Jump to content

Économie du Canada


Normand Hamel
 Share

Recommended Posts

Canada’s Rising Personal Tax Rates and Falling Tax Competitiveness, 2020

By Tegan Hill, Nathaniel Li, and Milagros Palacios

In December 2015, Canada’s new Liberal government introduced changes to Canada’s personal income tax system. Among the changes for the 2016 tax year, the federal government added a new income tax bracket, raising the top tax rate from 29 to 33 percent on incomes over $200,000. This increase in the federal tax rate is layered on top of numerous recent provincial increases. Starting with Nova Scotia in 2010, through 2019 at least one Canadian government has increased the top personal income tax rate in every year except 2011 and 2019. Over this period, seven out of 10 provincial governments increased tax rates on upper-income earners. As a result, the combined federal and provincial top personal income tax rate has increased in every province since 2009.

The largest tax hike has been in Alberta, where the com- bined top rate increased by 9 percentage points (or 23.1 percent), in part because the new rates were added to a relatively low initial rate. In Ontario, the combined top rate increased by 7.1 percentage points (or 15.3 per- cent); in Quebec it increased by 5.1 percentage points (or 10.6 percent).

These increases have important consequences for Canada’s economy. In particular, high and increasing marginal tax rates—that is, the tax rate on the next dollar earned—dis- courage people from engaging in productive economic ac- tivity, ultimately hindering economic growth and prosperity. This occurs because marginal tax rates reduce the reward of earning more income and, in the case of personal income taxes, more labour income. There is general agreement in the economic literature on this point; the debate is about the magnitude of the effect.

The federal and provincial increases to Canada’s marginal in- come tax rates from 2009 to 2019 have put the country at a greater competitive disadvantage for attracting and retain- ing skilled labour and, less directly, investment and entre- preneurs. Even before the changes, the country’s combined federal and provincial top marginal tax rates compared un- favourably to those in the United States and other industri- alized countries.

Out of 61 Canadian and US jurisdictions (including the prov- inces, states, and Washington, DC), Nova Scotia currently has the highest combined top statutory marginal rate (54.00 percent), followed by Ontario (53.53 percent), and Quebec (53.31 percent). Nine Canadian provinces occupy the list of 10 jurisdictions with the highest top combined marginal in- come tax rates and all provinces are in the top 13. There are a total of 48 US jurisdictions with combined top tax rates that are lower than all Canadian provinces.

The fact that Canada’s top tax rates are often applied to low- er levels of income than is the case in other countries further erodes our tax competitiveness. To adjust for differences in income thresholds, we compare the combined statuto- ry marginal tax rates at various income levels in Canadian dollars for each Canadian and US jurisdiction. At an income of CA$300,000, the highest threshold (with the slight excep- tion of Alberta) in which a Canadian combined top rate is applied, Canadians in every province face a higher marginal income tax rate than Americans in any US state. Results are the same at an income of CA$150,000 and Canada’s margin- al tax rates are also uncompetitive at incomes of CA$75,000 and CA$50,000.

At an income of CA$300,000, the highest threshold (with the slight exception of Alberta) in which a Canadian combined top rate is applied, Canadians in every province face a higher marginal income tax rate than Americans in any US state. Results are the same at an income of CA$150,000 and Canada’s marginal tax rates are also uncompetitive at incomes of CA$75,000 and CA$50,000.

Taken together, Canada’s personal income tax rates are decidedly uncompetitive compared to those in the United States. And, Canada also competes with other industrialized countries for highly skilled workers and investment. To mea- sure the competitiveness of Canada’s top tax rates, the study compares the combined top statutory marginal income tax rates with rates in 36 industrialized countries. In 2018 (latest year of available international data) Canada had the 7th highest combined top tax rate out of 36 countries. The fed- eral change to the top rate in 2016 has markedly worsened Canada’s competitive position. For instance, Canada had the 13th highest combined tax rate in 2014, before the changes in the federal top rate.

