Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Montreal faces uphill battle in new economic order

KONRAD YAKABUSKI

Report on Business

April 9, 2009

 

MONTREAL -- The Montreal Exchange, now part of TMX Group, is forwarding journalists' calls to Toronto. The new head of BCE Inc. has not taken up residence in the city that, officially anyway, is still home to the telecom giant's headquarters. Alcan's "head office" is shrinking under parent Rio Tinto. AbitibiBowater answers to its bankers in Charlotte, N.C.

 

When Michael Sabia had a getting-to-know-you lunch last week with Quebec Inc.'s grands fromages, the new head of the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec found himself talking to a sparser crowd than any Caisse chief before him would have likely faced. The ranks of Quebec Inc., that Quiet Revolution embodiment of Quebec's French-speaking business class, are thinning.

 

Where will this all leave Montreal if, as Creative Class guru Richard Florida recently predicted in The Atlantic magazine, "the coming decades will likely see a further clustering of output, jobs and innovation in a smaller number of bigger cities and city-regions"? Can Montreal aspire to be one of them? Or has its fate already been sealed?

 

Prof. Florida, now director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at University of Toronto, warns that "we can't stop the decline of some places, and we would be foolish to try. ... In limited ways, we can help faltering cities to manage their decline better, and to sustain better lives for the people who stay in them."

 

Let's be clear: Montreal is not Detroit. St. Jude himself could not save Motor City. The unemployment rate there now stands at 22 per cent. When only one in 10 Detroiters has a college degree, the jobless rate won't be coming down any time soon. If ever. The current economic crisis, as Prof. Florida notes, will "permanently and profoundly" alter the economic geography of North America.

 

Montreal needs to get busy if it is to carve out a place for itself in this new economic order. It has a lot going for it: A vibrant inner city, a deep talent pool of "knowledge" workers, a diverse population and creativity to burn. Its problem is just that Toronto has even more of these things. Toronto also has the support of its provincial government. Montreal's provincial masters seem at best indifferent to it, if not chronically at war with it.

How else do you explain why, despite decades of promises, the current Liberal government has yet to proceed with the construction of two new mega-hospitals in Montreal to replace a complex network of antiquated institutions spread over multiple sites?

 

If the new hospitals do get built - delivery is now promised between 2013 and 2018 - will there even be enough doctors to work in them? Quebec pays its general practitioners and specialists about a quarter less than Ontario, and a new interprovincial labour mobility agreement will make it easier for them to practise elsewhere. But Montreal can't afford to lose any more of its "brain surgeons," regardless of their profession.

 

In 1976, Montreal and Toronto had nearly identically sized populations, each with about 2.8 million people living within its Census Metropolitan Area (CMA). Since then, the population of the Toronto CMA has doubled to 5.6 million; Montreal has only managed to reach 3.7 million, a 30-per-cent increase in three decades.

 

In its latest Metropolitan Outlook, the Conference Board of Canada predicted that Montreal will post the weakest growth of any major Canadian city over the next half-decade. Though its economy will not contract as much as Toronto's this year, Montreal's output will expand much more slowly once the recession lifts.

 

Part of the explanation for this may lie in another report out this week, this one also supported by Conference Board data, on Toronto's status as a global city. Though the Toronto Board of Trade's Scorecard on Prosperity highlighted Toronto's shortcomings when compared to the 20 other cities studied, it provided even grimmer news for Montreal. Toronto ranked fourth over all. Calgary was first. Montreal was 13th, the poorest performance of any Canadian city on the list.

 

There are grounds for optimism. The proposed Quartier des Spectacles - the redevelopment of a run-down downtown intersection into a hub for the arts - will help Montreal catch up, or at least decline more slowly relative to Toronto's now superior cultural infrastructure.

 

But it's hard not to be disheartened when the top news story in city politics these days is how Mayor Gérald Tremblay's former right-hand man vacationed in the Caribbean on the yacht of a construction magnate just before the latter's consortium won a juicy municipal contract to install water meters. When this much energy gets absorbed in damage control, how much is left for the kind of creative thinking needed to ensure Montreal's position in Prof. Florida's new economic landscape? Or is it already too late for that?

 

[email protected]

 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/GAM.20090409.RYAKABUSKI09ART1924/TPStory/TPComment

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 29
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

The bussiness sector is dying in Montreal.

