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Hi guys. I just got accepted to Concordia university for Masters studies. I am excited but at the same time, terrified because I don't know a word in French (you see, I came to Toronto from Ukraine in 1995 and I was already overwhelmed by learning English, and never caught on any French)

 

As the matter of fact, I had to type in my subject into google translate :rolleyes:

 

Anyway, School starts in a few months and I gotta start relocating sometime in August. I'm working in Toronto and saving up now, but I will have to find a job to support myself..Some people suggested Notre-Dame-De-Grace area because it's immigrant friendly, but the real issue is what kind of work I could get... I also want to bring a car with me. How's the registration proccess, etc?

 

If it makes any difference I have a background in architecture and going to study building engineering.

 

Bye for now!

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You'll be fine at Concordia because its an English university. I would also recommend Notre-Dame-de-Grace to you, as its one of the only areas in the city that you could potentially get by with little or no French. You will certainly pick up some French while you're here, and there are many places that offer French courses, which I believe are subsidized by the Quebec government.

 

As for work, I believe that you'll have a harder time finding work here than in Toronto, although it is possible (provided you have a work visa and have decent English at the very least).

 

As for bringing a car over, I believe it is possible to do that too, but it is much, much cheaper to buy a used car here.

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If you're a canadian citizen, you don't need a work visa to work in quebec (or anywhere else in Canada).

 

If you want to learn some french, why not move into a french area to force yourself to catch some of it ;)

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As for bringing a car over, I believe it is possible to do that too, but it is much, much cheaper to buy a used car here.

 

It's not very complicated to bring a car in Quebec, however your car will have to go through a complete inspection (about 150 $). Where it becomes expensive is if they found that some systems, especially the anti-pollution systems, are not working properly, they will require to have them fixed right away which might become quite expensive. If you put a Quebec plate on your car, you'll also have to switch your driver's licence, I am not sure for Ontario, I use to live in PEI, the licence and the plate are expensive in Quebec but the insurance is much cheaper. Finally, good luck to deal with the SAAQ (the organisation that you will have to deal with for those things), plan an entire day for the process, it's like the passport office, but worst.

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I'll go with the family and say that NDG is probably your best bet for the appartment. What is your budget and what do you expect ? I don't know a lot NDG, but the appartments I have seen there were generally large but not in very good repair (it's not too bad, but some are tired). Also, try to find a place with a parking if you have your car and I doubt you will find convenient to use it to go to school.

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It's not very complicated to bring a car in Quebec, however your car will have to go through a complete inspection (about 150 $). Where it becomes expensive is if they found that some systems, especially the anti-pollution systems, are not working properly, they will require to have them fixed right away which might become quite expensive. If you put a Quebec plate on your car, you'll also have to switch your driver's licence, I am not sure for Ontario, I use to live in PEI, the licence and the plate are expensive in Quebec but the insurance is much cheaper. Finally, good luck to deal with the SAAQ (the organisation that you will have to deal with for those things), plan an entire day for the process, it's like the passport office, but worst.

 

Oh that sounds like a lot of work.. Well I just picked up an older car (1989). It passed E-test and certification last year but next year it will be exempt from e-test because it will be 20 years old. Is that how it works in Quebec? Is there a link what I could read up on this process?

 

This is the reason why I want to switch to Quebec - I hear insurance is much cheaper compared to Toronto's non regulated insurance. I imagine the fees would add up once you take into account licensing and registration..

 

I can't say what my renting budget is, but I rented an apartment in Toronto for $700 a month, it was quite crazy but back then I had a stable job. I moved back with parents cause I got laid off so now my plan would be to pick up a job that I could support myself with, and pay the rent, wherever it may be...

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move in with french roomates, you'll save up on the rent.

 

There's plenty of old cars you could've bought over here ;) and they don't need to be inspected.

 

Also, insurance will still be cheaper even with all the fees.

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Oh that sounds like a lot of work.. Well I just picked up an older car (1989). It passed E-test and certification last year but next year it will be exempt from e-test because it will be 20 years old. Is that how it works in Quebec? Is there a link what I could read up on this process?

 

This is the reason why I want to switch to Quebec - I hear insurance is much cheaper compared to Toronto's non regulated insurance. I imagine the fees would add up once you take into account licensing and registration..

 

There is no such thing as annual inspection for cars in Quebec, but every car arriving from outside must go through it. You can try with your car, but because of it's age, they may be more strict with the inspection because the purpose of it is preventing older car that cannot pass the inspection in the other provinces to land in Quebec.

 

You can make some research on the SAAQ website (don't get confused with SAQ (liquor store) and SQ (provincial police)): http://www.saaq.gouv.qc.ca/en/index.php

 

 

I can't say what my renting budget is, but I rented an apartment in Toronto for $700 a month, it was quite crazy but back then I had a stable job. I moved back with parents cause I got laid off so now my plan would be to pick up a job that I could support myself with, and pay the rent, wherever it may be...

 

Malek's suggestion to move in with french roomate is a good idea if you want to learn french and a bit more about the french canadian culture. Moving on the Plateau Mont-Royal or Mile-End district could be interesting in that case, but you will be a little bit more far away form your shcool. You may also find cheaper option in Petite-Patrie/Rosemont or Hochelaga/Maisonneuve, Verdun, or maybe Cote-des-Neiges. I would avoid Centre-Sud and St-Henri. Downtown and the Old Montreal are too expensive.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm gonna give you a few tips just because you knocked down your xenophobic comments from this thread like the ones you put on SSC (apparently architext has a problem with non-white immigrants, and made it clear it was one of the main reasons of leaving Toronto, to get away from the immigrants, got ignored in SSC because of that and was referred here)

 

Taking French classes is highly encouraged, and it's cheap, they cost about $40 per level (3 months per level, 6 levels) they will examine you first, if you know absolutely no French then you will start from level 1 obviously, I was put into level 4 automatically and you can skip levels if you think it's too easy for you, classes are 100% French, no English whatsoever and get ready to deal with a lot of immigrants, courses are from 8am - 2:30 pm mon - fri or you can take 6pm - 10:30 pm mon - thurs. There is a school in Cote-de-neiges(close to NDG) another one close to the Sherbrooke-Papineau intersection called Centre Lartigue(I used to go there) and another one in the Plateau, there are more but those are the ones I can remember.

 

From previous experience, the worst you can do, is settle in an English-speaking neighbourhood. Look for an apartment in the French-speaking areas, the tenant should have some basic knowledge of English at least, this will make your immersion a whole lot easier.

 

The problem in Montreal is that people will normally address to you in French, then if they hear an accent or see you struggling, they will immediately switch to English, this doesn't help you at all, I would suggest that after a few months avoid speaking English, make an effort and if they switch to English, just reply in French that you don't speak any English and continue speaking French, that always worked for me.

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