Canadian governments have put the country in this un- competitive position in part to raise more revenue as they grapple with persistent deficits and mounting debt. How- ever, the tax increases are unlikely to raise as much reve- nue as governments expect since taxpayers—particularly upper-income earners—tend to change their behaviour in response to higher tax rates in ways that reduce the amount of tax they might pay. Federal and provincial governments would do well to consider reversing the trend towards high- er marginal tax rates on upper-income earners, and lower personal income tax rates.

https://www.fraserinstitute.org/studies/canadas-rising-personal-tax-rates-and-falling-tax-competitiveness-2020

Figure 3.png

Figure 4.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 26 minutes, jesseps a dit :

That will not change anytime soon.

Well, I am afraid it will, and in the wrong direction. Except pour Québec, which has had a relatively small increase in tax burden in recent years, thanks to a tight management of our finances by various governments since 2009, along with a healthy and vigorous economy. Among the largest provinces BC and Québec seem to have a promising future while Alberta and Ontario will likely be struggling with the necessity to either further increase taxes or lower services.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a une heure, Normand Hamel a dit :

Well, I am afraid it will, and in the wrong direction. Except pour Québec, which has had a relatively small increase in tax burden in recent years, thanks to a tight management of our finances by various governments since 2009, along with a healthy and vigorous economy. Among the largest provinces BC and Québec seem to have a promising future while Alberta and Ontario will likely be struggling with the necessity to either further increase taxes or lower services.

Further...

1) The top marginal income tax rate is obviously a significant index, but it fails to fully capture a key difference that matters for all income tax payers, including those at the top.  This difference relates to the shape or the curve, because in the end, it is the total income tax paid that matters, not merely the amount you pay on the last dollar earned.  ( If necessary, I will create a table to illustrate the point).

2) What Ontario and Alberta have in common, compared to QC and BC, are much higher wages for public employees.  Not easy to scale down, perhaps only gradually.   Alberta, despite large budget deficits recently, still has a comparatively low accumulated debt; its main problem is that economic prospects have been greatly affected by the much lower oil price worlwide.  Not only have provincial revenues diminished, but future large capital investments are very much in doubt (my personal view ).  Ontario is different: economic prospects are not particularly bad, but the accumulated debt is already high and budget deficits are structural.

Now, with the incredible economic upheaval worldwide, all bets are off.  Having had a growing and diversified  economy with solid public finances is no guarantee of a bright future.  There are too many unknowns.  Current short-term gyrations do not provide, in my view,  credible glimpses into the world after.  Nevertheless, in that world, Québec keeps valuable advantages.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

À part les taux de taxes sur les revenues, il y a aussi les taxes de vente et sur quoi ils s'appliquent.

Ne pas oublier les taxes d'accises sur l'essence et alcool...

Sans compter la taxe "froid", pour ceux qui comme nous habitent presque le cercle polaire (lol)... bottes d'hivers, manteau d'hiver, pneus d'hiver, tempo, hiverner xyz et j'en passes.

 

 

glz8xyvs73f31.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 2 heures, Né entre les rapides a dit :

What Ontario and Alberta have in common, compared to QC and BC, are much higher wages for public employees.

Elles ont aussi en commun l'impossibilité politique d'augmenter encore davantage les taxes et les impôts.

Si l'Alberta a encore relativement peu de dettes celles-ci devraient cependant continuer d'augmenter dans les années à venir car les revenus de l'État resteront en  baisse sans doute pour de longues années encore car la demande de pétrole devrait rester anémique pendant encore assez longtemps à mon avis.

Pour ce qui est de l'Ontario son économie était encore jusqu'à récemment particulièrement résiliante, notamment grâce à une forte immigration. Mais sa dette continue d'augmenter année après année depuis 2009. La dette de l'Ontario pourrait même atteindre les 500 milliards d'ici la fin de l'année. Ce qui est beaucoup pour une province même lorsque les choses vont bien comme c'était le cas en Ontario depuis plusieurs années. Cependant la situation pourrait se détériorer avec la pandémie. Qui aurait pu prévoir la faillite d'Ontario Hydro en 1998? Pourtant elle n'existe plus depuis plus de 20 ans et l'Ontario a maintenant les tarifs d'électricité les plus élevés au Canada.

