavy British Columbia are most likely to say the government is "wrong" to interfere in such a way. That's followed by those living in the mostly Conservative province of Alberta at 57 per cent, indicating the reaction of Canadians is largely ideological.

 

"(The bill) has obviously touched a nerve," said John Wright with Ipsos Reid.

 

"If it's not going to pass the sniff test, it's going to be gagged," said the senior vice-president of Ipsos Reid. "It has a good majority in the country that are going to go against this."

 

Although the idea to deny tax credits was raised under the previous Liberal government, Wright suggests people may be concerned about the "slippery slope" of censorship with the Conservative Party.

 

"While it may have been acceptable under the Liberals because they were more flexible on content, this government has the trappings of moral and religious rigour," he said.

 

"So they might wear this more than the last government."

 

According to the poll, 45 per cent of Canadians believe it's right for the government to screen the content of films, because it involves taxpayers' money - and because government has the right to determine what's in the public interest.

 

As the poll was released, the Canadian independent film, Young People F*****g, opened in cinemas on the weekend. The film has become the poster child for the controversial bill that has many Canadian film and TV stars, including actress and director Sarah Polley, lobbying the government to stop the bill.

 

The reason, say opponents of C-10, such as Polley, actor-director Paul Gross and Oscar-winning director Ang Lee, is that Young People is the type of film that would have been denied funding.

 

Young People, a movie about four couples and a threesome trying to find satisfactory sex lives, has been viewed as pornographic by some religious groups, while others say it's just a bit of fun.

 

In any case, the film is not as raunchy as its title suggests. Although there's a lot of nudity, mostly it's just a series of sketches where the characters seek to balance their lives with love and sex. The film's director, Martin Gero, says it's a harmless comedy, but he agreed it may not have got the funding had it been judged by the title.

 

The poll found younger Canadians aged 18 to 34 were more likely to say the government is "wrong" to censor content by refusing tax credits, followed by Canadians age 35 to 54.

 

Those with post-secondary education and those who live in urban areas were also more likely to disagree with the bill, the poll suggests.

 

While the poll suggests a majority of Canadians disagree with the bill, the government argues the proposed change to the federal tax-credit system does not jeopardize the creative freedom of Canadian film and TV production.

 

Heritage Minister Josée Verner says the government is trying to make sure Canadian taxpayers' money won't fund extreme violence or pornography.

 

http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news/story.html?id=a7f81b30-f97e-4570-84d8-dff373f9f66e

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Les crédits d'impôt ne SONT PAS une subvention. C'est un levier financier pour aider les industries, et pas juste celle du cinéma.

 

Tu as trouvé que Young People Fucking était un film trash? Ou juges-tu le film sans l'avoir vu, comme le font les lobbyistes religieux de l'Ouest qui s'évertuent à le dénoncer et s'en servent pour vanter les mérites du bill C-10?

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j'ai dit "ou d'autres", j'ai pas vu young people fucking.

 

Mais j'ai vu en masse de films trasher recevoir des aides gouvernementales de tous sortes.

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La seule chose provocante de Young People fucking c'est le titre... c'est une comédie romantique à peine déjantée...

 

Je trouve inacceptable que l'état devienne la police des mœurs et bonnes conduites, c'est profondément choquant qu'un État qui ai été le fleuron d'un libéralisme au sens propre en soit réduit à des mesures néo-conservatrices de ce type.

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Elles ne sont pas mauvaises ses valeurs, et elles n'empêchent pas les réalisateurs de films de faire ce qu'ils veulent, y a pas de "board" de la censure au Canada.

 

Les réalisateurs ont juste à trouver leur argent ailleurs.

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C'est pas du policing, voyons donc. C'est juste pas de jeter de l'argent par les fenêtres.

 

Et les crédits d'impôt offert à Bombardier? À Morgan Stanley? Les emplois créés par le tournage des films sont en général très bien payés. Pour le gouvernement, ce n'est pas une subvention, mais un investissement pour faire rouler l'économie. C'est d'ailleurs avec de généreux crédts d'impôt que le Canada et les provinces attirent les tournages hollywoodiens, comme le font plusieurs États américains. Mais même si le bill C-10 passe la rampe, ces tournages étrangers ne seront pas soumis à cette loi et pourront continuer à bénéficier des crédits d'impôt, peu importe leur contenu. Alors je trouve naïf de penser que la loi n'est pas purement politique et idéologique.

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Elles ne sont pas mauvaises ses valeurs, et elles n'empêchent pas les réalisateurs de films de faire ce qu'ils veulent, y a pas de "board" de la censure au Canada.

 

Les réalisateurs ont juste à trouver leur argent ailleurs.

 

C'est ça. Éliminons toute trace de violence et de sexualité dans les films canadiens. Fuck Cronenberg et co. Soutenons juste des beaux petits films avec des valeurs familiales traditionnelles et religieuses.

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