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Found 13 results

  1. I just saw this story online, of all places it was on Global Toronto and Fox News Radio. No one is covering the story in Montreal. Police investigate death threats, racist Tweets of McGill student (Courtesy of Global Toronto) I do hope the student gets expelled and is never allowed to study at any university again. Plus what does he expect going to a conservative club meeting? It would be like me going to Nazi rally and dealing with all the anti-semitism, but I wouldn't be an idiot tweeting what he tweeted online.
  2. As you can see from the following pictures, this handsome 1950 building (mostly known for its Mourelatos) has cleaned graffitis, new doorway, kicked out the shady dance school. I would bet this will be student residences / apartments, but they might have to get it rezoned? July 22nd 2013: Summer 2012:
  3. tres tres triste. Je gage de voir 3 ou 4 personnes commencer a insulter Villeneuve Former Formula 1 champion Jacques Villeneuve said he left Quebec because of the province’s language laws, business climate and the general “morose ambiance.” In an exclusive interview with QMI Agency, Villeneuve, who works as an F1 analyst on French and Italian television, said he “no longer felt at home” in Quebec. He recently sold his luxurious home in one of Montreal’s wealthiest neighbourhoods and is now living in Andorra, a microstate that is known as a tax haven, located in the Pyreneese mountains between France and Spain. “My leaving had nothing to do with taxes,” Villeneuve said. Rather, he said he didn’t appreciate Quebec’s “evolution,” which he said reminded him of France. “Everything bad about France was transferred to Quebec,” he said. “The social ills, the student protests ... The climate is such that people hesitate before investing in Quebec.” He blamed government regulations for scaring off investors, and said he didn’t want his three children to live in the “morose ambiance” in Quebec that “blocks its future.” In particular, Villeneuve targeted the province’s language laws, which legislate the use of the French language. He said it’s up to parents to teach their children how to speak French. The former F-1 driver will be in Montreal in two weeks for the Canadian Grand Prix where he’ll likely draw criticism for his recent remarks on Quebec. Villeneuve also received the wrath from student movement leaders last spring when he invited striking students to “stop protesting and go back to school.”
  4. The Redpath mansion at 3457 du Musee was demolished March 2014. It will be replaced with student residences in August 2015. 23 appartments 89 bedrooms 1200$ / bedroom / month rooftop deck August 2015
  5. s McGill University becoming the Donald Trump of higher education? First the school purchased the Renaissance Hotel on Park Ave. in 2003 to turn it into a dormitory, and now it’s apparently in the market to buy the Four Points Sheraton on Sherbrooke St. W., two blocks east of the downtown campus. Science student Billi Wun, vice-president of the First Year Council, told the students’ society newspaper The McGill Tribune this week that FYC president Sean Husband confirmed the news. Husband, whom Wun described as the liaison with the First Year Office, informed the council there are negotiations between McGill and the hotel. Spokespeople for Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide Inc., parent company of the 196-room Four Points, didn’t return calls to headquarters in White Plains, N.Y. “McGill has a policy of not discussing real estate transactions in public,” university spokesman Doug Sweet said on Thursday. Maintaining that no-comment rule, the executive director of residences and student housing did acknowledge that McGill operates at a 97.5 per cent occupancy rate. “We’re generally full and over at the beginning of the year,” Michael Porritt said, referring to the approximately 2,800 mostly first-year students housed annually. Porritt said the former Renaissance Hotel that McGill transformed into a 700-bed dorm in the the fall of 2003 is regularly at 99 per cent occupancy. There is other off-campus housing at McGill-owned Selwyn Hall in St. Henri as well as property leased at the Presbyterian College on University St. and an apartment building on Ste. Catherine St. W. Jean Lortie, president of the Confédération des syndicats nationaux’s commercial wing that represents hotel workers, said he is skeptical about such a deal. A search by the union found no proof of a transaction or request with the city for a zoning change. Instead, he suggested it’s an employer pressure tactic to end a labour conflict at the Four Points – where about 90 workers have been on strike since last Aug. 25. Lortie recalled that when there was a walkout at the Hotel Omni Mont-Royal further west on Sherbrooke in 2005, “there were rumours it was being sold to McGill.” The university never disclosed what it paid for the Renaissance, but it did cash in a $150-million, 40-year bond for the acquisition. [email protected]
  6. GDS

    Tuition 2008

