Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Climat: Québec et Toronto se liguent contre Ottawa

Le Québec et l'Ontario se liguent contre le gouvernement conservateur de Stephen Harper sur la question des changements climatiques.

 

bilde?Site=CP&Date=20080531&Category=CPACTUALITES&ArtNo=80531041&Ref=AR&Profile=6108&MaxW=500

Les premiers ministres du Québec et de l'Ontario, Jean Charest et Dalton McGuinty. (Photo PC)

 

Jocelyne Richer

 

Presse Canadienne

 

Québec

 

Selon ce qu'a appris La Presse Canadienne samedi, les deux provinces signeront un protocole d'entente, lundi, afin d'accroître leur collaboration pour la mise en place d'un système interprovincial de plafond et d'échange de crédits d'émissions de gaz à effet de serre (GES).

 

Le but avoué des deux gouvernements libéraux provinciaux sera d'unir leurs forces pour faire contrepoids à la politique fédérale en matière de changements climatiques, qui a pour effet «d'isoler le Canada sur la scène internationale», a indiqué une source gouvernementale au fait du dossier.

 

L'annonce sera faite lundi par les premiers ministres Jean Charest, pour le Québec, et Dalton McGuinty, pour l'Ontario, en marge du conseil des ministres conjoint qui se tient à Québec dimanche et lundi, au Château Frontenac.

 

C'est la première fois qu'une telle initiative - un conseil des ministres qui réunit deux provinces - a cours et elle vise à renforcer les liens entre Québec et Toronto, sur les plans économique, énergétique et environnemental.

 

En matière de changements climatiques, les premiers ministres Charest et McGuinty jugent les engagements pris par le gouvernement fédéral nettement insuffisants et ont décidé de prendre le taureau par les cornes.

 

Si les élus conservateurs à Ottawa «ne veulent pas nous organiser, on va s'organiser nous-mêmes», confie la source.

 

MM. Charest et McGuinty espèrent que le protocole d'entente signé lundi servira de base pour convaincre les autres provinces d'emboîter le pas.

 

Les deux provinces reprochent notamment à Ottawa d'avoir fixé, dans sa politique, des objectifs «d'intensité» de réduction des gaz à effet de serre, au lieu de seuils de réduction absolue de quantité.

 

De plus, le Québec et l'Ontario jugent beaucoup trop éloigné l'échéance fixée par Ottawa pour obtenir des résultats, soit 2025.

 

On reproche aussi à Ottawa d'avoir retenu 2006 comme année de référence pour mesurer les efforts accomplis, plutôt que 1990, comme le préconisait le protocole de Kyoto.

 

Or, on estime au Québec avoir fait beaucoup entre ces deux dates pour réduire les GES, dans le secteur des alumineries, par exemple, explique-t-on à Québec.

 

Les deux provinces veulent donc démontrer qu'elles s'alignent sur le protocole de Kyoto et les pays qui s'engagent dans cette voie, plutôt que sur le fédéral, pour ce qui est des changements climatiques.

 

L'alliance Québec-Ontario «viendra en quelque sorte faire pression sur le fédéral pour qu'on passe à un système qui va être compatible avec ce qui se fait ailleurs», particulièrement en Europe, a précisé la source.

 

http://www.cyberpresse.ca/article/20080531/CPACTUALITES/80531041/6108/CPENVIRONNEMENT

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ontario, Quebec go it alone on climate

 

0602charest364big.jpg

Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty, left, and Quebec Premier Jean Charest appear at a news conference in Quebec City on Sunday. Clement Allard/The Canadian Press

Enlarge Image

 

KAREN HOWLETT

 

From Monday's Globe and Mail

 

June 2, 2008 at 3:35 AM EDT

 

QUEBEC — The Ontario and Quebec governments plan to go it alone by signing an accord on fighting global warming at a historic joint cabinet meeting Monday that gives the clearest signal yet the country's two most populous provinces are turning their backs on Ottawa.

 

The meeting not only ushers in a new era of co-operation between the two provinces, it also signifies dramatic shifts within Confederation and cooling relations between Quebec and the Harper government. Quebec Premier Jean Charest chose the occasion of a special ceremony in Quebec City yesterday, when Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty presented him with a plaque to commemorate the city's 400th birthday, to deliver a pointed message to Prime Minister Stephen Harper: Ottawa's influence is waning and it is Quebec's relations with the rest of Canada that matter most.

