Recommended Posts

Ottawa sells buildings in $1.64B lease-back deal

 

 

Aug 20, 2007 04:48 PM

 

 

Canadian Press

 

OTTAWA – The federal government has sold nine office properties to a Vancouver-based real-estate company for $1.64 billion, but will lease them back for the next 25 years.

 

Larco Investments Ltd. made the purchase after what the government called "an extensive open, transparent and competitive process" involving properties in Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, Toronto, Ottawa and Montreal.

 

Public Works Minister Michael Fortier says the government sought independent advice from Deutsche Bank before making the sale, concluding it is a fair deal for taxpayers, particularly since markets were favourable at the time.

 

A government statement says the deal makes good sense because it transfers ownership risk for major capital costs to the private sector and ensures the buildings are properly maintained.

 

It says the conditions of the leases are fair and stable, and Ottawa will maintain the right to name the buildings.

 

Fortier says office space is a commodity and government does not need to own it to use it.

 

The transaction increases the percentage of leased properties in the Public Works portfolio from to 47 per cent from 43.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Une bonne nouvelle, le gouvernement a pas besoin de gérer des buildings, c'est pas sa buisness (il gaspille déjà assez).

 

Aussi, quelqu'un voudrait faire le lien entre se débarasser de buildings de Montréal au cas d'une éventuelle séparation?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Une bonne nouvelle, le gouvernement a pas besoin de gérer des buildings, c'est pas sa buisness (il gaspille déjà assez).

 

Exactement. C'est en plein ce qu'on essaie de faire comprendre aux compagnies qui veulent êtrer proprios de leurs édifices. Nous essayons de leurs faire comprendre que ce n'est pas la meilleure chose pour eux. Ils sont mieux de louer, et de ne pas se soucier des problèmes avec la "brique et le Mortier"!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By budgebandit
      https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/chateau-laurier-redesign-denounced-as-heritage-vandalism-1.3961277
      Chateau Laurier redesign denounced as 'heritage vandalism'
      An image of the proposed seven-storey addition at the rear of the Chateau Laurier.
          25                 25        
      The Canadian Press 
      Published Wednesday, June 6, 2018 7:34AM EDT  OTTAWA -- A preservation society is blasting the redesign of an addition to Ottawa's stately Chateau Laurier hotel as "heritage vandalism," but the lead architect on the project says a contemporary approach is the best way to protect the property's history.
      Heritage Ottawa fired yet another salvo this week in its ongoing campaign to prevent the proposed glass and metal structure from moving forward at the national historic site.
      "Heritage Ottawa remains unimpressed -- and is gravely concerned that the City of Ottawa may be on track to approve what would be the most disgraceful act of heritage vandalism of our generation," the organization said in a statement Sunday.
      PHOTOS
        A rendering of the original 2016 proposed Chateau Laurier addition.
      Leslie Maitland, who co-chairs the organization, welcomed some of the modifications in the latest revision of modernist design, which has faced intense backlash since it was first unveiled in late 2016.
      The most recent iteration reduces the addition's height to seven stories in order to preserve views of the hotel, according to the City of Ottawa's website, and has also added limestone accents.
      But Maitland said the changes aren't enough to overcome the structure's fundamental clash with the chateau's "picturesque" sensibility.
      "They come up with several iterations, but they're basically all versions of a glass box stuck onto this magnificent, Edwardian chateau," she said in an interview Tuesday. "They can't even think outside the box."
      Peter Clewes of Toronto-based firm architectsAlliance, who is the lead architect on the project, said he shares Heritage Ottawa's admiration for the hotel's whimsical style, but they starkly diverge in their views of the most effective strategy to preserve the property's heritage.
      "We're trying to do a building of our time, and we don't want to confuse the cultural history of Ottawa," Clewes said. "We certainly don't want to demean the hotel in any way."
      Clewes said designing a structure in the same style of the hotel would likely amount to ahistorical mimickry, and could create confusion about what elements of the property are new, and what has been there for more than a century.
      "When you're dealing with a building of national historic significance, you don't want to confuse history," he said. "Our focus has been trying to create a building that's deferential to the hotel, and allows it a clear legibility of the hotel itself -- what is historic and what is new."
      The architect said the public criticism of the project has at times been hurtful, but the process of consulting with stakeholders, government officials and citizens has ultimately influenced his team's designs for the better.
      Ottawa City Council is slated to discuss the project later this month.
      -- By Adina Bresge in Toronto
    • By Mondo_Grosso
      I know that many of you are against Montreal having it's own version of Time Square, but the point of this post is not to debate that. Rather, it's to look at potential locations if we had to chose one.
      Based on examples like Time Square in New York, Shibuya District in Tokyo,  Piccadilly Circus in London, Dundas Square in Toronto, I defined my own criteria as:
      Must be by an open area Must be close to commercial sector Must be accessible by metro At that, I have come up with Square Concordia, this is the area today:

      Here is why I think that this is the ideal area:
      There are 3 large blind walls for the screens High density of 24/hour restaurants and bars High levels of foot traffic at all times Proximity to various festivals There are already renovated squares on each side of the street. The pedestrian area could be expanded to the parking lot on the right. There's a back lane in the lower right corner where food trucks could enter by and park in the square. A stage could also be setup there for events like Crescent Street Grand Prix Festival, Fantasia Film Festival, etc.

      Highlighted in green are areas where a screen could go, solid green are screens on top of buildings, the yellow is where I would put food trucks or a stage:


      These type of squares a great tourist attractions, both Toronto and New York list them at the top of tourist attractions. I also think that having a second public area in the west of downtown for smaller festivals would be a great compliment to the bigger festivals east at Place Des Festivals.
      Let me know what you think, if you have another suggestion, please share. Thank you for reading!
       
       
       
       
    • By Djentmaster001
      Various pics that I've taken in Montreal, mainly of street art, but I also post pics of buildings, cars, neighbourhoods, etc.... 
       


       



       
      I post plenty of pictures here at https://the514lifeblog.wordpress.com/
       
       
    • By mtlurb
      Nom: Tour Deloitte
      Hauteur en étages: 26
      Hauteur en mètres: 135
      Coût du projet: 100 000 000,00$
       
      Promoteur: Cadillac Fairview
      Architecte: KPF et Groupe IBI DAA
      Entrepreneur général: PCL Constructors / Construction C.A.L.
      Emplacement: http://www.mtlurb.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=4423&d=1340458961
       
      Début de construction: Octobre 2012
      Fin de construction: Juin 2015
       
      Site internet: http://latourdeloitte.ca/
       
      Lien webcam:
       
      Autres informations:
       
      * Louée à 70.3% (septembre 2013)
      * 48 000m2 (514 000p2) de superficie de bureaux
      * Édifice LEED platine
      * Le locataire principal sera la firme Deloitte pour 160 000p2
      * Rio Tinto Alcan sera locataire des étages 18 à 26
      * Signature, 32-foot-high lobby facing the historic Windsor Court
      * Outdoor courtyard with a skating rink, public seating and park area qui sera nommé "Cour Rio Tinto Alcan"
      * Bush shed (a heritage-designated remnant of Windsor Station's original rail platforms) will be incorporated into the window line of the courtyard-level lobby
      * 135 mètres
       
      Rumeurs:
       
      Aperçu du projet:
       

       
      9 autres images: http://mtlurb.com/forums/showthread.php?p=146231#post146231
       
      Vidéo promotionnelle:
    • By IluvMTL
      http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=5798,42657625&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL&id=19271&ret=http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/pls/portal/url/page/prt_vdm_fr/rep_annonces_ville/rep_communiques/communiques
       
      Dévoilement des finalistes du concours visant l'intégration d'une œuvre d'art public sur la promenade Jeanne-Mance
      16 juillet 2012
      Montréal, le 16 juillet 2012 -La responsable de la culture, du patrimoine, du design et de la condition féminine au comité exécutif de la Ville de Montréal, Mme Helen Fotopulos, a le plaisir d'annoncer le nom des six finalistes du concours en art public qui a été lancé afin d'intégrer une œuvre en cinq temps à la future promenade Jeanne-Mance, au cœur du Quartier des spectacles. Il s'agit de David Armstrong-Six, Valérie Blass, Michel de Broin, Valérie Kolakis, Stephen Schofield et Louise Viger.
       