    2007/2008 2008/2009 Canada $4,558 $4,724 Newfoundland and Labrador $2,632 $2,632 Prince Edward Island $4,440 $4,530 Nova Scotia $6,110 $5,932 New Brunswick $5,590 $5,590 Quebec $2,056 $2,167 Ontario $5,388 $5,643 Manitoba $3,271 $3,276 Saskatchewan $5,015 $5,015 Alberta $5,122 $5,361 British Columbia $4,922 $5,040 Undergrad tuition rises to average of $4,724 a year: StatsCan CBC News Full-time Canadian undergraduate students paid an average of $4,724 in tuition for the 2008/2009 academic year, an increase of 3.6 per cent over the previous year, Statistics Canada said Thursday. The rise, which follows on the heels of a 2.8 per cent increase in the 2007/2008 academic year, was especially prominent in Quebec, Ontario, Alberta, British Columbia and Prince Edward Island. Fees held steady in Newfoundland and Labrador, New Brunswick, Manitoba and Saskatchewan, and dropped in Nova Scotia. Despite the drop in Nova Scotia — the result of the implementation of the Nova Scotia University Student Bursary Trust in March 2008 — students paid the highest fees anywhere in Canada: $5,932. Quebec ($2,167) and Newfoundland and Labrador ($2,632) had the lowest tuition fees. Statistics Canada analysts were at pains to point out that the average annual increase over the last decade has outpaced the consumer price index. The CPI is a way of measuring the cost of items purchased by a typical Canadian in any given month, and includes shelter, food, entertainment, fuel and transportation. In the last 10 years, tuition has increased annually an average of 4.4 per cent — it was $3,064 in 1998/1999. In contrast, the CPI rose at an annual average rate of 2.3 per cent. Meanwhile, tuition fees for full-time undergraduate international students increased 3.9 per cent on average to $14,495 compared to the previous year. Canadian graduate students paid 3.3 per cent more for tuition than a year earlier, with an average of $5,777 in fees this fall. Tuition fees don't include additional compulsory fees, such as those for athletics, student health services and student associations, which increased 3.3 per cent from a year earlier. On average, Canadian undergraduate students paid $695 in additional compulsory fees in 2008/2009, up from $673 a year earlier.
  7. On the job, on solid ground The road to finding full-time employment in Quebec has many twists and turns. It also has lots of rotten bridges and overpasses. And that's good news if you're in the construction and engineering business. JEFF HEINRICH, The Gazette Published: 6 hours ago Shoring up all those massive old structures of rusted steel and cracked concrete is keeping many qualified workers on the job this summer. In fact, 2008 is the costliest year ever for infrastructure renewal in the province. How costly? Just look out your car window. Ottawa and Quebec are spending $3.2 billion to fix bridges and overpasses and repair roads at 1,800 sites across Quebec, including several major projects around Montreal. What began with a tragedy - the September 2005 collapse of the de la Concorde Blvd. overpass in Laval, which killed five people - has turned into a massive, government-financed job boom. Motorists may curse, but the boom has been a godsend for those who, it might be said, need a break the most: new immigrants trying to snag a first job in their adopted land. Since January, The Gazette has been following the progress of six of them, all enrolled in an intensive civil-engineering diploma program of 17 students at CEGEP du Vieux Montréal, their costs covered by Emploi-Québec. They wrote their final exams in mid-July and started apprenticing at Montreal-area companies soon after. The unpaid "stages," as they're known in French, last four weeks. The students are keeping a daily log of the 120 hours they're on the job and will return to class at the end of the month to give a PowerPoint presentation summing up their experience. After that, by the end of September or early October, it'll be graduation time. And diploma in hand, the eager engineers will hit the job market, finally getting off government assistance and earning a decent salary. One of the most energetic of the bunch is Agaton Oba-Buya, a Congolese man who spent half his life in Russia before starting a new life here in the spring of 2006 with his Russian wife and their two children. These days the 44-year-old PhD in technical science - who also had an engineering company in his hometown, Brazzaville - wears the hard hat and workboots of Demix Construction, a Longueuil general contractor. He was hired as an apprentice at the firm's Laval office two weeks ago. For Oba-Buya, Quebec's infrastructure woes spell one word: Opportunity. "Le malheur des uns fait le bonheur des autres," he said with a grin this week, quoting Voltaire's famous maxim. It was Tuesday and Oba-Buya had just spent the morning observing repairs to the 55th Ave. overpass of Highway 520, in Dorval, on behalf of his employer, a unit of Ciment Saint-Laurent. There's plenty of good fortune to be made out of Quebec's antiquated infrastructure, and if Oba-Buya keeps up the good work - and the repair contracts keep coming, which no one doubts - there's a good chance he'll turn his apprenticeship into a full-time job. "There's been a great deal of demand for workers because of all these private-public partnerships, projects like Highway 25 (between Montreal and Laval) and Highway 30 (on the South Shore)," said his boss, Dominic Martel, who also took on three others from the CEGEP program this month. "Usually we make do with apprentices out of the university programs, but this summer that wasn't enough, so we jumped at the chance for more workers when the CEGEP called us," he said. "Agaton has an advantage. He has a driver's licence and a car, which means he can easily get to the sites we're working on," he added. "I'm very satisfied with him so far. He expresses himself well, knows the technical terms we use, speaks several languages. He's autonomous, this gentleman, and that's