 

“This meeting also illustrates something that's very important about our federation,” Mr. Charest said. “The relationship that we have is much stronger, much more rooted among our people, than the relationship that we may have from time to time, for example, with the federal government.”

 

Mr. Charest made the remarks on the eve of the signing of an accord to establish a market-based trading system to cut greenhouse-gas emissions – an initiative that will lay the foundation for a national cap-and-trade program and an alternative to the Harper government's blueprint on climate change.

 

Federal Environment Minister John Baird assailed the plan even before today's first joint cabinet meeting between the two provinces was set to begin at the landmark Château Frontenac Hotel in Quebec City.

 

“I think it's more about talk and political posturing than it is about cutting greenhouse gases,” he said on CTV's Question Period Sunday. “It's a little bit of smoke and mirrors.”

 

Mr. McGuinty and Mr. Charest will sign a memorandum of understanding Monday that would limit the amount of greenhouse gases individual polluters could emit. Companies that exceed their limits would pay a fee to those that come in under those limits – essentially trading cash for credits earned by their competitors.

 

The initiative illustrates just how serious the two premiers are about attempting to relegate the federal government to the sidelines.

 

Planning for the joint cabinet meeting began in November, when Mr. McGuinty and Mr. Charest met in Toronto, signalling the beginning of their warmer relations. Both premiers feel that Ottawa is not doing enough to help their ailing manufacturing economies. By presenting a united front on issues they have in common, they are sending a message to Ottawa that they are a formidable alliance. As Mr. Charest pointed out yesterday, their combined economies are the fourth-largest in North America.

 

Their cap-and-trade system trumps the Harper government's climate-change plan, one that has been criticized for not going far enough to combat global warming.

 

“I just want us to be ahead of this curve,” Mr. Charest told reporters. “I don't want us to be playing catch-up to a new American government in less than a year from now.”

 

Mr. McGuinty criticized the weakness of the federal government's climate-change plan, which lacks an emissions-trading system.

 

“The federal government suffers from a lack of ambition when we talk about putting in place environmental protections,” he said.

 

Ontario and Quebec, by contrast, are “absolutely determined to find a way to work together and to lay the foundation for a national cap-and-trade program that would benefit all Canadians,” he said.

 

Ontario and Quebec are not the first provinces to commit to a cap-and-trade system. British Columbia and Manitoba signed on last year to the Western Climate Initiative along with five U.S. states. The regional scheme aims to cut greenhouse-gas emissions by 15 per cent below 2005 by the year 2020.

 

Alberta Premier Ed Stelmach has opposed such a system, saying it would cost jobs all across Canada, because Alberta is the economic engine driving the country.

 

Mr. Baird slammed Ontario and Quebec for doing nothing to combat pollution by big industries over the past five years.

 

“The reality is that the federal numbers will be demonstrably higher than anything that Ontario or Quebec come up with,” he said.

 

Federal Liberal Leader Stéphane Dion welcomed the involvement of the two premiers in tackling climate change.

 

“I don't want to give marching orders to the premiers on what they should do,” he said yesterday. I think it is up to each premier to decide.”

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Quebec, Ontario sign historic climate pact

 

mcguinty364.jpg

 

 

KAREN HOWLETT

 

Globe and Mail Update

 

June 2, 2008 at 1:20 PM EDT

 

QUEBEC — The Ontario and Quebec governments have signed an accord on fighting global warming after a historic joint cabinet meeting Monday that gives the clearest signal yet the country's two most populous provinces are turning their backs on Ottawa.

 

The accord establishes a market-based trading system to cut greenhouse-gas emissions – an initiative that will lay the foundation for a national cap-and-trade program and an alternative to the Harper government's blueprint on climate change.

 

Premier Dalton McGuinty said he and Premier Jean Charest want the cap-and-trade program in place by 2010.

 

"We believe that working together on behalf of two thirds of Canadians, we can reach higher, we can go faster, and we can go further than the options that are present at this time," Mr. McGuinty said.

 

"Furthermore, we think we have a shared sense of responsibility to be a little bit more ambitious on behalf of the people that we are privileged to represent."

 

The meeting not only ushers in a new era of co-operation between the two provinces, it also signifies dramatic shifts within Confederation and cooling relations between Quebec and the Harper government.