      « Les travaux d'aménagement des espaces publics dans cette partie du Quartier des spectacles représentent une belle occasion de faire une place importante à l'art public. L'intégration d'une œuvre fragmentée en cinq éléments distincts permettra aux passants d'en faire une lecture séquentielle et ce parcours véhiculera très certainement l'identité unique de cet espace qui constitue le cœur culturel de la métropole. En tenant un concours visant l'intégration d'une nouvelle œuvre d'envergure, nous réaffirmons notre engagement à favoriser l'accès à l'art public aux quatre coins de la ville et je tiens à féliciter les six finalistes qui, par leur parcours et leur créativité, ont su se démarquer auprès des membres du jury », a déclaré Mme Fotopulos.
       
      L'œuvre fragmentée qui découlera de ce concours s'intégrera aux cinq plateformes qui seront aménagées prochainement sur le côté est de la rue Jeanne-Mance, entre la rue Sainte-Catherine et le boulevard René-Lévesque. Les cinq éléments qui constitueront l'œuvre permettront aux passants de faire une lecture narrative de l'œuvre ainsi que de l'espace qui l'accueille et contribueront grandement à mettre en valeur l'art public dans le Quartier des spectacles. Clin d'œil à ce haut-lieu du divertissement culturel, l'œuvre devra témoigner de la nouvelle identité de ce secteur, véritable témoin de la créativité et de la diversité culturelle montréalaise.
       
      Rappelons que ce projet sera réalisé dans le cadre de la Politique d'intégration des arts à l'architecture et à l'environnement des bâtiments et des sites gouvernementaux publics du gouvernement du Québec. En outre, dans son cadre d'intervention en art public adopté en juin 2010, la Ville s'est engagée à intégrer l'art public dans tous les grands projets d'aménagement urbain sous sa responsabilité et à inciter chacun des arrondissements à se doter d'un plan d'intervention dans ce domaine.
       
      À propos des finalistes
       
      David Armstrong-Six est représenté à Montréal par la Parisian Laundry. Ses œuvres ont été présentées notamment à la Kunstlerhaus Bethanien à Berlin (2012), à la Biennale de Montréal (2011) et au Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal (2008).
       
      Valérie Blass est représentée à Montréal par la Parisian Laundry. Elle a remporté le Prix Louis-Comptois de la Ville de Montréal en 2010 et le Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal lui a consacré une exposition solo en 2012.
       
      Michel de Broin est représenté à Barcelone par la Galerie Toni Tàpies. Il a réalisé plusieurs œuvres d'art public tant au pays qu'à l'étranger, notamment Révolutions et L'arc qui font partie de la collection municipale. Il présentera une rétrospective de son travail au Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal en 2013.
       
      Valérie Kolakis est représentée à Montréal par la Galerie Donald Browne. Récemment, ses œuvres ont été présentées à l'Œil de poisson à Québec (2012), à Plein Sud (2011) et à la Triennale québécoise au Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal (2011).
       
      Stephen Schofield est représenté à Montréal par la Galerie Joyce Yahouda. Ses sculptures ont fait l'objet d'une exposition à la New-Jersey City University (2011) et au Textile Museum of Canada à Toronto (2010). Il est récipiendaire du Prix Louis-Comptois de la Ville de Montréal (2005) et a réalisé deux œuvres d'art intégrées à l'architecture en 2012.
       
      Louise Viger a présenté ses œuvres au Musée national des beaux-arts de Québec (2010 et 2011) et au Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal (2000). Elle a réalisé plusieurs œuvres d'art public dont Des lauriers pour mémoire-Jean-Duceppe (1923-1990) qui fait partie de la collection municipale.