mont royal

Member
  • Content Count

    686
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

428 Excellent

1 Follower

About mont royal

  • Rank
    Senior Member

Personal Information

  • Biography
    semi-retired
  • Location
    montreal
  • Interests
    reading
  • Occupation
    consultant

Recent Profile Visitors

1,831 profile views
  1. Also, there is a theory that once an airport hits the 20 million mark, it achieves a sort of critical mass; that there is now sufficient traffic with enough connecting strength that growth becomes more self-generating and less dependent on marketing or promotional strategies.
  2. As an Anglo-Quebecois, I would argue that the massive departure of the Anglo business community was a prime factor in the emergence of The new entrepreneurial class here. As long as the Anglos ruled the roost, they oversaw a closed shop...they ensured that francophones were excluded from most senior corporate positions. The anglo departure, which included robbing Quebec of millions of dollars heading down the 401 in Brinks trucks, hurt Quebec big time for several years. But is also opened up space for the new innovative Franco entrepreneurial class and the emergence of Quebec Inc. Today we see the innovative genius emerging in Quebec,. For the Anglos who have stayed here, or even moved here, they have largely integrated into the new Quebec, learned the language, accepted their minority status, and work in harmony with their Franco colleagues. Of course, you would never know this by reading The Gazette ( or the Journal de Montreal for that matter) , but the progress described above, is only the beginning.
  3. Irrespective of one`s ideology, left, right or center, every citizen in a democracy has the choice to play a role in his or her governance. Most opt out of doing anything; for several possible reasons, including ignorance and plain disinterest. I include ignorance because for anybody who has actually lived in, or visited non-democratic states, it becomes hard not to be grateful for living in a democracy and, by extension, undertaking the minimum commitments of civic responsibility. A slim majority head to the ballot boxes every 4 years (much lower rates at the municipal level). Although that is the minimal commitment of any citizen, it is a vital one; I always vote even if it is only to destroy my ballot, since I am profoundly aware of how many people have given their lives so that I may vote. And then, there is someone like M. Fernandez. He is driven by a passionate commitment to a social vision. He clearly feels that he must contribute as meaningfully as he can as a citizen. Not too surprisingly perhaps, he opted to become a politician. He gives his all for several years and now...he resigns from being a politician (however, not from politics in my opinion.) He has simply decided that he can do more to achieve his social vison outside of the formal political system. This is not unusual; there are hundreds of thousands of activists around the world who have made the same choice. They prefer to attempt to influence form the outside rather than from the inside. They are not defined by ideology. The could easily decide to join the National Rifle Association as they might join METOO. Why work from the outside rather than the inside? Mainly because of the freedom from constant compromise. Politics is `the art of the possible`. That means finding a denominator that can move society in one direction without totally alienating those who are in disagreement with that position. It is evolutionary, painstaking and demands enormous patience, stamina, diplomacy and strategic adeptness. Outside of the system, one can participate fully and passionately in advocating for your preferred social vision. As an activist your views can be expressed without nuance. At the same time, if you really want to move the political system forward you have to adopt some of the tactical skills of the politician. If this system breaks down and if social activists have no role to play, then society risks moving towards authoritarianism of the left or right variety and the climate becomes more ripe for a revolutionary option. M. Fernandez will no doubt continue to be a social activist. That is his choice and it would appear to suit his personality. Good luck to him. My concern is that we are entering an era where compromise is disappearing and where absolutism is increasing...across the political spectrum. Partisanship is solidifying; extremism is mounting; and the issues are increasingly global in nature and beyond legitimate governance structures. While the one body responsible for global governance, the UN, claims that we are heading for catastrophic climatic change, its own member states squabble among themselves, do everything they can to weaken or bypass the UN, and cling desperately to an irrelevant past. So, I am not surprised at his choice. The city of Montreal, the government of Quebec or even the government of Canada are largely irrelevant institutions in the face of the global issues he is concerned about. But, he has more choices to make. As an activist now on the outside, does he put his efforts to influence action at the local level where he has visibility and access, or at the global level where the real decisions will be made? .
  4. You mean, I have been hanging on to my tuque all these days just for this!!! My fingers are aching ....for nothing?? What are they going to suggest we do if they are going to announce real news??? Barricade ourselves in our homes? Call the army? Start a run on the banks?
  5. Non-stop flights to La Tuque?
  6. “Nuff said” . Is that a promise?
  7. And that is precisely the limits of capitalism. There are many other stakeholders involved; management, employees, local service providers, community groups, etc. It is not only shareholders who count, many of whom are institutions with no interest in the broader implications of a change of ownership. Fortunately, we have a Premier with a personal emotional attachment which goes beyond quick financial gain, and there is a very good chance that ultimate control wil remain in Montreal..
  8. If so, they are applying the same solution...from the get-go. Is there a buried river on that site?
  9. My understanding was that Le-vieux was defined by the limits of the original walled city.
  10. 4600 miles , not k’s (admittedly this is road mileage)
  11. Bogotá is 7400 kilometres northwest of São Paulo, so I don’t see a huge overlap here.
  12. Didn’t AC announce that next summer flights to Rome would be upguaged to a daily 777?
  13. WestJet is the largest airline in London, and this summer will operate six flights per day from London, ON to three Canadian cities including Calgary, Toronto and Montreal. The airline will also operate 23 flights per day from Montreal including two times daily to Vancouver, three times daily to Calgary, daily to Edmonton and Winnipeg, 13 times daily to Toronto, twice daily to Halifax and daily to London, ON.
  14. Toronto has nightmarish traffic and its metro system is less efficient than Montreal`s. It has succeeded very well with its suburban train system; much more comprehensive than here in Montreal. All in al, it remains a rather boring centre town....but that probably has more to do with inherent culture than with urban planning. Importantly, Toronto is the capital of Ontario. All provincial jurisdiction decisions are influenced by the location of Queen`s Park. Here, we have a capital city which is imbued with a tense competitive complex , verging on distaste, towards Montreal. That doesn`t help our case when provincial funds are essential, such as in public transportation. At the federal level we are also up against the strong-arm tactics of Toronto, who see us as their main competition and who will use whatever influence they have to affect federal politics (see CBC coverage out of Toronto on SNC ..disguised as national news, but really driven by competitive Toronto antagonism towards us). Irrespective, we move forward with excitement, largely indifferent to the petty envy of others. We know how lucky we are to live in a city where quality of life remains the priority.