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Ford scored a big deal this week for its new Transit Connect when Canada Post chose the compact commercial van to replace its current fleet of mail carriers. The Canadian post office went through a competitive bidding process to select a new vehicle that included total lifecycle costs, which favored the relatively fuel efficient Transit Connect that's rated 22 miles per gallon in the city and 25 mpg on the highway by the EPA. One of the key selling points of the Transit Connect is its fuel efficiency advantage over full-size vans.

 

Canada Post will buy 1,175 Transit Connects this year as part of its fleet modernization effort, which makes it the largest single order yet for the Transit Connect in Canada. Canada Post currently uses the same small box vans as the U.S. Postal Service.

 

(Courtesy of Autoblog)

 

transit-connect--13-630.jpg

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