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L'idée n'est pas de répartir le débat ici, juste de mettre en ligne ce qui s'écrit sur le Québec à l'étranger.

 

Free lunches, please

 

Protests against tuition fee increases could help an unpopular government

May 5th 2012 | OTTAWA | from the print edition

 

Sure beats studying

IN THE past year students protesting over the cost of university education in business-friendly Chile have captured the world’s attention. In recent months their counterparts in statist Quebec have taken up the cause. Since February about a third of the province’s 450,000 university students have boycotted classes to oppose the tuition-fee increases planned by Jean Charest, the province’s Liberal premier. Some have blocked roads and vandalised government buildings. On April 25th and 26th around 115 people were arrested, following evening protests that turned into window-smashing in central Montreal.

 

Quebeckers have long seen cheap university education as a birthright. The decision by the centrist Liberals to double fees in 1990 was one reason why they lost control of the province. Their successor was the separatist Parti Québécois (PQ), which responded to a student strike in 1996 by freezing tuition fees for 11 years.

 

But Mr Charest is now in a fiscal squeeze. He has promised to cut a C$3.8 billion ($3.8 billion) deficit to C$1.5 billion this year. Quebec spends 4.6% of its budget on universities, mainly because its fees are the lowest among Canadian provinces. In humanities and social sciences, which have the highest share of striking students, Quebec charges C$2,845 and C$2,629 a year, a bit over half the average in all other provinces. To help close the gap, Mr Charest proposed raising annual fees by a total of C$1,625 over the next five years.

 

When the protests began the government vowed not to negotiate. It soon backtracked, proposing making student loans easier to get, linking repayment to income after graduation, stretching the fee increase over seven years and offering an additional C$39m in bursaries. But the student groups insist on an absolute tuition freeze.

 

Their hard line may help Mr Charest at a tough time. He would love to call an election before an inquiry into corruption in Quebec’s construction industry, which may leave his party squirming, begins in June. But his government is unpopular: an April poll found that 73% of Quebeckers are unhappy with its performance.

 

The opposition PQ has allied itself with the protesters, even putting the students’ red-square logo on its website. That may prove unwise: a recent online poll found that 79% of Quebeckers oppose raising income taxes to pay for universities. If the Liberals can tie the PQ to the movement’s intransigence, Mr Charest might yet risk an early vote and hope to eke out a win.

 