what we're looking for." Getting his foot in the door wasn't easy for Oba-Buya. He sent his CV to close to 80 companies before his apprenticeship supervisor at the college stepped in to help land him an interview at Demix. It was in the interview that he began to practise the fine art of being accommodating. "They told me what projects they're involved in, such as overpasses, aqueducts, asphalt, sewers and drainage, and they asked me which one I felt most qualified to work on. I had experience with dams in Russia, so maybe a drainage project would have been a good choice," recalled Oba-Buya. "But in the end, I just told them to put me wherever I could be useful to the company, and that's what they did." His first day, he got a 45-minute seminar on health-and-safety procedures - essential to the job. (Three years ago, Demix was fined for negligence by the CSST after one of its superintendents was struck by a dump truck and killed at a job along Highway 40 on the West Island. The site is not far from the Dorval site Oba-Buya visited this week.) After the safety course, the budding apprentice was given a mound of documentation to wade through: details of projects, client profiles, bids from subcontractors, cement specifications, ISO norms - "everything so he wouldn't be thrown into a work site and feel like a tourist," Martel said. But what struck Oba-Buya the most was how his boss made a point of introducing him to everyone in the building. To him, that meant he was welcome - something every immigrant dreams of but doesn't always get. "It impressed me a lot - the kindness, the smiles - from everyone, too. It made an important step - leaving my studies, starting a new phase - all that much easier." Then, at the end of the week, he was taken out into the field, to three sites, including the 55th Ave. site. The overpass is so decrepit, it is slated for demolition in 2010. In the meantime it needs to be properly repaired and supported so that traffic, as well as companies like Bell Canada and Vidéotron that have cables to tend to down there, can circulate safely. To that end, Demix and its subcontractors are installing 64 foundation pylons to prop up the overpass. Behind concrete barriers last Tuesday, the site appeared muddy and noisy, its workers' clothing smeared with dust and grime amid the din of generators and drilling machines. Later in the week, Oba-Buya had a choice of revisiting a project on Highway 25, dealing by phone and fax with an electrician subcontracted for a project on Highway 55, and learning billing techniques using Excel software - all tasks he looked forward to with optimism and good cheer. And why not? He's got a whole new life to look forward to. Fall is coming, a big season in Demix's business. The company's human-resources department will likely offer one-year contracts to some of its summer apprentices, Martel said - salaries for management jobs like the one Oba-Buya has his eye on being non-union and strictly negotiable. Now comes Step 2 in the art of being accommodating: Don't ask for too much. As a permanent resident to Canada, not yet a full citizen, Oba-Buya feels the humility of being a newcomer. From his Moscow days, he retains his Russian citizenship and passport (and speaks only Russian at home in Villeray), and that gives him pride. And he remembers being his own boss in Brazzaville, one more thing to be proud of. In this country, he's not holding out for a barrel of gold. He just hopes that come graduation, Demix will hire him as a technician in civil engineering, whatever the salary. "I'll take what they want to pay me," he said. "The money isn't important. The important thing is to get the work." [email protected] THE QUEBEC DREAM: SIX STORIES. Look for Part 4 of this occasional series at the end of August, when reporter Jeff Heinrich checks back in with the students when they return to class to make a presentation about their apprenticeship experience - the final step before graduation. - - - Where they are now Since July 28, the 17 students in the CEGEP du Vieux Montréal's civil-engineering diploma program have been working as apprentices in various sectors. An asterisk (*) appears in front of the names of the six being followed by The Gazette: Real estate and buildings Le Groupe GENINOV Inc., Montreal: *Mohammed Tazi Mezalek, *Marie-Juline Jean-Baptiste and one other student. Construction EBC Inc., Brossard: *Hocine Merzouk, *Lady Alexandra Vega Contreras. Civil engineering Demix Construction (Ciment St-Laurent Inc.), Laval and Longueuil: *Agaton Oba-Buya and three other students. Geotechnical / materials / environment Groupe Qualitas Inc., Montreal: *Ahmed Gherbi. ABS Environnement Inc., Anjou: one student. Labo SM Inc., Longueuil: one student. Solmatech Inc., Repentigny: two students. Industrial engineering GCM Consultants Inc., Anjou: one student. Municipal City of Verdun: one student. Electricity distribution networks Transelec Common Inc.: one student. CEGEP du Vieux Montréal