The most popular jobs offers in Montreal are:

 

call center jobs

low rank administrative staff ( technician and such)

 

All the higher-end jobs have moved elsewhere. It's really painful to find a job here!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

WOW!! KONRAD YAKABUSKI paints a pretty grim picture...but the saddest thing is that it's true! Too many people in this province would rather stick their heads in the sand and pretend everything is fine...instead of rolling up their sleeves and working harder at it!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A tail of two cities...

 

I really like Toronto, really. It's a great city. But when I go there, either for leisure or work, I cannot help it but feel like I'm right behind the big American elephant. Kinda boring, like Entertainment Canada...

 

When I'm in Montreal, I feel like I the elephant is over there, ignoring me most of the time, or not understanding what I say. When it comes, it wants to party. Scary but can be fun.

 

 

Seriously, all Montreal has to do is provide companies with plenty of talented workforce, and undeniable accross-the-board world-wide-publicized tax advantage over its competitors, (as with the videogame industry). That would make the ball rolling.

 

A TGV link between NYC and our fair city would be an added value, as it would offer the north-eastern US a spontaneously access to our joie-de-vivre.

 

In the meantime, the news of Montreal's death from the Toronto media will continue to be exaggerated, you can be sure of that. It has been the case since 1976.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the meantime, the news of Montreal's death from the Toronto media will continue to be exaggerated, you can be sure of that. It has been the case since 1976.

 

Even Though Konrad yakabuski works for the Globe and mail, he's been their Montreal "correspondent" for many years, and as such, he lives in Montreal!

 

On ne peux pas dire que ce que M Yakabuski a écrit était faux. tout ce qu,il a dit était vrai...c'est juste qu'il y a trop de gens ici qui ne veulent PAS le voir!!

 

I really like Toronto, really. It's a great city. But when I go there, either for leisure or work, I cannot help it but feel like I'm right behind the big American elephant. Kinda boring, like Entertainment Canada...

 

Un autre vieux cliché de toronto?? Toronto est platte, il n'y a rien de bon à faire là! Le nightlife est poche, il n'y a pas de culture etc.etc.etc. C'était peut être vrai dans les années 70, mais ce n'est plus le cas aujourd'hui!! Ce sont des stéréotypes propagés surtout par les Montréalais qui sont jaloux!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Even Though Konrad yakabuski works for the Globe and mail, he's been their Montreal "correspondent" for many years, and as such, he lives in Montreal!

 

On ne peux pas dire que ce que M Yakabuski a écrit était faux. tout ce qu,il a dit était vrai...c'est juste qu'il y a trop de gens ici qui ne veulent PAS le voir!!

 

 

 

Un autre vieux cliché de toronto?? Toronto est platte, il n'y a rien de bon à faire là! Le nightlife est poche, il n'y a pas de culture etc.etc.etc. C'était peut être vrai dans les années 70, mais ce n'est plus le cas aujourd'hui!! Ce sont des stéréotypes propagés surtout par les Montréalais qui sont jaloux!

 

Hahaha, Habsfan, tu n'as pas bien lu ce que j'ai écrit, je connais bien Toronto, et j'aime la ville, mais malgré tout, je préfère Montréal. Je ne dis pas que c'est platte Toronto, mais je crois que Montréal est bien plus excitante. Quant aux arguments de Yakabuski, je les trouve clichés aussi.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Toronto c'est le canada...on s'en fiche et puis MTL est plus diversifiée(on est moins touchés par la dépression comparé à TO)...MtL est une ville internationale,bilingue,sexy,tournée vers le futur,très connue en Europe(personne connait TO)...nous avons de nombreuses organisations internationales(TO aucune)un potentiel dans des tas de secteurs et SURTOUT la qualité de vie et les prix pour y vivre sont nettement meilleurs chez nous..sans parler du culturel etc..(et les plus jolies femmes du monde)TO ne sera JAMAIS bilingue,internationale ils le pensent mais c'est faux...les montréalais de ce forum ou d'ailleurs sont trop péssimistes...y a pas de compétition avec TO c'est autre chose un autre pays,un near USA ..TO..aucune envie que Montréal devienne la xième ville US ....c'est avec quebec la seule vraiment différente en amérique nord ou sud...il faut se concentrer la dessus..le gouv du québec commençait hier une méga campagne de publicité sur le québec en Europe...faut dire que c'est pas mal ..visitez ce site : http://montreal2025.com/ et vous lisez les communiqués..y'en a des bonnes nouvelles aussi et à la pelle..MTL est la seule ville qui annonce encore des investissements privés par les temps qui courent c'est une preuve de dynamisme...ce que je comprends pas c'est que TO n'en a pas encore marre de se comparer à MTL...complexe d'infériorité difficile à perdre d'eux autres ...detroit est à la mort(trop peu diversifiée)et bien TO sera la prochaine ghost city dans les années 2030 2040 quand son sytème monoconcentré sur la finance sera mourant...

