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Le 2019-05-30 à 20:03, Archi Mtl a dit :

Vu au salon Montreal du futur aujourd’hui  et qui concerne  la rénovation du 615 Boul René-Lévesque Ouest.

 

 

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Sans vouloir faire diversion, y a-t-il dans ce salon des nouveautés ou des scoops qui ont échappé à MtlUrb?

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    • By mtlurb
      Bonjour à tous et bienvenue dans cette nouvelle section du forum!
       
      Une section qui vous est entièrement destiné. En effet, vous pouvez nous montrer ici VOS propres projets pour la grande ville de Montréal.
      Comment voyez-vous le Montréal du futur? Quels projets voudriez-vous qu’il y ait?
      Simplement quelques petites restrictions (plus «recommandations» que «restrictions», pour que la section soit tout simplement plus amusante à regarder;) ) :
       
      1- Les projets devront être accompagné d'un appui visuelle
       
      Tout simplement que ce soit plus agréable. Un projet avec un rendu est toujours plus attirant à la critique.
      Exemple: Prenez comme exemple une des propositions de tour pour le Silo no5, même si elle aurait 50 étages, personnes n'en parle vraiment, parce que nous ne savons pas de quoi elle aurait l'air.
      Autre exemple : La tour d'Aluminium, dont tout le monde connaissait comme n'étant qu'une vision, mais qui a tout de même réussi à remplir 4 pages de son fil en deux jours! Si j'avais seulement parlé d'une vision de tour de 240 mètres sans rendus, personnes n'aurait répondu à mon fil!
       
       
      2- Les projets doivent venir de vous
       
      Simplement pour ne pas se retrouver avec des projets annulés. Ce fil n’est pas un fil nostalgique de projet abandonné.
      Aussi, simplement pas prendre de projets existant ailleurs et simplement le mettre, juste pour que Montréal reste la ville unique qu’elle est.
       
       
      Instrument conseillé pour l’appui visuel :
       
      Google sketchup
      Le logiciel est juste…INCROYABLE!
      Il est gratuit, complet (pour les débutant) et surtout…facile à utilisé.
      Je l’ai téléchargé pendant le temps des fêtes et j’ai déjà créé quelques petites choses pour ce fil!
      Vous pouvez le télécharger ici : https://www.sketchup.com/fr
       
       
      Logiciels Adobe
      (Photoshop, illustrator, etc.)
      Quand on les connaît bien, c’est quand même assez facile de travailler avec eux.
       
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
       
      Maintenant, à vous de créer vos propres projets! Comment voulez vous que Montréal ressemble?
      P.S. Ce fil est pour les commentaires, les annonces, etc.
    • By IluvMTL
      http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=6897,68149721&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL
      Chantiers de construction en cours
      Le bulletin Chantiers de construction en cours présente une liste les chantiers de construction de 5 millions $ et plus en cours sur le territoire de l’agglomération de Montréal. Celle-ci comprend une courte description du projet, son emplacement, le propriétaire, la valeur, les dates de début et de fin de la construction, ainsi que le type de construction.
      Cette compilation spéciale est effectuée par Montréal en statistiques pour la ville de Montréal et ses arrondissements, ainsi que pour les villes liées, à partir de relevés émis par la Commission de la construction du Québec. Sa publication est donc tributaire des relevés publiés par cet organisme.
      sent via Tapatalk
    • By Mondo_Grosso
      I know that many of you are against Montreal having it's own version of Time Square, but the point of this post is not to debate that. Rather, it's to look at potential locations if we had to chose one.
      Based on examples like Time Square in New York, Shibuya District in Tokyo,  Piccadilly Circus in London, Dundas Square in Toronto, I defined my own criteria as:
      Must be by an open area Must be close to commercial sector Must be accessible by metro At that, I have come up with Square Concordia, this is the area today:

      Here is why I think that this is the ideal area:
      There are 3 large blind walls for the screens High density of 24/hour restaurants and bars High levels of foot traffic at all times Proximity to various festivals There are already renovated squares on each side of the street. The pedestrian area could be expanded to the parking lot on the right. There's a back lane in the lower right corner where food trucks could enter by and park in the square. A stage could also be setup there for events like Crescent Street Grand Prix Festival, Fantasia Film Festival, etc.