  8. L'idée n'est pas de répartir le débat ici, juste de mettre en ligne ce qui s'écrit sur le Québec à l'étranger. Free lunches, please Protests against tuition fee increases could help an unpopular government May 5th 2012 | OTTAWA | from the print edition Sure beats studying IN THE past year students protesting over the cost of university education in business-friendly Chile have captured the world’s attention. In recent months their counterparts in statist Quebec have taken up the cause. Since February about a third of the province’s 450,000 university students have boycotted classes to oppose the tuition-fee increases planned by Jean Charest, the province’s Liberal premier. Some have blocked roads and vandalised government buildings. On April 25th and 26th around 115 people were arrested, following evening protests that turned into window-smashing in central Montreal. Quebeckers have long seen cheap university education as a birthright. The decision by the centrist Liberals to double fees in 1990 was one reason why they lost control of the province. Their successor was the separatist Parti Québécois (PQ), which responded to a student strike in 1996 by freezing tuition fees for 11 years. But Mr Charest is now in a fiscal squeeze. He has promised to cut a C$3.8 billion ($3.8 billion) deficit to C$1.5 billion this year. Quebec spends 4.6% of its budget on universities, mainly because its fees are the lowest among Canadian provinces. In humanities and social sciences, which have the highest share of striking students, Quebec charges C$2,845 and C$2,629 a year, a bit over half the average in all other provinces. To help close the gap, Mr Charest proposed raising annual fees by a total of C$1,625 over the next five years. When the protests began the government vowed not to negotiate. It soon backtracked, proposing making student loans easier to get, linking repayment to income after graduation, stretching the fee increase over seven years and offering an additional C$39m in bursaries. But the student groups insist on an absolute tuition freeze. Their hard line may help Mr Charest at a tough time. He would love to call an election before an inquiry into corruption in Quebec’s construction industry, which may leave his party squirming, begins in June. But his government is unpopular: an April poll found that 73% of Quebeckers are unhappy with its performance. The opposition PQ has allied itself with the protesters, even putting the students’ red-square logo on its website. That may prove unwise: a recent online poll found that 79% of Quebeckers oppose raising income taxes to pay for universities. If the Liberals can tie the PQ to the movement’s intransigence, Mr Charest might yet risk an early vote and hope to eke out a win. http://www.economist.com/node/21554254
  9. CZWG's Wembley student housing passes planning consent kick starting regeneration A £25m student accommodation project for Victoria Hall Ltd which was initially refused planning permission has passed on appeal and will soon join the landscape near London's Wembley Stadium. “The proposed building is of an outstanding architectural and urban design quality,” said the inspector. “It would create an attractive landmark enhancing the Stadium environs as well as the Capital” continues the report which upheld the recent planning appeal and granted consent. 435 student rooms will be provided on a 0.32 hectare site at the edge of the regeneration area around the new Stadium, near the entrance to Wembley Park Station. The building is planned as three wings around a central tower which steps and spirals up to 20 storeys. The wings are differing heights responding to neighbouring lower and higher residential and commercial buildings and an adjacent amenity space. The facades of the two wings that face south are to be partly clad in photovoltaics, their dark colour contrasting with the silver grey of the other metal cladding panels. The windows which are set in a diagonal pattern across the facades are recessed in chamfered reveals to increase their visual scale and depth. Active frontages to the street include a spectacular double height central entrance, a launderette, management offices and extensive bicycle parking. There are two landscaped amenity areas, the one to the west is intended for gatherings, the other which adjoins and visually extends the neighbouring residents garden will be reserved for quieter uses. The scheme had the recommendation of Brent Council officers and the support of the GLA but was turned down by councillors. The inspectors report and consent is the result of the subsequent public inquiry (enclosed). Piers Gough of CZWG said, “We are very happy for our client who had backed good design over expediency to resolve the issues on this key site”. The building will be on site in late 2009 and completed by mid 2011, acting as one of the first properties to kickstart the regeneration. http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=11376
  10. McGill Residences expands with the purchase of third hotel Set to open fall 2011, Courtyard Marriott will be converted to student housing By Emilio Comay del Junco and Stephen Davis Published: Apr 28 McGill has bought the Courtyard Marriott at 410 Sherbrooke O. to convert into student housing for fall 2011. A member of the Board of Governors – the University’s highest governing body – as well as Doug Sweet, director of McGill’s Media Relations Office, confirmed the purchase. The Marriott will join converted hotels New Residence Hall and Carrefour Sherbrooke, opened fall 2009. The financial details of the transaction are currently unavailable. An official announcement from the University is rumored to be scheduled for tomorrow, when the hotel is also set to stop its current operations. http://mcgilldaily.com/articles/30548
  11. Repenser et redéfinir le logement social en centre-ville, concours étudiant / Rethinking and Redefining Social Housing in the City Centre, student competition Projects Mention d'honneur (Sébastien-Paul Desparois / Céline Mertenat / Simon Goulet / Benoit Muyldermans) site: Montréal