http://www.economist.com/node/21554254

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    • By SupremeMTL
      Hello all!
      Im back with another poll, this time about potential new sports teams in Montreal. 
      A little backstory, I've often been in many discussions with my friends about which sports team Montreal should push for next and our discussions always come down to 3 main points supporting a team for each of the big three leagues in North America.
      1) Montreal should get an NBA team, look at the Raptors and their recent success, Montreal is an international city with many of its citizens immigrating from or coming to study here from African and Asian countries where basketball is popular (Angola, China, Taiwan, Philippines, Cameroon, Nigeria, Congo) for example. A basketball arena already exists in the Bell Center (1996) and the team could play there. Montreal's NBA basketball team would naturally rival the Raptors and would make for exciting match-ups. Link - https://www.cbc.ca/sports/basketball/nba/nba-montreal-1.4857187
      2) Montreal should get an MLB team, we used to have the Expos. Already there is talk about the Tampa Bay Rays splitting games between their home arena in Tampa Bay and playing in Montreal. Stephen Bronfman (son of former Expos owner Charles Bronfman) has already expressed interest in owning the Expos should they ever come back to Montreal. Arena talks are underway near the griffintown / peel basin area and would greatly aid Montreal in getting a team back. Link - https://montrealgazette.com/sports/todd-stephen-bronfman-embraces-plan-to-bring-baseball-back-to-montreal
      3) Montreal should get an NFL team, the NFL is looking to expand already to places like London or Mexico City. If the NFL realizes that those two cities are too logistically challenging and they wont pursue them, then the NFL could look at a closer to home option in Montreal as realistically it is the only viable city in Canada that could support an NFL team. The NFL can't expand to Toronto because the Buffalo Bills would veto it. They can't expand to Vancouver because the Seattle Seahawks would veto it. Toronto already holds the title as "Canada's NBA team", and maybe the NFL would like to try and have the Montreal NFL team marketed as "Canada's NFL team". Link - https://www.si.com/nfl/2019/06/07/expansion-cities-san-diego-portland-montreal-oklahoma-city-bismarck-anchorage
      I am curious to what you guys think is the best argument below. Please feel free to add anything that i may have forgotten. This discussion is purely hypothetical and aims at being a fun place to build on / argue against differentiating points.
      Thank you for reading! 
    • By Thevince333
      J'aime bien voir Montréal bien performer dans certains classements surtout quand on bat Toronto ! Hehe
      Voici le dernier classement des meilleurea villes universitaires selon QS. Montréal est #1 dans les Amériques et #6 au monde.
      Voici ce que dit QS sur notre belle ville:
      Montréal is multicultural, multilingual and is widely referred to as Canada’s “cultural capital”. It performs well across five of the six indicators assessed, ranking within the top 50 for all of them except affordability.
      Montréal is home to several of Canada's highest-ranking institutions, including McGill University (currently ranked 35th in the world and second in Canada) and the Université de Montréal (137th in the world, fifth in Canada). The city is also a regular contender in lists of the world’s best places to live – and it seems students agree.
      While it might no longer be number one overall in the ranking, Montréal is 12 places higher in the student rank indicator than fellow Canadian city, Toronto, and is celebrated by students for its arts and culture, as well as for its friendliness and diversity.
      None of this is likely to come as a surprise. As a French-speaking city in a largely English-speaking nation that has experienced mass immigration from across the world, Montréal is known for its multicultural makeup and inclusive ethos.
      It’s also renowned for its laidback yet lively lifestyle, attractive boulevards, thriving creative industries, café culture, and eclectic range of arts venues, live performances and nightlife.
      https://www.topuniversities.com/city-rankings/2019
    • By SupremeMTL
      Hello everyone, 
      I have posted a poll just to get the general sense on what fellow Montrealers think is the greatest issue plaguing the city that should be addressed in the coming decade. 
      I would like to know your opinions, and i think that this would be a fun hypothetical discussion as there are no guarantees the city will do anything to address any of the issues mentioned in the poll. 
      If i have missed any issues you felt were important or needed to be in the poll please feel free to talk about them below. 
      Enjoy!
    • By mtlurb
      Montreal | Cold? Mais oui, but the winter welcome is warm
       
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      Archive | Europe without the euro awaits visitors in historic Montreal
      MONTREAL, Quebec — Taxi drivers kept stopping to offer us rides, beckoning to the steamy warmth of their cabs. No wonder; it was 10 degrees below zero on a February night, and we were the only people on the city sidewalk. "Non, merci," I'd wave off the taxis, determined to get some fresh air after spending the day on stuffy planes en route to this French-speaking Canadian city.
       
      The air certainly was fresh — sparkling clear and frigid as my daughter and I trudged along, swaddled in all the clothes we'd packed. I looked like a walking sleeping bag in my old, very puffy down coat.
       
      On the narrow street, wrought-iron banisters and balconies of Victorian buildings were glazed in ice. Snow sparkled in pools of light cast from living rooms and old-fashioned street lamps.
       
      Another taxi stopped: "Vous êtes fous" — you're crazy — said the driver, as we smiled and walked on.
       
      Maybe it was nuts, but the intense cold of the starry night was exhilarating. And thankfully, it warmed up in the next few days to a relatively balmy 15 degrees.
       
       
      Ask Travel
       
      Seattle Times travel writer and editor Kristin Jackson answers your questions about Montreal and other Canadian destinations in a live Q&A at noon Tuesday on seattletimes.com.
       