      Highlighted in green are areas where a screen could go, solid green are screens on top of buildings, the yellow is where I would put food trucks or a stage:


      These type of squares a great tourist attractions, both Toronto and New York list them at the top of tourist attractions. I also think that having a second public area in the west of downtown for smaller festivals would be a great compliment to the bigger festivals east at Place Des Festivals.
      Let me know what you think, if you have another suggestion, please share. Thank you for reading!
       
       
       
       
    • By loulou123
      voici le lien c est tres intressanthttp://www.geog.umontreal.ca/donnees/geo3282/Ville%20de%20Montr%C3%A9al/Montr%C3%A9al.pdf
    • By mtlurb
      Montreal | Cold? Mais oui, but the winter welcome is warm
       
      By Kristin Jackson
      Seattle Times travel staff
       
      PREV 1 of 3 NEXT
       

      STEPHAN POULIN / TOURISM MONTREAL
      Sled-dog races are just one attraction of Montréal's Fête des Neiges, the winter festival.
       

      KRISTIN JACKSON / THE SEATTLE TIMES
      Saint Joseph's Oratory, seen from a tour bus, is one of Montreal's grandest churches.
       


       
      Related

      Archive | Europe without the euro awaits visitors in historic Montreal
      MONTREAL, Quebec — Taxi drivers kept stopping to offer us rides, beckoning to the steamy warmth of their cabs. No wonder; it was 10 degrees below zero on a February night, and we were the only people on the city sidewalk. "Non, merci," I'd wave off the taxis, determined to get some fresh air after spending the day on stuffy planes en route to this French-speaking Canadian city.
       
      The air certainly was fresh — sparkling clear and frigid as my daughter and I trudged along, swaddled in all the clothes we'd packed. I looked like a walking sleeping bag in my old, very puffy down coat.
       
      On the narrow street, wrought-iron banisters and balconies of Victorian buildings were glazed in ice. Snow sparkled in pools of light cast from living rooms and old-fashioned street lamps.
       
      Another taxi stopped: "Vous êtes fous" — you're crazy — said the driver, as we smiled and walked on.
       
      Maybe it was nuts, but the intense cold of the starry night was exhilarating. And thankfully, it warmed up in the next few days to a relatively balmy 15 degrees.
       
       
      Ask Travel
       
      Seattle Times travel writer and editor Kristin Jackson answers your questions about Montreal and other Canadian destinations in a live Q&A at noon Tuesday on seattletimes.com.
       
       
      Off-season pleasures
       
      Winter visitors to Montreal, a city of 3.6 million that's the largest French-speaking city in the western world after Paris, do miss out on the bustling summer life of sidewalk cafes, music and heritage festivals, and the city's world-class film festival.
       
      Yet there are advantages to the off-season. It's much more peaceful, with none of the summertime hordes of tourists who cram the narrow, cobblestone streets of Vieux Montreal, the historic heart of the old city that was founded in 1642 by French settlers.
       
      Flights and hotels are much cheaper. I paid less than $100 a night for a somewhat ramshackle, but cozy, suite with a kitchenette at the small University Bed & Breakfast. Its location was unbeatable — a short walk to the heart of downtown or to the restaurants of the trendy Boulevard Saint-Laurent.
       
      And winter brings its own pleasures, including outdoor skating rinks in the heart of the city; sleigh rides and cross-country skiing in city parks; and an annual winter festival (La Fête des Neiges) with concerts and other cultural events plus snowy fun, including outdoor games of volleyball and soccer and dog-sled races. And there's indoor fun, from shopping and museums to music clubs and restaurants of every ethnicity.
       
      To warm up, we headed indoors to some of Montreal's excellent museums. The premier art museum, the Musée de Beaux-Arts (Museum of Fine Arts), was a stylish place to wander among paintings and sculpture, from European old masters, including Rembrandt, to Islamic art to moody 19th-century Canadian landscape painting.
       
      Day by day, Montrealers beat the cold in "Underground City" (called RÉSO in French), a 20-mile pedestrian network beneath the city center where it's always balmy. The brightly lit underground concourses are lined with hundreds of stores and eateries, and link the city's major sights, hotels, Metro and train stations.
       
      It felt like an endless shopping mall to me, and I soon coaxed my teen daughter away from the trendy shops to the streets above. When we got too chilled, we'd warm up at one of the many European-style bakeries, indulging in fruit tarts or handmade chocolates. I'd order in French; hearing my mangled grammar, the shopkeepers would immediately switch to English. While only about 18 percent of the city's residents are native English speakers, many Montrealers are bilingual.
       
