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The WC has been going on for a while now and no thread?

 

:stirthepot:

 

I just watched USA beat Algeria 1-0.. dramatic win! Goal at 91st minute by Donovan! Crazy stuff!

 

Happy for USA who had a fair goal incorrectly disallowed in the previous game (which would have allowed them to advance)

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      http://cac.mcgill.ca/safdie/habitat/default.htm
    • By mtlurb
      Montreal police learned from previous school shootings
       
       
      By The Associated Press
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      While shots rang out at Ecole Polytechnique emergency personnel "had a perimeter outside and they waited. No one went inside," Delorme recalled last September.
       
      Another shooting in Montreal occurred in 1992, when a Concordia University professor killed four colleagues.
       
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      Copyright The Associated Press 2007. All Rights Reserved
      Copyright 2006 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
    • By ricasa25
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      [/img]
       
       
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      [/img]
       
       
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    • By mtlurb
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      Posted on Thursday, May 10, 2007 (EST)
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      The Montreal band "Arcade Fire" during a performance
      © AFP/GettyImages/File Kevin Winter


       
      PARIS (AFP) - Led by trailblazers Arcade Fire, guitar-wielding groups have been touring overseas, winning fans and have everyone wondering about the secret of the city’s sudden success.
       
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      The Montreal band "Arcade Fire" during a performance
      © AFP/GettyImages/File Kevin Winter


       
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    • By begratto
      World vibe at Montreal jazz fest
      David Rubien, Chronicle Staff Writer
       
      Thursday, June 21, 2007
       
       
      "Jazz is a tree that has many leaves," says André Ménard, artistic director of the Montreal Jazz Festival -- a terse and apt summation of not only jazz but also his festival and the city of Montreal itself.
       
      The festival -- beginning its 28th annual edition June 28 and running through July 8 -- is the biggest of its kind in the world, an event that features more than 350 free outdoor concerts and 150 paid indoor shows. It is expected to draw more than 200,000 attendees, yet it manages to feel intimate. It's hard to imagine how a music festival that traffics in such numbers could be as sophisticated, smooth running, user friendly -- and inexpensive -- as Montreal's, but it is.
       
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      With more than 50 performances a day, it's clearly too much to take in, so it's a good thing adventure beckons outside the Place des Arts from any direction you choose. Heading south toward the St. Lawrence River, you'll hit Old Montreal, where you can easily spend an afternoon investigating the cobblestone streets, some with buildings dating to the 17th and 18th centuries. Stop at any of the many bistros offering mussels and pomme frites, usually with a good selection of French and Belgian beers and, of course, wine.
       
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      Heading back south to the festival, consider having dinner at what many call the most authentic French bistro in the city, L'Express. There's nothing pretentious about this spot. It's all business, packed with locals who seem ecstatic to be there, digging into bowls of bouillabaisse or scarfing pate foie gras or bone marrow, and tossing back wine that practically dances in the glass.
       
      There's so much more to do: great museums, galleries, beautiful parks, a 20-mile underground city where people spend much of their time in the frigid winter, day trips to the Laurentian mountains.
       
      Once you've spent a day exploring the city, the music back at the festival -- be it danceable, cerebral or both -- offers a way to relax and synthesize your experiences, processing them through the sensual to the aesthetic to the spiritual and back. That's jazz, and that's Montreal.
       
       
       
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      If you go
      All locations are in Montreal. Prices are in Canadian dollars.
       
      Getting there
       
      From San Francisco, Air Canada flies nonstop to Montreal. A number of airlines offer one-stop connecting flights.
       
      Where to stay
       
      Hyatt Regency Montreal: Online rates for doubles from $244 (about $229 U.S.). 605 modern rooms and suites across from the Place des Arts. 1255 Jeanne-Mance. (514) 982-1234, montreal.hyatt.com.
       
      Hotel Place des Arts: Eight air-conditioned rooms, studios and suites in a renovated Victorian building downtown. $40-$80 ($37.55-$75.10 U.S.). 270 Rue Sherbrooke W. (514) 995-7515, http://www.hotelplacedesarts.com.
       
      Where to eat
       
      L'Express: Bustling traditional French bistro. Entrees $12-$22 ($11.27-$20.65 U.S.). 3927 Rue St.-Denis. (514) 845-5333.
       
      Wilensky's Light Lunch: Tiny shop serving classic deli fare 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Entrees less than $10 ($9.39 U.S.). 34 Fairmount St. W. (514) 271-0247.
       
      What to do
      Montreal Jazz Festival: June 28-July 8. Various venues across the city. $12.50-$87.50 ($11.73-$82.14 U.S.); many free performances. (888) 515-0515, http://www.montrealjazzfest.com.
       
      For more information
       
      Tourisme Montréal: (877) 266-5687, http://www.tourisme-montreal.org.
       
      E-mail David Rubien at [email protected]
       
      http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/06/21/DDG4MQI4M71.DTL
       
      This article appeared on page E - 3 of the San Francisco Chronicle
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