Don't worry guys we are still at the top taking in consideration our size (greater MTL 3.850.000 inhab)...let's go to the 4 millions mark..

 

Mais une chose qui nous manque c'est des maires avec des projets et une vision..on regrette Drapeau quand on voit ceux qui ont suivi ....faut que ça change ....montreal comme new york (annonçée hier en faillite par bloomberg)ne meurt jamais ..TO on est pas certain du tout ...les gens vont ou l'argent est et si c'est leur culture..vous verrez calgary disparaitre un jour de la map (pas diversifiée)....we are not another detroit,very far from that...MTL is the future of North america

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Toronto c'est le Canada...on s'en fiche

Malheureusement, on ne peut pas s'en ficher autant qu'on voudrait.

 

...et puis MTL est plus diversifiée(on est moins touchés par la dépression comparée à TO)...

Certe !! mais qu'en sera-t-il une fois la dépression passée ?

MtL est une ville internationale,bilingue,sexy,tournée vers le futur,très connue en Europe(personne connait TO)...

Toronto est aussi internationale que Montréal sinon plus. Sa population est majoritairement multi-ethnique ; son festival de film est probablement le troisième plus important au monde. Montréal peut bien être tournée vers le futur mais dans le temsps présent, en attendant "le futur" on fait quoi ?

 

nous avons de nombreuses organisations internationales(TO aucune)
Pas tant que ça et même si c'étais le cas, Toronto nous a damé le pion depuis plusieurs décénnies san avoir "de nombreuses organisations internationales".

 

un potentiel dans des tas de secteurs

C'est bien joli tout ça mais si vraiment nous avons du potentiel qu'attendons-nous pour le mettre à profit ?

et SURTOUT la qualité de vie et les prix pour y vivre sont nettement meilleurs chez nous..

Les villes dominantes dans cette économie planétaire sont extrèmement dispendieuses. Si jamais Montréal finit par sortir de sa torpeur et réussit à se hisser au sommet des grandes villes du monde, elle deviendra probablement aussi chère que les autres grandes villes du monde.

sans parler du culturel etc..(et les plus jolies femmes du monde)

C'est un peu naïf de croire ça. Les Torontoises (les plus jeunes en tous cas) font des progrès comparé à ce qu'elles étaient auparavant. Il leur manque encore le peti "je ne sais quoi" qui fait la différence mais ce ne sont pas les sacs de patates qu'on aimerait parfois qu'elles soient juste pour nous faire sentir mieux. Pour ce qui est du culturel : Toronto et l'Ontario ont mis des milliards pour redorer le blason de la ville et ce n'est qu'une question de temps avant que Montréal perde sa particularité dans ce domaine -si ce n'est pas déjà fait. Cela étant dit, le fait que la culture montréalaise soit spécifiquement francophone lui permet d'être unique au canada et en Amérique du Nord. Cela nous sauvera toujours du désastre -en tous cas tant et aussi longtemps que les francophones alimenteront cette culture.

 

TO ne sera JAMAIS bilingue, internationale. Ils le pensent mais c'est faux...

En effet : elle est multilingue. Ce que tu affirmes est symptomatique de ce que les Montréalais se plaisent à croire pour se donner l'impression qu'ils réussissent à être meilleure que Toronto dans certains domaines. Comme je l'ai déjà dit dans plusieurs fils ici et ailleurs Montréal doit cesser de voir son avenir en tant qu'entité canadienne mais doit se tourner vers le rste de la planète. D'ailleurs c'est ainsi que tu continues tes commenataires...

Les Montréalais de ce forum ou d'ailleurs sont trop péssimistes...

Nous sommes d'accord. Par contre il est difficile de ne pas l'être.

y a pas de compétition avec TO c'est autre chose un autre pays,un near USA ..TO..aucune envie que Montréal devienne la xième ville US....