 

Federal Environment Minister John Baird assailed the plan even before Monday's first joint cabinet meeting between the two provinces was set to begin at the landmark Château Frontenac Hotel in Quebec City.

 

“I think it's more about talk and political posturing than it is about cutting greenhouse gases,” he said on CTV's Question Period Sunday. “It's a little bit of smoke and mirrors.”

 

Mr. McGuinty and Mr. Charest signed a memorandum of understanding Monday that would limit the amount of greenhouse gases individual polluters could emit. Companies that exceed their limits would pay a fee to those that come in under those limits – essentially trading cash for credits earned by their competitors.

 

The initiative illustrates just how serious the two premiers are about attempting to relegate the federal government to the sidelines.

 

Mr. Charest said the provinces have also reached agreements on trade and the recognition of professional credentials.

 

Planning for the joint cabinet meeting began in November, when Mr. McGuinty and Mr. Charest met in Toronto, signalling the beginning of their warmer relations. Both premiers feel that Ottawa is not doing enough to help their ailing manufacturing economies. By presenting a united front on issues they have in common, they are sending a message to Ottawa that they are a formidable alliance. As Mr. Charest pointed out yesterday, their combined economies are the fourth-largest in North America.

 

Their cap-and-trade system trumps the Harper government's climate-change plan, one that has been criticized for not going far enough to combat global warming.

 

"We are very much open to expanding this and ideally, this would serve as the foundation for a national cap-and-trade program," Mr. McGuinty said.

 

"This is hardly an exclusive club that we are putting together here. I know that in the past, representatives of B.C. and Manitoba have expressed some interest in this, and Jean and I would want to work hard together with our colleagues to lay down the foundation."

 

With a report from Brodie Fenlon

 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080602.wcapandtrade0602/BNStory/National/home

Link to comment
Share on other sites

C'est drôle que l'Ontario et le Québec se mettent à se ressembler et s'unir de plus en plus...

 

En tout cas, c'est toujours une bonne chose que les VIP (Very Important Provinces) se liguent pour agir là où le fédéral ne fait pas grand-chose.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

L'Ontario et le Québec sont les deux provinces qui ont le profil économique et social le plus semblable, quand on regarde au dela de la question linguistique. Elles font face à plusieurs enjeux communs. Il est donc normal de les voir s'associer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Climat: l'alliance Québec-Ontario se heurte au diktat fédéral

 

Alec Castonguay , Robert Dutrisac

Édition du mardi 03 juin 2008

 

Mots clés : Stephen Harper, gaz à effet de serre (GES), alliance québec-ontario, Gouvernement, Québec (province), Canada (Pays)

 

Répliquant aux initiatives du Québec et de l'Ontario visant à instaurer un système de plafonnement et d'échange de gaz à effet de serre (GES), le premier ministre Stephen Harper a prévenu les deux provinces qu'elles n'avaient d'autres choix que de se plier au diktat du gouvernement fédéral en la matière.

 

«Je regarde avec intérêt la réunion entre les gouvernements du Québec et de l'Ontario, et je peux dire que les cibles nationales établies par ce gouvernement sont des cibles obligatoires et que les provinces ne peuvent pas éviter ces cibles», a lancé Stephen Harper lors de la période de questions à la Chambre des communes.

 

La hache de guerre environnementale déterrée par le Québec et l'Ontario a frappé Ottawa avec fracas hier. Visiblement, le premier ministre Harper et son ministre de l'Environnement, John Baird, n'ont pas digéré les attaques des deux plus importantes provinces sur le «manque d'ambition» d'Ottawa en matière de lutte contre les gaz à effet de serre.

 

Au terme d'un Conseil des ministres conjoint Québec-Ontario qui s'est tenu à Québec, les premiers ministres Jean Charest et Dalton McGuinty, ont dévoilé le protocole d'entente formel entre le Québec et l'Ontario qui se liguent pour définir «l'architecture» d'un marché climatique. Ce marché pour les crédits de carbone s'appuie sur un plafonnement des émissions de GES, ce que rejette le gouvernement conservateur qui préconise plutôt des cibles de réduction basées sur «l'intensité» des émissions. Or cette formule ne conduit pas à une réduction absolue des émissions de GES, déplorent le Québec et l'Ontario.