       
      Off-season pleasures
       
      Winter visitors to Montreal, a city of 3.6 million that's the largest French-speaking city in the western world after Paris, do miss out on the bustling summer life of sidewalk cafes, music and heritage festivals, and the city's world-class film festival.
       
      Yet there are advantages to the off-season. It's much more peaceful, with none of the summertime hordes of tourists who cram the narrow, cobblestone streets of Vieux Montreal, the historic heart of the old city that was founded in 1642 by French settlers.
       
      Flights and hotels are much cheaper. I paid less than $100 a night for a somewhat ramshackle, but cozy, suite with a kitchenette at the small University Bed & Breakfast. Its location was unbeatable — a short walk to the heart of downtown or to the restaurants of the trendy Boulevard Saint-Laurent.
       
      And winter brings its own pleasures, including outdoor skating rinks in the heart of the city; sleigh rides and cross-country skiing in city parks; and an annual winter festival (La Fête des Neiges) with concerts and other cultural events plus snowy fun, including outdoor games of volleyball and soccer and dog-sled races. And there's indoor fun, from shopping and museums to music clubs and restaurants of every ethnicity.
       
      To warm up, we headed indoors to some of Montreal's excellent museums. The premier art museum, the Musée de Beaux-Arts (Museum of Fine Arts), was a stylish place to wander among paintings and sculpture, from European old masters, including Rembrandt, to Islamic art to moody 19th-century Canadian landscape painting.
       
      Day by day, Montrealers beat the cold in "Underground City" (called RÉSO in French), a 20-mile pedestrian network beneath the city center where it's always balmy. The brightly lit underground concourses are lined with hundreds of stores and eateries, and link the city's major sights, hotels, Metro and train stations.
       
      It felt like an endless shopping mall to me, and I soon coaxed my teen daughter away from the trendy shops to the streets above. When we got too chilled, we'd warm up at one of the many European-style bakeries, indulging in fruit tarts or handmade chocolates. I'd order in French; hearing my mangled grammar, the shopkeepers would immediately switch to English. While only about 18 percent of the city's residents are native English speakers, many Montrealers are bilingual.
       
      On the bus
       
      To see more of the city and stay warm, we hopped on a Gray Line sightseeing bus for a three-hour city tour, from the pastoral heights of Mont-Royal, a 343-hilly park that rises steeply above downtown, to the stately stone buildings of Vieux Montreal and the stadium of Olympic Park, where Montreal hosted the 1976 Summer Olympics.
       
      The bus driver cranked up the heat and his patter: "It's a nice shack, eh," he cackled as we passed the sprawling 19th-century mansions of Westmount, the traditional bastion of rich, native-English-speakers. Later, the bus lumbered past the modest row-houses of East Montreal, where exterior iron staircases, built outside to save space, spiral to the upper floors.
       
      The bus became so drowsily hot, it was a relief to get out at viewpoints and at some of Montreal's grand churches, evidence of the once-firm grip of the Catholic church on Montrealers and all of Quebec province. That changed with the "Quiet Revolution" of the 1960s as Quebec turned more affluent, secular and multicultural.
       
      The faithful (and tourists) still flock, however, to St. Joseph's Oratory, a massive hilltop church by Mont-Royal park. Started as a tiny shrine in 1904 by a devout monk, Brother Andre, it expanded through his relentless efforts into an imposing, ornate church with an almost 200-foot-tall dome. Outdoor stairways climb steeply to the church; pilgrims still struggle up them on their knees, imploring for the healing miracles for which Brother Andre was renowned.
       
      Always a fan of visiting churches, I led my daughter into Notre Dame basilica in Vieux Montreal, the historic heart of the city tucked between the broad (and icy) St. Lawrence River and the downtown highrises.
      We whispered as we entered the ornate Catholic church, with its soaring Gothic-style nave, stained-glass windows and a vaulted blue ceiling that shimmers with 24-karat gold stars.
       