Pendant ce temps le Québec a toujours les tarifs d'électricité les plus bas en Amérique du Nord et ses tarifs de garderies font l'envie du monde entier. On a aussi les tarifs d'assurance automobile les plus bas au Canada. Cependant nos salaires sont encore relativement bas même si la tendance est à la hausse depuis quelques années. Et bien entendu nos taxes et impôts demeurent très élevés.

En résumé, le Québec ne peut pas augmenter ses impôts car ils sont déjà très élevés. L'Alberta pourrait devoir augmenter ses impôts, ou même ses taxes, mais ce serait très coûteux politiquement. Pour ce qui est de l'Ontario elle devra couper encore davantage dans ses dépenses au moment où elle aurait besoin de les augmenter pour compenser les investissements privés qui sont à la baisse.

À mon avis ce sont le Québec et la Colombie-Britannique qui sont les mieux placés pour faire face à la crise économique que nous traversons. La CB a très peu de dettes tandis que celles du Québec étaient à la baisse depuis quelques années déjà. C'est d'ailleurs pourquoi le gouvernement Legault veut profiter de la situation pour accroître ses investissements dans l'économie québécoise afin de compenser la baisse des investissements privés engendrée par la COVID-19.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a une heure, mtlurb a dit :

À part les taux de taxes sur les revenues, il y a aussi les taxes de vente et sur quoi ils s'appliquent.

Ne pas oublier les taxes d'accises sur l'essence et alcool...

Sans compter la taxe "froid", pour ceux qui comme nous habitent presque le cercle polaire (lol)... bottes d'hivers, manteau d'hiver, pneus d'hiver, tempo, hiverner xyz et j'en passes.

 

 

glz8xyvs73f31.png

Dans ce cas-là, il faut aussi considérer les bénéfices du même genre.  L'électricité est moins chère, les logements aussi.  Il y a moins de crimes, ça doit avoir un effet au niveau des assurances et autres coûts liés aux crimes.  Pas besoin de s'acheter d'armes.  Il y a aussi moins de poursuites judiciaires pour tout et pour rien ici, ça doit aussi faire une différence.  J'ai aussi l'impression qu'on a de meilleurs mécanismes de défense des consommateurs au Québec.  On a des tempêtes de neige, oui, mais pas d'ouragans, de tornades ou de tremblements de terre (du moins pas au même niveau qu'à bien des endroits).

Notons aussi que pour 3 points de pourcentage d'impôs plus que la Californie, et 5 points de taxe de vente de plus, on a un système de santé publique, une éducation publique de qualité très abordable de la maternelle jusqu'à l'université, un programme de garderies, un des meilleur réseau de TEC en Amérique du Nord à Montréal (nos routes font pitié, par exemple...(mais, d'un autre côté, il n'y a pas de péages)) et l'air est de bien meilleure qualité à Montréal que dans plusieurs villes américaines.

Imaginons maintenant combien plus nous aurions (ou combien moins nous payerions) si nos services publics étaient vraiment bien gérés.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il faut faire attention quand on compare les États-Unis avec le Canada... la situation est tellement différente. Oui, tu paies moins d'impôts aux USA, mais on te retire 300$ par paie pour ton compte épargne santé, et tu as un déductible de 3000$ si tu dois aller à l'hôpital, sans compter ce qu'on te retire en assurances.  Est-ce que c'est vraiment ça qu'on veut? 

Les États-Unis sont un joyau économique, mais ils ont des problèmes sociaux que personne ne voudrait avoir. 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Près d’un million d’emplois créés en juin au pays

PHOTO DAVID BOILY, ARCHIVES LA PRESSE

Le Québec a enregistré une baisse du taux de chômage de 3 points, pour s’établir à 10,7 %.

(Ottawa) L’économie canadienne a créé près d’un million d’emplois en juin et le chômage a reculé à 12,3 %, alors que le ralentissement de la progression de l’épidémie a permis de lever la plupart des restrictions, a indiqué vendredi Statistique Canada.