 

Jean Charest a contesté la prétention d'Ottawa qui croit pouvoir imposer ses cibles sans l'accord des provinces. «Nous sommes dans un système fédéral où il y a des compétences partagées, comme c'est le cas avec les émissions de SO2» qui causent les pluies acides et celles de GES, a-t-il fait valoir.

 

L'initiative du Québec et de l'Ontario est un premier pas vers l'établissement d'un marché climatique à l'échelle du Canada, a signalé Dalton McGuinty. «Nous pouvons aller plus vite et plus loin» que ce que propose le gouvernement Harper.

 

Jean Charest a accusé le gouvernement Harper de mettre sur pied un système incompatible avec le système qui a cours en Europe et avec celui qui se mettra en place aux États-Unis. «Peu importe qui sera le prochain président américain, il y aura un virage à 180 degrés», a prédit M. Charest. Les conservateurs de Stephen Harper sont «désynchronisés. Si on a le choix entre le VHS et la Bétamax, il me semble qu'on est mieux [d'aller] là où la technologie s'en va».

 

John Baird a ajouté à sa sortie des Communes que l'Ontario et le Québec «n'ont aucun plan» de réduction des gaz à effet de serre destiné aux grandes entreprises et que les deux provinces «ne font que parler». «Si les provinces veulent prendre des mesures supplémentaires, c'est tout à fait leur droit, mais je dois être très certain que nos cibles nationales seront respectées», a-t-il dit.

 

En réplique à Jean Charest, John Baird a soutenu qu'il n'y a aucun vide à combler en matière de leadership environnemental et que le Québec devrait se regarder avant de parler. «Il n'y a aucune industrie au Québec qui fait face à des réductions obligatoires de gaz à effet de serre, a-t-il dit. Je peux moi aussi aller dans un hôtel du centre-ville [faire un discours] et espérer que les industries vont faire ce que je demande pour réduire les gaz à effet de serre. Ce serait un jour magnifique, mais ce n'est pas la vraie vie.»

 

L'alliance du Québec et de l'Ontario sur le front des changements climatiques pourrait bientôt être rejointe par la Colombie-Britannique et le Manitoba, qui désirent eux aussi un marché d'échange des crédits de GES basé sur un plafond absolu des émissions, comme l'exige le protocole de Kyoto. Le gouvernement Harper se débattait hier pour ne pas être isolé avec son allié albertain dans sa volonté de mettre en place un mécanisme basé sur des cibles d'intensité.

 

«L'Alberta est la seule province, la seule juridiction en Amérique du Nord, qui a fait une réglementation, et on va avoir un accord avec elle, a dit John Baird. Mais elle doit suivre notre cible nationale. Si le Québec et l'Ontario veulent faire plus que nous, ils sont libres de le faire, mais la vraie réalité est que nos chiffres seront beaucoup plus forts que les chiffres [avancés par les provinces].»

 

Pour mettre en place une Bourse du carbone, il faut un cadre réglementaire. Le fédéral aura le sien en place en 2010, basé sur la réduction de l'intensité des émissions. Selon le gouvernement Harper, l'Ontario et le Québec sont en retard de trois ou quatre ans, puisque l'élaboration de leur cadre réglementaire -- qui impose des cibles à chaque industrie -- n'est pas en marche. Une Bourse du carbone basée sur l'intensité des réductions est toutefois incompatible avec les marchés internationaux qui se développent sur le modèle des réductions absolues, comme le Québec et l'Ontario veulent le faire.

 

Les partis d'opposition aux Communes, qui attaquent les plans verts du gouvernement Harper depuis 2006, n'ont pas raté pareille occasion hier. Jack Layton a affirmé que le ministre de l'Environnement fédéral «est un obstacle à la création d'un vrai système de plafond et d'échange du carbone dès maintenant au Canada».

 

Le Bloc québécois affirme pour sa part que le plan des conservateurs basé sur la réduction de l'intensité des GES est fait sur mesure pour les pétrolières et qu'il nuit au Québec et à l'Ontario, qui ont un important secteur manufacturier qui a fait des efforts dans le passé pour être plus efficace. «On ne peut pas s'attendre à ce que Harper et compagnie nous présentent un plan de développement durable et respectueux de l'environnement», a dit Gilles Duceppe.

 

TGV et marché commun

 

MM. Charest et McGuinty ont rendu publics divers protocoles d'entente, tout en soulignant les progrès accomplis par leur projet de partenariat économique pour le Canada central, ce que le premier ministre du Québec a qualifié de «marché commun».

