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A little out topic, but don't you feel Twitter makes all these big organizations look retarded??

 

they just realised that it's possible to update a webpage realtime?

 

Twitter is simply BlogSpot with less options. There's nothing great about it.

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      Kevin Mio, Montreal Gazette
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