Publié le 10 juillet 2020 à 10h27

https://www.lapresse.ca/affaires/economie/2020-07-10/pres-d-un-million-d-emplois-crees-en-juin-au-pays.php

Agence France-Presse

La reprise économique a permis la création de 953 000 emplois (+5,8 %) le moins dernier, soit près du double des prévisions des analystes qui tablaient en moyenne sur 550 000 créations.

Ave les 290 000 de créations en mai, le marché du travail canadien a ainsi déjà récupéré environ 40 % des quelque 3 millions d’emplois perdus depuis le début de la pandémie en février.

Le taux de chômage a baissé de 1,4 point en juin, après avoir atteint le chiffre record de 13,7 % en mai, soit le taux le plus élevé depuis 1976, depuis que des données comparables sont publiées.

« Même s’il s’agit de la plus forte baisse mensuelle jamais enregistrée, le taux de chômage demeure beaucoup plus élevé qu’en février », où il plafonnait à 5,6 %, souligne Statistique Canada.

Les créations d’emploi en juin ont été réparties entre travail à temps plein (+488 000) et travail à temps partiel (+465 000).

Le nombre de Canadiens travaillant à domicile a par ailleurs diminué d’environ 400 000.

Après être demeuré stable en mai, le nombre de personnes mises à pied temporairement a reculé de 29,1 % en juin et ce chiffre « devrait diminuer », à mesure que les restrictions liées à la COVID-19 sont assouplies et que l’activité économique redémarre.  

Le Québec a enregistré une baisse du taux de chômage de 3 points, pour s’établir à 10,7 %.

En juin, toutes les provinces ont enregistré une hausse de l’emploi et une baisse des absences associées à la COVID-19.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

S&P maintient la cote AAA du Canada

PHOTO ADRIAN WYLD, THE CANADIAN PRESS

Le Canada peut compter sur des institutions solides, une politique monétaire crédible et une économie saine orientée vers l’exportation, soulignent les analystes de l’agence S&P Global Ratings.

S&P Global Ratings estime que le Canada a pris les bons moyens pour mitiger les effets de la pandémie sur son économie et maintient la cote triple A de sa dette à long terme, la meilleure de son classement.

Publié le 22 juillet 2020 à 19h00

https://www.lapresse.ca/affaires/economie/2020-07-22/s-p-maintient-la-cote-aaa-du-canada.php

Hélène Baril
La Presse

Contrairement à Fitch, l’agence de crédit qui avait baissé d’un cran la cote de crédit du Canada le mois dernier, S&P croit que l’explosion du déficit et de la dette sera temporaire et restera sous contrôle.

Le Canada peut compter sur des institutions solides, une politique monétaire crédible et une économie saine orientée vers l’exportation, soulignent les analystes de l’agence. Ils qualifient la réponse des autorités fiscales et monétaires à la pandémie de « forte et appropriée ».

« Bien que le déficit et la dette s’aggraveront en raison de l’ampleur de la réponse sans précédent du gouvernement, nous croyons que l’utilisation par le gouvernement de sa flexibilité politique aidera probablement l’économie et le marché du travail à se redresser », détaillent-ils.

La détérioration du bilan du Canada devrait être temporaire. Le déficit devrait être réduit à partir de 2021, et le ratio de la dette par rapport à la taille de l’économie devrait se stabiliser.

S&P est d’avis que le gouvernement canadien, même s’il est minoritaire, saura rallier les partis d’opposition derrière son plan de relance de l’économie. L’agence évoque les tensions régionales, notamment les frustrations des provinces pétrolières, mais elle estime que les gouvernements minoritaires canadiens ont toujours réussi à les gérer. La crise provoquée par la Politique nationale de l’énergie en 1980 et les référendums sur l’indépendance du Québec, en sont des exemples.

S&P s’attend à ce que l’économie canadienne recule de 5,9 % en 2020, avant un rebond de 5,4 % en 2021.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...
adblock_message_value
adblock_accept_btn_value