 

De même, le Québec et l'Ontario collaboreront davantage sur le plan de l'énergie. Les deux gouvernements ont aussi signé une déclaration commune en faveur d'un partenariat économique entre le Canada et l'Europe.

 

Les deux premiers ministres ont réitéré leur volonté «ferme» de réaliser le projet d'un train à haute vitesse (TGV) reliant Québec et Toronto en passant par Montréal et Ottawa. «On a le choix: pendant les vingt prochaines années, on peut construire une autre autoroute 401 ou bien on peut investir dans un TGV», a résumé Dalton McGuinty.

 

http://www.ledevoir.com/2008/06/03/192491.html

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interprovincial cap-and-trade plan could be working by 2010

RHÉAL SÉGUIN AND KAREN HOWLETT AND BILL CURRY

 

From Tuesday's Globe and Mail

 

June 3, 2008 at 4:24 AM EDT

 

QUEBEC, OTTAWA — A cap-and-trade system aimed at fighting global warming could be up and running in Canada's two largest provinces as early as January, 2010, under an accord signed yesterday by the Ontario and Quebec governments.

 

The agreement calls on the two provinces to set up a joint system for trading greenhouse-gas emission credits.

 

A cap-and-trade system would limit the amount of greenhouse gases polluters can emit. Those that exceed the limit could buy unused emissions capacity from companies that come in under the cap. Similar systems in Europe and other parts of the world.

 

Ottawa has proposed a different, less rigorous system with less rigorous greenhouse-gas emission benchmarks. The federal plan is unlike any other, and Ontario and Quebec have rejected the federal plan in favour of the European model, which they predict the United States will soon introduce, meaning the federal government will have to do the same.

 

The Premiers contend that Ottawa is "out of step" with the rest of the world on climate change.

 

"By choosing to reduce 'intensity' levels rather than an absolute reduction of greenhouse gases, they [the federal Tories] are out of step. So if you have a choice between a VHS and a Betamax, it seems you go in the direction of where the technology is headed," Mr. Charest said.

 

Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty called the initiative the first step toward a national cap-and-trade system. "We are very much open to expanding this. And ideally, this would serve as the foundation for a national cap-and-trade program."

 

Opposition parties in Ottawa said the provincial action shows the weakness of the Conservative plan.

 

But federal Environment Minister John Baird called the Ontario-Quebec deal all talk and no substance. "It's a shell game," he said, pointing out that Ottawa is regulating industrial polluters.

 

NDP MP Nathan Cullen said Mr. Baird's response is "irresponsible."

 

"The provinces are attempting to fill the vacuum, the void that's been created by this federal government and this minister's response is ... to argue against them, thereby getting nothing accomplished for the environment or climate change," he said.

 

Mr. McGuinty and Mr. Charest began talking about working together on a climate-change plan a few weeks before all the premiers met in Vancouver in January. British Columbia's Gordon Campbell and Manitoba's Gary Doer jumped on board during that meeting, but the talks continued only between Ontario and Quebec.

 

Both premiers urged Ottawa to commence talks on a transatlantic trade agreement with Europe when it hosts a summit with European countries in Quebec City next October.

 

Other agreements signed yesterday include a commitment from Quebec to ensure Ontario a supply of hydroelectric power. Quebec is building a 1,200-megawatt interconnection power distribution line to Ontario.

 

The provinces also committed to pave the way for greater labour mobility and harmonization of regulations. They will also work on common programs for youth development and social services.

 

The two governments will meet again next year in Ontario.

 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080603.wcarbon03/BNStory/National/Quebec/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Other agreements signed yesterday include a commitment from Quebec to ensure Ontario a supply of hydroelectric power. Quebec is building a 1,200-megawatt interconnection power distribution line to Ontario.

 

Avons nous plus de détails par rapport à cette entente??

 

L'Ontario a soif pour de l'énergie. Il faudrait que le Québec en profite!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Avons mous plaus de détails par rapport à cette entente??

 

L'Ontario a soif pour de l'énergie. Il faudrait que le Québec en profite!

 

Interconnexion avec l`Ontario - En Bref

 

ontario_g_2008-04_01.jpg

 

À la suite d'une entente survenue entre Hydro-Québec TransÉnergie et Hydro One Networks, une nouvelle interconnexion d'une capacité de 1 250 MW sera construite entre le Québec et l'Ontario.