      On the bus
       
      To see more of the city and stay warm, we hopped on a Gray Line sightseeing bus for a three-hour city tour, from the pastoral heights of Mont-Royal, a 343-hilly park that rises steeply above downtown, to the stately stone buildings of Vieux Montreal and the stadium of Olympic Park, where Montreal hosted the 1976 Summer Olympics.
       
      The bus driver cranked up the heat and his patter: "It's a nice shack, eh," he cackled as we passed the sprawling 19th-century mansions of Westmount, the traditional bastion of rich, native-English-speakers. Later, the bus lumbered past the modest row-houses of East Montreal, where exterior iron staircases, built outside to save space, spiral to the upper floors.
       
      The bus became so drowsily hot, it was a relief to get out at viewpoints and at some of Montreal's grand churches, evidence of the once-firm grip of the Catholic church on Montrealers and all of Quebec province. That changed with the "Quiet Revolution" of the 1960s as Quebec turned more affluent, secular and multicultural.
       
      The faithful (and tourists) still flock, however, to St. Joseph's Oratory, a massive hilltop church by Mont-Royal park. Started as a tiny shrine in 1904 by a devout monk, Brother Andre, it expanded through his relentless efforts into an imposing, ornate church with an almost 200-foot-tall dome. Outdoor stairways climb steeply to the church; pilgrims still struggle up them on their knees, imploring for the healing miracles for which Brother Andre was renowned.
       
      Always a fan of visiting churches, I led my daughter into Notre Dame basilica in Vieux Montreal, the historic heart of the city tucked between the broad (and icy) St. Lawrence River and the downtown highrises.
      We whispered as we entered the ornate Catholic church, with its soaring Gothic-style nave, stained-glass windows and a vaulted blue ceiling that shimmers with 24-karat gold stars.
       
      There was only a handful of tourists, dwarfed by the vastness of the church, which, while it looks almost medieval, was built in the 1820s. It was a place to sit quietly, to think of the religion and cultures intertwined with Montreal, where the Iroquoian natives roamed for thousands of years, where French explorers landed in the 1500s, followed by fur traders, settlers and eventually the British and now waves of immigrants from all over the world.
       
       



      Montreal
      Where to stay
      • Stay at a downtown hotel, where you can easily walk to major sites (even in winter, thanks to the "Underground City." Some top hotels and boutiques are on Rue Sherbrooke Ouest, including the landmark Ritz-Carlton Montreal. Other upscale lodgings include the Hotel Sofitel and InterContinental Hotel.
      • I stayed at the moderately priced University Bed & Breakfast (adjacent to the downtown McGill University, Montreal's premier English-language university). It won't suit everyone — furnishings are eclectic and services minimal — but for about $100 a night, I got a cozy suite in an old-fashioned, townhouse-style building, with a living room, bedroom and kitchenette (www.universitybedandbreakfast.ca or 514-842-6396).
       
       
      • Get hotel information and make reservations through the city's tourism office, www.tourisme-montreal.org/ or phone the Quebec Department of Tourism at 877-266-5687.
      Getting around
      You don't need a car in the city; its center is compact, and the downtown and adjacent Vieux Montreal are ideal to explore on foot. For outlying areas, the city has a good Metro system. Guided bus tours are offered through Gray Line Montreal (www.coachcanada.com/montrealsightseeing/), or take a ride in parks or Vieux Montreal on a "caleche," a horse drawn-carriage (or sometimes sleigh).
      Traveler's tip
      • You don't need to speak French to get by in Montreal; English is widely spoken (However, it's generally appreciated if visitors try to speak a bit of French.)
      • While winter can be the most economical and least crowded time in Montreal, late September/early October and May also can be good times to visit, with lower hotel rates and more moderate weather.
      More information
      • Montreal Tourism: www.tourisme-montreal.org/ or 877-266-5687.
       
      • La F&ering;te des Neiges (winter festival): www.fetedesneiges.com/en/
       
      In a Notre Dame side chapel, Catholic schoolchildren finished their prayers. They filed out into the street, bare-legged and laughing in their gray and navy uniforms, skipping along the snowy sidewalk.
      They didn't give Montreal's winter cold a second thought.
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