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Et je déteste encore plus le Palais de justice.

 

 

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L'édifice a été démoli pour faire place au nouveau palais de justice de Montréal.

 

Cette entreprise fut fondée le 24 juillet 1880. Vers 1914, c'était une des plus grandes banques de la ville avec ses fonds de réserve de 2,4 millions de dollars et 54 millions en avoirs et garanties. Ce fut une des premières institutions à être dédiée à ce genre de prêts.

 

 

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Source : guil3433 sur flickr

1911-2008

 

The Credit foncier franco-canadien building was built between 1907 and 1908. The fondation was in Stanstead granite and the stone was from Indiana. Even if this building was describe like one of the most beautiful of the city in the newspaper of 1908, it was torn down to make way to the new courthouse

pdj.JPG

Edited by monctezuma
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