 

Ce projet d'interconnexion comprendra trois composantes principales :

 

* le poste de l'Outaouais à 315-230 kV ;

* la ligne à 230 kV de l'Outaouais-Ontario ;

* la ligne à 315 kV Chénier-Outaouais.

 

 

En accord avec la stratégie énergétique du Québec, les nouveaux équipements permettront d'effectuer des échanges d'énergie entre le Québec et l'Ontario. En plus de fournir à nos voisins une énergie propre et renouvelable, l’interconnexion servira à améliorer la fiabilité du réseau québécois grâce à la possibilité qu'aura Hydro-Québec d'importer de l'énergie de l'Ontario en cas de besoin.

 

Le nouveau poste de l'Outaouais actuellement en construction dans la municipalité de L'Ange-Gardien constitue le cœur du projet d'interconnexion. Ce poste de conversion, qui sera pleinement mis en service au printemps 2009, est le premier à relier la région de l'Outaouais à l'Ontario.

 

Hydro-Québec Équipement devra également achever certains travaux sur la ligne d'interconnexion à 230 kV de l'Outaouais-Ontario de façon à relier le poste de l'Outaouais au poste de Hawthorne, situé près d'Ottawa. Ces travaux seront terminés d'ici à l'automne 2008. Notons que c'est Hydro One Networks qui effectuera la construction de la ligne du côté ontarien.

 

Comme la capacité d'interconnexion serait limitée si l'on s'en tenait aux lignes de transport existantes, Hydro-Québec TransÉnergie étudie la possibilité de construire une ligne à 315 kV de façon à relier le poste Chénier, situé à Mirabel, au futur poste de l'Outaouais. Cette nouvelle ligne d'environ 115 km, la ligne Chénier-Outaouais, serait construite dans l'emprise existante de la ligne Chénier-Vignan afin de réduire les impacts environnementaux. Sa mise en service pourrait avoir lieu au printemps 2010.

 

Avec ces trois composantes en place, Hydro-Québec sera en mesure de doubler sa capacité d'exportation en Ontario. L'énergie excédentaire exportée pourra répondre aux besoins de plus de 400 000 résidences ontariennes.

 

Le coût total de l'interconnexion est évalué à 684 M$. Conformément à ses pratiques, l'entreprise accordera une attention particulière aux retombées économiques régionales.

 

http://www.hydroquebec.com/interconnexion/index.html

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

La nouvelle alliance

 

Manon Cornellier

Le Devoir

samedi 7 juin 2008

 

La rencontre au sommet des premiers ministres québécois et ontarien et de leur conseil des ministres respectif a provoqué des sentiments contradictoires d’un bout à l’autre du pays. Avant même l’accord conclu sur le projet de système d’échange de crédits de carbone, c’est la tenue même de cette réunion, généralement applaudie dans la presse ontarienne et des Maritimes, et ses conséquences éventuelles qui ont retenu l’attention.

 

Selon Chantal Hébert, du Toronto Star, la nouvelle alliance entre Jean Charest et Dalton McGuinty « est la manifestation la plus éloquente à ce jour d’une nouvelle ère d’activisme provincial où les premiers ministres provinciaux prennent l’initiative dans des dossiers de politique nationale ». Alors qu’on avait l’habitude de voir les provinces se rebiffer devant les ingérences d’Ottawa dans leurs propres affaires, voilà qu’on assiste à un renversement où les provinces se mêlent de commerce, de changements climatiques, de relations étrangères, sans égards, bien souvent, pour l’orientation adoptée par le gouvernement Harper.

