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[video=youtube;7chpllnU-To]

 

The Bank of Canada unveiled its new series of “secure” plastic bank notes Monday afternoon. The $100 bill will begin circulating this November followed by a $50 note in March.

 

Printed on a plastic polymer material, the new bills feature transparent windows with intricate holographic images.

 

By 2013, the $20, $10 and $5 bills will also be replaced.

 

Here's the theme and portrait on each of the new bills:

 

$100: Canadians have long been at the frontiers of medical research and as a result have helped to save millions of lives worldwide. Notable Canadian contributions include pioneering the use of insulin to treat diabetes, DNA and genetic research, the invention of the pacemaker, and the first hospital-to-hospital robot-assisted surgery. (Portrait: Sir Robert L. Borden, Prime Minister, 1911–20)

 

$50: CCGS Amundsen, Research Icebreaker: The vastness and splendour of Canada’s northern frontier have helped to shape our cultural identity. The icebreaker plays an important role in the North, keeping Canada’s historic passages open, undertaking marine search and rescue, supporting isolated communities, and participating in international environmental research. The CCGS Amundsen helps Canada—the nation with the world’s longest stretch of Arctic coastline—to remain at the leading edge of Arctic research, providing the world’s oceanographers, geologists and ecologists with unparalleled access to the North. (Portrait: William Lyon Mackenzie King, Prime Minister, 1921–30 and 1935–48)

 

$20: The Canadian National Vimy Memorial — evokes the contributions and sacrifices of Canadians in conflicts throughout our history. (Portrait: HM Queen Elizabeth II)

 

$10: The Canadian train — represents Canada’s great technical feat of linking its eastern and western frontiers by what was, at the time, the longest railway ever built. (Portrait: Sir John A. Macdonald)

 

$5: Canadarm2 and Dextre — symbolize Canada’s continuing contribution to the international space program through robotics innovation. (Portrait: Sir Wilfrid Laurier)

 

More to come.

 

Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/Bank+Canada+unveils+secure+plastic+bank+notes/4976595/story.html#ixzz1Pr2CMMca

Edited by jesseps
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Avec ces nouveaux billets, je me demande encore plus pourquoi les USA ont des billets aussi rudimentaires !?

S'en est presque à croire que les USA encouragent la contrefaçon.

 

I thought the U.S was working on polymer bills but I just checked, it doesn't seem like it. I know it is funny that their money is pretty much the most counterfeited money in the world and they aren't really doing much about it :/ It seems they really want their money to be worthless.

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I thought the U.S was working on polymer bills but I just checked, it doesn't seem like it. I know it is funny that their money is pretty much the most counterfeited money in the world and they aren't really doing much about it :/ It seems they really want their money to be worthless.

 

It isn't counterfeited, the US has already been pumping out so many that nobody else can compete :D

 

It reminds me of the fun story about the Somali shilling notes. After the 1991 collapse of the Barre regime, the production of notes by Somalia ceased and counterfeiting skyrocketed. Now those shilling notes are worth very little because of the high counterfeiting, but it is to the point where the "fiat money" is now having intrinsic value, as the value of a shilling note (I think 1000) is worth roughly the cost of "counterfeiting" one, so counterfeiting has become unpopular :D

 

There are a whole boatload of security features on the US bills especially the higher denominations. It seems they come out with a new, whiz-bang design with a zillion security features every 5 years or so. They just came out with a new series...

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Avec ces nouveaux billets, je me demande encore plus pourquoi les USA ont des billets aussi rudimentaires !?

S'en est presque à croire que les USA encouragent la contrefaçon.

 

Ils sont (trop) férocement attachés à des trucs incroyablement dépassés parfois. Les billets en papier, le système impérial, le Hummer, Barry Manilow et Wayne Newton ...... :silly:

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