      There was only a handful of tourists, dwarfed by the vastness of the church, which, while it looks almost medieval, was built in the 1820s. It was a place to sit quietly, to think of the religion and cultures intertwined with Montreal, where the Iroquoian natives roamed for thousands of years, where French explorers landed in the 1500s, followed by fur traders, settlers and eventually the British and now waves of immigrants from all over the world.
       
       



      Montreal
      Where to stay
      • Stay at a downtown hotel, where you can easily walk to major sites (even in winter, thanks to the "Underground City." Some top hotels and boutiques are on Rue Sherbrooke Ouest, including the landmark Ritz-Carlton Montreal. Other upscale lodgings include the Hotel Sofitel and InterContinental Hotel.
      • I stayed at the moderately priced University Bed & Breakfast (adjacent to the downtown McGill University, Montreal's premier English-language university). It won't suit everyone — furnishings are eclectic and services minimal — but for about $100 a night, I got a cozy suite in an old-fashioned, townhouse-style building, with a living room, bedroom and kitchenette (www.universitybedandbreakfast.ca or 514-842-6396).
       
       
      • Get hotel information and make reservations through the city's tourism office, www.tourisme-montreal.org/ or phone the Quebec Department of Tourism at 877-266-5687.
      Getting around
      You don't need a car in the city; its center is compact, and the downtown and adjacent Vieux Montreal are ideal to explore on foot. For outlying areas, the city has a good Metro system. Guided bus tours are offered through Gray Line Montreal (www.coachcanada.com/montrealsightseeing/), or take a ride in parks or Vieux Montreal on a "caleche," a horse drawn-carriage (or sometimes sleigh).
      Traveler's tip
      • You don't need to speak French to get by in Montreal; English is widely spoken (However, it's generally appreciated if visitors try to speak a bit of French.)
      • While winter can be the most economical and least crowded time in Montreal, late September/early October and May also can be good times to visit, with lower hotel rates and more moderate weather.
      More information
      • Montreal Tourism: www.tourisme-montreal.org/ or 877-266-5687.
       
      • La F&ering;te des Neiges (winter festival): www.fetedesneiges.com/en/
       
      In a Notre Dame side chapel, Catholic schoolchildren finished their prayers. They filed out into the street, bare-legged and laughing in their gray and navy uniforms, skipping along the snowy sidewalk.
      They didn't give Montreal's winter cold a second thought.
    • By mtlurb
      Outside the box in old Montreal
       
      By Patricia Harris, Globe Correspondent | May 27, 2007
       
       
      MONTREAL -- Once the weather warms there's hardly a better picnic spot than the riverside park of the Old Port. And there's hardly a better place to pick up your meal than Europea Espace Boutique , the Old Montreal gourmet shop opened by one of the city's top chefs, Jérôme Ferrer .
       
       
      No sub shop here, as the elegant minimalist decor and racks of museum-quality coffee sets and boutique condiments attest. Although Europea sits in the heart of the tourist district, you're likely to encounter bankers, lawyers, and government office workers coming in for the box lunches ( boîtes à lunch to the French-speakers). In case it rains, the shop even has a few tables and a bar with high stools for dining in.
       
       
      The box lunches feature a choice of sandwich (prosciutto and Benedictine blue cheese with grapes and figs, for example, or sliced lamb with onion confit and grilled vegetables on ciabatta ) or salad (marinated vegetables with smoked duck and shaved Parmesan, or tiny greens with gravlax , fresh dates, and slices of mango) and choice of soda, juice, or water.
       
       
      An exquisite little pastry is perhaps the clincher. There's something downright decadent about concluding a picnic with a lemon and chocolate cream tart or a miniature chocolate mousse cake. The chocolate indulgence needn't end with the meal. Europea also sells dessert-inspired body products, such as crème brûlée hand lotion, dark chocolate bath oil, chocolate orange perfume, and white chocolate massage oil. Sweets for the sweet, indeed.
       
       
      Europea Espace Boutique, 33 rue Notre-Dame Ouest. 514-844-1572. europea.ca. Box lunch $8.10.



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