 

James Travers, aussi du Star, pense que Harper ne doit pas être totalement mécontent de ces derniers développements. Il a beau avoir été embarrassé par la sortie des Charest et McGuinty sur l’environnement, il a vu dans cette rencontre une certaine concrétisation de sa vision de la fédération. « Harper a toujours sérieusement défendu un rôle plus circonscrit pour le gouvernement fédéral, et son plan fonctionne, écrit Travers. Par conséquent, en laissant Harper à l’écart, McGuinty et Charest mettent les conservateurs dans une position confortable. Parfois, une gifle au visage peut être l’équivalent d’une tape dans le dos. »

 

Barbara Yaffe, du Vancouver Sun, se demande cependant s’il est possible qu’un pays ait deux centres de gravité, celui formé du Québec et de l’Ontario et celui composé de l’Alberta et de la Colombie-Britannique. Elle affirme qu’ils sont destinés à prendre des directions opposées « car, lorsque les conditions économiques de l’un sont bonnes, le plus souvent celles de l’autre sont mauvaises. Deux blocs puissants, des intérêts divergents, un gouvernement fédéral, ce devrait être intéressant. »

L’Ouest aux aguets

 

La décision du Québec et de l’Ontario d’aller de l’avant avec un système d’échange de crédits de carbone est perçue par l’Ottawa Citizen, le Toronto Star, le Halifax Chronicle Herald et le Globe and Mail comme un geste nécessaire étant donné le manque de leadership du gouvernement fédéral dans le dossier des changements climatiques. Le Winnipeg Free Press déplore toutefois l’absence d’un plan cohérent à l’échelle canadienne. À son avis, le problème des changements climatiques ne peut être résolu sans une rencontre au sommet de tous les acteurs et l’adoption d’« une sérieuse stratégie nationale à long terme ».

 

Dans l’Ouest, on s’inquiète. Le Vancouver Sun trouve que l’initiative des deux provinces ne fait qu’embrouiller davantage le paysage et qu’elle est déjà compromise par « la confusion et l’esprit de clocher ». L’Edmonton Journal invite le premier ministre albertain Ed Stelmach à continuer de défendre « la santé du moteur énergétique de l’économie canadienne » mais à comprendre aussi qu’« au XXIe siècle, la menace ne vient peut-être pas tant d’un changement imposé par les politiciens de l’Est que par le risque d’être laissé en rade par eux et la communauté internationale », prévient le Journal.

 

Le Calgary Herald se réjouit quand des provinces trouvent des solutions qui servent leurs intérêts, mais il apprécie moins que le Canada central veuille amener « le reste du pays à agir de façon à servir les leurs ». Selon le Herald, « il est facile pour le Canada central de jouer les bien-pensants au sujet des émissions de carbone puisqu’un système d’échange basé sur des cibles exigeantes ferait de l’Alberta un acheteur des crédits de leurs manufacturiers ».

 

Le Leader-Post, de Regina, craint carrément que l’Ouest soit victime d’une politique similaire à l’éternellement honnie Politique énergétique nationale. Selon le quotidien, un système d’échange de crédits de carbone aurait le même effet car cela entraînerait, comme sous la PEN, un transfert de richesses de l’Ouest pour soutenir l’économie de l’Est.

 

Injection de bon sens

 

Soucieux de réduire les méfaits causés par les drogues injectables, Québec a indiqué cette semaine qu’il pourrait envisager la mise sur pied de sites d’injection supervisée pour les usagers de drogues dures, à l’image de celui qui existe à Vancouver, le seul en Amérique du Nord. Ce site fonctionne grâce à une exemption accordée par Ottawa en vertu de la Loi sur les stupéfiants. Un tribunal de la Colombie-Britannique a conclu la semaine dernière que le sort d’Insite était un enjeu de santé publique, donc de responsabilité provinciale, et que les dispositions de la loi fédérale étaient inconstitutionnelles puisque contraires au droit à la santé des personnes souffrant de dépendance. Le site de Vancouver, qui devait fermer à la fin de juin, pourra donc rester ouvert encore un moment, mais Ottawa a décidé d’en appeler du jugement.

 

Ceci fait dire à Barbara Yaffe, du Vancouver Sun, qu’en ne profitant pas de la porte de sortie offerte par le jugement, les conservateurs « apparaissent maintenant comme les prisonniers de leur idéologie de droite » et aveugles au consensus local en faveur d’Insite. Kerry Diotte, du Edmonton Sun, pense qu’il est temps que les conservateurs « descendent de leurs grands chevaux » et reconnaissent que la science leur donne tort en ce qui a trait aux avantages des sites d’injection supervisée de drogues injectables. Diotte trouve ironique d’entendre les « moralisateurs conservateurs » dire que les drogues sont mauvaises pour la santé alors que le fédéral continue de tirer plus de revenus de la vente de cigarettes que certaines compagnies de tabac.

 

 

Source

http://www.ledevoir.com/2008/06/07/193048.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...