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Earlier this month, NASA warned that as the Sun wakes up from its "deep slumber," a massive solar storm could wreak havoc on our electronics, from satellites to the electrical grid, causing damages up to 20 times the cost of Hurricane Katrina.

 

But the Sun isn't the only threat to our electronic lifeline. National Geographic explorers the risk and consequences of the "electronic Armageddon" that could be caused by an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) bomb.

 

An EMP bomb, National Geographic explains, is "a bomb that's designed to go above the atmosphere and release huge amounts of energy," some of which in the form of gamma rays. Such a weapon would cripple electronics, but not kill people.

 

"In less than a billionth of a second, the electrical intensity on Earth's surface would become so hot that microchips would fry, power lines would overload and the electric grid would collapse," says National Geographic, describing . "Everything with microelectronics in it would stop: your car, your computer, the subway. There would be no electricity."

 

Learn more about what would happen if an EMP bomb were ever detonated in the video below, then find out more about solar flares.

 

(Courtesy of Huffington Post)

Edited by jesseps
Changed the topic title, seeing the RBC and CIBC one was added to Current Events by accident.
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Its scary that we aren't ready for this kind of disaster.

 

It'll happen man. Probably within our lifetime.

Advancements in nanotech; reliance on technology...we will be f'd.

 

Imagine all the planes falling from the sky...

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It'll happen man. Probably within our lifetime.

Advancements in nanotech; reliance on technology...we will be f'd.

 

Imagine all the planes falling from the sky...

 

The states is lucky... they have 16 planes that are meant to withstand this type of devastation :eek:

 

One reason I posted this in the General Discussion part of this forum there was about a minute clip about Quebec's blackout back in the 80s do to a solar flare and what not. It took 92 seconds for Quebec to go dark.

 

This is one video everyone should watch and try and be ready for the end.

Edited by jesseps
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... and be ready for the end.

 

1 : j'ai changé le titre du fil pour toi :)

 

2 : "ready for the end". Ok, si on manque d'électricité un jour pendant 1 heure ou 2, oui, il va y avoir des morts (gens "branchés" dans les hôpitaux, les avions, etc.) Les véhicules déjà allumés par contre continueraient de rouler, mais ceux éteint ne pourraient plus s'allumer. Mais de là à dire que ça sera la fin du monde... L'homme moderne a vécu sans électricité pendant 97,7% du temps de son existence (metton de - 4000 à 1850) donc de là à parler de la fin du monde... Honnêtement, je vivrais très bien sans électricité a priori. Le problème, c'est plus ce qui va avec : frigidaire, congélateur, tout le monde de l'agriculture, etc.

 

S'agit de savoir combien de temps Hydro-Qc mettrait à remettre le réseau sur peid.

 

Tu as vu la Guerre des mondes avec Tom Cruise ? C'est à peut prêt ça qui se passe dans le film.

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1 : j'ai changé le titre du fil pour toi :)

 

2 : "ready for the end". Ok, si on manque d'électricité un jour pendant 1 heure ou 2, oui, il va y avoir des morts (gens "branchés" dans les hôpitaux, les avions, etc.) Les véhicules déjà allumés par contre continueraient de rouler, mais ceux éteint ne pourraient plus s'allumer. Mais de là à dire que ça sera la fin du monde... L'homme moderne a vécu sans électricité pendant 97,7% du temps de son existence (metton de - 4000 à 1850) donc de là à parler de la fin du monde... Honnêtement, je vivrais très bien sans électricité a priori. Le problème, c'est plus ce qui va avec : frigidaire, congélateur, tout le monde de l'agriculture, etc.

 

S'agit de savoir combien de temps Hydro-Qc mettrait à remettre le réseau sur peid.

 

Tu as vu la Guerre des mondes avec Tom Cruise ? C'est à peut prêt ça qui se passe dans le film.

 

Merci :) damn 10 chars.

 

Yup I did see War of The Worlds.

 

Interesting thing is... most of us don't know how to farm, if this does become a reality or even kill / properly skin an animal so that we could eat it. In the U.S, there is only 2% of the population feeding 98% of the population (i.e farming or working in food processing plants).

 

Thing is... if Hydro did get their systems back up everyone else wouldn't be able to get electricity seeing everything would be fried.

 

As long as Hydro gets the power online and we get water filtration plants back online within 3 days, we will be fine. No water and hell will break loose.

 

tin-foil-hat.jpg

 

LOL just a joke :P

Edited by jesseps
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2% feeding 98% is amazing, it's a great advancement of modern times.

 

Those 98% can focus on doing other things... for example there's less than 1% of people healing the 99% other. 1% policing the 99% and I can go on with these figures.

 

That 2% feeding 98% is NOT a bad thing.

 

only people I can see doing such idiocy as launching an EMP are extreme anarchist/ecologist that believe in this Gaia shit and want humans off the planet.

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