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CSIS boss cites 'worrisome' homegrown terrorist trend

 

By Norma Greenaway, Canwest News Service

May 11, 2010

 

 

OTTAWA — The most worrisome terrorist trend in Canada is the increase in second- and third-generation Canadians who have become so "appallingly disenchanted" with life here they are contemplating or engaging in violence at home or abroad, the country's top spy says.

 

Richard Fadden, director of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, highlighted the agency's concerns about the radicalization of such domestic groups Tuesday during an appearance before a parliamentary committee.

 

"These are people who have become appallingly disenchanted with the way we want to structure our society," Fadden said. "They reject the rule of law. They want to impose Shariah (Islamic) law. They want to do a whole variety of things."

 

Fadden told the public safety committee such groups of unhappy offspring of immigrants can be also be found in the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia.

 

Fadden cited the Toronto 18, a terrorist cell that planned to blow up CSIS offices in Toronto, the Toronto Stock Exchange and a military base, as the "public" example of what he is talking about.

 

Such recruits to terrorism are relatively integrated into Canada — economically and socially — but for whatever reason, they develop connections to their former homeland and reject the essence of Canadian values, he said.

 

"This is the most worrisome part, I think, of our work today," Fadden testified.

 

Fadden, who was appointed CSIS director almost a year ago, was briefing the committee about the agency's role in intelligence gathering at home and abroad.

 

He said the agency is tracking more than 200 individuals in Canada with possible links to as many as 50 terrorist groups.

 

Speaking later to reporters, he said a number of people — approximately two dozen or more — have left Canada to engage in "violent jihad" and most have ended up heading overseas to get trained in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen or Somalia.

 

"I'm not suggesting they are Osama bin Laden, but they have acquired positions of influence and leadership," he said.

 

Until recently, they wanted to do war elsewhere, Fadden said, but the trend now seems to involve more returning to their adopted countries to carry out their jihad.

 

"These are the ones we're worried about the most," he said.

© Copyright © Canwest News Service

 

Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/CSIS+boss+cites+worrisome+terrorist+trend/3015056/story.html#ixzz0ngxLANsG

 

Quite alarming news. All I can say is that their (and their family's) citizenship should be withdrawn immediately, and they should be given trials as soon as possible. If they are deemed to be a threat to society, then we send 'em to Gitmo. If they are just radical Muslims (but non-violent), deport them back to wherever it is they came from.

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Definitely worrisome...I think it's time to start accepting immigrants only from 'low-risk' countries i.e. countries that do not have a history of breading Islamic terrorism. In my opinion, countries like Somalia, Pakistan and Yemen are definitely NOT low-risk countries and immigration from these places should be severely curbed.

 

As for the homegrown terrorists born and raised here in Canada...send them to Gitmo! If they don't like it here in Canada they can get the hell out.

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As for the homegrown terrorists born and raised here in Canada...send them to Gitmo! If they don't like it here in Canada they can get the hell out.

 

I think many people would agree with you on that one. Not sure what the Liberals / NPD would have to say about that though. Oh let me guess, your infringing on their rights to express themselves LOL

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I think many people would agree with you on that one. Not sure what the Liberals / NPD would have to say about that though. Oh let me guess, your infringing on their rights to express themselves LOL

 

Yeah...maybe it's time to start voting for that other Federal political party which traditionally treats these menaces to society a little less kinder!

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Yeah...maybe it's time to start voting for that other Federal political party which traditionally treats these menaces to society a little less kinder!

 

I agree. Although that party is a tough sell here in the most liberal city in all of North America.

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Voyons voir. la plus grosse attaque terroriste a être jamais survenue au Québec a été faite par des québécois pure laine.

 

Personnellement je ne ressens aucune menace terroriste au Québec ou à Montréal.

Il n'y a jamais eu de menace, d'attentats avortés ou de groupes extrémistes démantelés.

 

Est-ce une conséquence du 'most libéral city in north ameriqua "?

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Voyons voir. la plus grosse attaque terroriste a être jamais survenue au Québec a été faite par des québécois pure laine.

 

Personnellement je ne ressens aucune menace terroriste au Québec ou à Montréal.

Il n'y a jamais eu de menace, d'attentats avortés ou de groupes extrémistes démantelés.

 

Est-ce une conséquence du 'most libéral city in north ameriqua "?

Lots of very well known examples.

 

Samir Mohamed had planned a huge bomb attack at two locations. The first was the busy Montreal intersection of Laurier and Park Avenues. The second was in Outremont. The reason was primarily because both had large numbers of Jewish people "walking about with long curly sideburns".

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2001/11/29/samirmohamed011129.html

 

Then there is the case of Ahmad Ressam, aka the Millenium Bomber, a former Montrealer who plotted to bomb Los Angeles International Aiport. http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/news/nation-world/terroristwithin/chapter7.html

 

The mosque where they were recruited to Al-Qaeda, in Parc Extension is still there.

The Assuna Annabawiyah mosque in Montreal sold tapes urging young men to join jihad.

 

Similarly, remember the "Toronto 18"? We all are aware that Toronto is quite liberal too. Pretty long article about them on wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006_Toronto_terrorism_case

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Selon moi, la plus grosse menace n'est pas le terrorisme tel qu'on veut le faire voir.

 

La plus grosse menace, ça va être les irrégularités qui vont entourer tous les contrats de sécurité que le gouvernement va accorder pour nous 'protéger'.

 

 

Le terrorisme économique et financier est bien plus dangereux.

Les terroristes économiques sont en liberté et dangereux. Ils sont concentrés dans les régions moins libérales, comme les grands centres financiers.

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