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Stubbornly high unemployment rates got you down? Not sold on the economic recovery? Look no further than America's polite neighbor to the north, where jobs numbers are surging and home prices have been rising steadily for nearly a year.

 

Last month, Canada, a nation with roughly one tenth of our population, created about 10,000 more new jobs than America.

 

Yes, Canada's economic recovery is outpacing our own. In terms of sheer job creation, June saw Canada create jobs at a pace that was five times the rate predicted by economists, Bloomberg News reports. Canada added 93,200 jobs in June, while U.S. private employers added just 83,000.

 

Thanks to strong hiring in the service sector, Canada's unemployment rate fell to 7.9 from 8.1 percent, while America's unemployment rate came in at 9.5 percent in June, falling only because of a large exodus of Americans looking for work. All told, the U.S. lost 125,000 jobs in June because of a wave of Census layoffs.

 

Real estate prices tell a similar story. After 10 straight monthly gains, Canadian home prices rose 0.3 percent in May, reports Bloomberg News. In the States, things are somewhat bleaker. Many areas showed small home price gains in May, , but in many other areas prices remain close to their April 2009 lows, according to the latest data from the widely-watched S&P/Case-Shiller index.

 

Canadian real estate broker Royal LePage predicts Canada's home prices could rise an average of 6.8 percent in 2010. Meanwhile, the IMF, though remaining relatively upbeat on the U.S. housing and job markets, warned that the foreclosure crisis could lead to a double-dip in home prices.

 

(Courtesy of Huffington Post)

 

Honestly some of the comments about the topic is beyond stupid.

 

Some people don't want to move to Canada seeing we are seen as a "socialist" country :rolleyes:

Edited by jesseps
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(Courtesy of Huffington Post)

 

Honestly some of the comments about the topic is behind stupid.

 

Some people don't want to move to Canada seeing we are seen as a "socialist" country :rolleyes:

 

Well, it's not paradise. The salaries are generally lower, taxes are about 50% of your income (factoring in sales, deductions etc.) and you don't get a tax break for owning a home. But if you're coming to Canada because those 3 things concern you, then you're not making a balanced decision and you're bound to be disappointed.

 

Oh and the people aren't really all that much nicer/polite either, the country just has stricter gun laws. :-)

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Our quality of life here is pretty damn good.

 

Take your average person living in Cleveland (or even a better-off city such as Houston) and compare to your average person living in Montreal. I've been to all three and i can tell you it's no contest!

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I wouldn't call Canada, especially under Prime Minister Harper, socialist by any means. He inherited a very liberal government (the liberal party isn't quite socialist, they support business and even the military to a certain extent). However, under the Tories we have been gradually moving toward the center. If the Tories get a majority we might even get to become a more conservative country like the US (although never to the same degree).

 

Obama, on the other hand, is bringing the US leftward, although they still sit on the right of the political spectrum.

 

However, I would consider moving to the US if

a) I got a decent job there

b) I can't take the climate here anymore

c) We do something stupid like abolish the monarchy (the "sacred cow" of many English Canadians) or move drastically to the left (say the NDP gets in and decides to disband the army, raise taxes and weaken the justice system)

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a) I got a decent job there

 

It would have to be more than a decent job for me to move, But I get your point. So job, not a moving reason

 

b) I can't take the climate here anymore

 

The climate is not really a problem for me. Being born here kinda make me used to it. I'm also not one to travel south either, I like Europe more. So that's not a moving argument

 

c) We do something stupid like abolish the monarchy (the "sacred cow" of many English Canadians) or move drastically to the left (say the NDP gets in and decides to disband the army, raise taxes and weaken the justice system)

 

Monarchy is that important to you ? What Have they done for us lately? as far as I care. But I respect the rights to your opinion about it. For me not a moving reason either.

 

So I guess i'm north of the border for a while then!

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Many people are chronically disgruntled. If any of them moved to Canada (or any other country), they would soon be complaining about things here.

 

I knew one American at McGill who upon hearing that there were public Catholic schools in Quebec (this was the 1970's) said "Isn't that unconstitutional?. Well, it is by the American constitution. She seemed surprised that the American constitution didn't apply to Canada!

Edited by TomOfBoston
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Many people are chronically disgruntled. If any of them moved to Canada (or any other country), they would soon be complaining about things here.

 

I knew one American at McGill who upon hearing that there were public Catholic schools in Quebec (this was the 1970's) said "Isn't that unconstitutional?. Well, it is by the American constitution. She seemed surprised that the American constitution didn't apply to Canada!

 

Yet the US pledge of allegiance has them saying "One nation under God" :rolleyes:

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Ugh. After a year in New Jersey, I'm planning on moving on back up to Montreal this winter to complete my studies. The very thought of having to deal with Immigration Quebec and Immigration Canada puts a knot in my stomach. I know dealing with US immigration must be infinitely worse, but I'll be damned if the Quebec/Canada process couldn't be streamlined at least a bit.

 

Upon graduation, I hope to remain in Quebec. Thing is, Immigration Quebec - despite offering some wonderful free French courses and other integration programs - doesn't do much of an outreach to those on student visas. You'd think after subsidizing my education and offering language immersion classes that they'd be interested in retaining my marketable skills.

 

It's wonderful that Quebec has bilateral immigration and (soon) labor-mobility arrangements with France; it's wonderful how Quebec (under René Lévesque, I believe) opened the door to immigrants from poorer francophone nations. I would just hope that Quebec extends similar courtesies to those who wish to integrate, work in French*, and otherwise make their life here.

 

I'd choose the US (read: the northeast) over the RoC any day... but Quebec is a different story... :quebec::highfive::quebec:

 

*I know my message is in English, but I'm still American, so I do what I want, because that is the American Way.:silly:

Edited by gars du new jersey
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I think I would've moved to the USA a few years ago, if it wasn't for me getting married and kids. My friend moved there for work and tried many cities, and his experience destroyed many misconceptions we used to have... he still prefers Montreal for its joie de vivre, but at 140k/y you get accustomed to their ways very fast ;)

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