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Solar shingles from Dow Chemical make Top 10 tech list

By Jeff Kart | The Bay City Times

October 12, 2009, 2:44PM

 

The Saginaw News

 

dowsolshingptjpg-acd410744f583957_large.jpg

 

A concept illustration of the Dow Chemical solar shingle.

A clean tech blog called CleanTechnica has a post up on the "Top 10 Solar Technologies to Watch Out For."

 

Coming in at No. 3:

 

"Solar Roof Shingles, Printable and Paintable Solar Panels ... Solar shingles, by Dow Chemical, should be available in limited supply by mid 2010 and then readily available by 2011, says the company."

 

Dow officials showed off the company's solar shingles to Gov. Jennifer Granholm in Midland earlier this month.

 

The company launched a $53.5 million solar shingle initiative in 2008, with help from a $20 million U.S. Department of Energy grant.

 

 

http://www.mlive.com/mudpuppy/index.ssf/2009/10/solar_shingles_from_dow_chemic.html

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Le seul problème que je vois avec ça, autre que le coût, c'est le nettoyage de ce toit, et son accès difficile... s'il n'est pas néttoyé fréquemment, sa production solaire est grandement réduite.

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:thumbsup: Très intéressant comme nouveau produit, maintenant reste à voir sa durée pour pouvoir justifier son prix fort probablement assez élevé. Comme toutes les inventions qui arrivent sur le marché, les premières générations éprouvent des difficultés qui sont peu à peu corrigées en améliorant leur caractéristiques d'efficacité et de durabilité.

 

Quant à son entretien et son nettoyage, on pourrait imaginer, notamment, une sorte d'échafaudage, rabattant ou non, qui pourrait être un élément architectural du bâtiment comme on en voit au faîte de certains immeubles. De toute façon tout est une question d'imagination créative et rares sont les problèmes qui ne trouvent pas une solution appropriée.

 

Personnellement je trouve que c'est un concept très original, en accord avec l'esprit écologique et les énergies vertes, qui pourraient devenir très populaire si son rapport qualité-prix devient avantageux.

 

Le génie inventif de l'homme est extraordinaire et permet d'être optimiste, dommage par contre qu'il ne fasse pas autant d'effort quand il s'agit de justice social ou de paix mondiale. :(

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