Voilà. On y est !! Plus précisément : Toronto c'est le Canada et Montréal c'est le Canada et le Québec. Par contre, je suis certain qu'il y en a beaucoup à Montréal qui ne dédaigneraient pas que Montréal deviennent une Xièmeville états-unienne si cela devait lui procurer l'abondance.

c'est avec quebec la seule vraiment différente en amérique nord ou sud...il faut se concentrer la dessus..le gouv du québec commençait hier une méga campagne de publicité sur le québec en Europe...faut dire que c'est pas mal ..visitez ce site : http://montreal2025.com/ et vous lisez les communiqués..y'en a des bonnes nouvelles aussi et à la pelle..MTL est la seule ville qui annonce encore des investissements privés par les temps qui courent c'est une preuve de dynamisme...

Tu sais sur un site qui doit faire la promotion d'un endroit c'est rare qu'on se dépeint comme une place de losers, un endroit dépressif, etc...Si on veut attirer les investissements, il faut se montrer à son meilleur.

(quote]ce que je comprends pas c'est que TO n'en a pas encore marre de se comparer à MTL...complexe d'infériorité difficile à perdre d'eux autres ...Euh !! J'ai franchement l'impression que c'est le contraire : Toronto ignore Montréal. Personne n'en a rien à foutre de Montréal là-bas. Ils sont LA ville principale du Canada. Elle tourne le dos au Canada et est définitivement tourné vers le reste du monde.

Détroit est à la mort(trop peu diversifiée)et bientôt TO sera la prochaine ghost city dans les années 2030 2040 quand son sytème monoconcentré sur la finance sera mourant...

C'est un peu tôt pour faire une telle prédiction et de souhaiter le déclin de Toronto dans un avenir plutôt lointain et ça ne règlera pas celui de Montréal en ce moment.

Don't worry guys we are still at the top taking in consideration our size (greater MTL 3.850.000 inhab)...let's go to the 4 millions mark...

Je ne sais pas ce que tu fumes mais ça doit être du bon !! Je suis fou de Montréal mais je ne me cache pas la tête dans le sable. Nous avons du potentiel mais pour l'instant nous vivons une période de torpeur et pour une raison que je ne m'explique pas nous sommes paralysés, tétanisés. Il nous faut un remède de cheval pour nous sortir de cet immobilisme et nous pourrons parler comme tu le fais en ce moment.

Mais une chose qui nous manque c'est des maires avec des projets et une vision..on regrette Drapeau quand on voit ceux qui ont suivi ....faut que ça change ....montreal comme new york (annonçée hier en faillite par bloomberg)ne meurt jamais ..TO on est pas certain du tout ...les gens vont ou l'argent est et si c'est leur culture..vous verrez calgary disparaitre un jour de la map (pas diversifiée)....we are not another detroit,very far from that...MTL is the future of North America

Encore une fois, il ne faut pas souhaiter que ces villes déclinent. Il faut souhaiter qu'il y ait assez de place dans l'économie mondiale pour toutes ces villes canadiennes. Évidemment, ça aiderait sûrement Montréal d'avoir un maire avec une vision mais à défaut d'en avoir un il y a tout de même assez de forces vives dans notre ville pour lui permettre de redécoller, de se remettre sur pied, de sortir son épingle du jeu.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yarabundi a raison sur toute la ligne. Simple correction: le Festival de films de Toronto est le deuxième plus important au monde après celui de Cannes, facilement et indubitablement.

 

Il faut vraiment être d'un optimisme naïf pour ne pas s'apercevoir que Toronto domine désormais Montréal sur le plan culturel, sans parler bien sûr de l'économie. Les musées torontois sont plus gros, plus riches. L'opéra de Toronto dame facilement le pion à celui de Montréal (on a un meilleur orchestre symphonique, certes, mais toujours pas de salle digne de ce nom), la scène théâtrale torontoise est une des plus importantes dans le monde (en anglais, on s'entend), les médias y sont plus nombreux, plus riches, plus influents sur toute la ligne, le nightlife rivalise désormais avec celui de Montréal (je suis sorti dans des clubs à Toronto qui ferment aux petites heures du matin - ils arrêtent de servir de l'alcool à deux heures, mais restent ouverts quand même, ce que nous ne pouvons pas faire ici - la ville ne délivre plus de permis d'after-hours)... je pourrais continuer comme ça toute la journée. J'aime passionnément ma ville, mais quand j'y reviens après un séjour à Toronto, ça me saute aux yeux jusqu'à quel point notre ville est rendue provinciale, endormie... tétanisée, comme le dit Yarabundi. Ça commence à devenir vraiment décourageant.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share




×
×
  • Create New...
adblock_message_value
adblock_accept_btn_value