Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Do we dare think big again?

After three decades of decline, stagnation and costly federalist-separatist battles, Montreal politicians have taken to looking in rear-view mirrors to the Drapeau era megaprojects, when the term 'Big O' could have stood for 'optimism'

 

JAMES MENNIE, The Gazette

Published: 10 hours ago

 

"Of all the achievements of the Drapeau administration," says Paul-André Linteau, a professor of history at the Université du Québec à Montréal, "Expo 67 occupies a special place in our collective imagination.

 

"When we marked the 40th anniversary of Expo last year, it was heavily covered by the media, and full of teary-eyed, nostalgic baby boomers recalling the extraordinary summer they spent at Expo 67.

 

"But often we experience a kind of deformation of memory that sees an individual's recollection transformed into something the entire community believes it experienced. Not everybody had a great summer in 1967, but the boomers expressing themselves on TV or radio (create) a strong, positive perception of Expo 67."

 

Nostalgia is a valuable commodity in politics. Candidates who campaign on a platform of change usually depict their promises through the prism of the past. U.S. presidential candidate Barack Obama hearkens to a day when the United States was economically strong and enjoyed the world's respect and opponent John McCain speaks of a simpler age when ordinary people had a role in determining what direction their country took. How much truth exists in either version of the past is debatable, but it makes for good oratory.

 

Locally, where the political stakes may be less, the good old days aren't hard to locate.

 

After 30 years of economic decline, an exodus of taxpayers to the suburbs and political trench warfare that pitted separatists against federalists, Montreal politicians in the here and now are hard pressed to rally the electorate to the promise of a better tomorrow. They've decided, instead, to stake their political futures on the memory of a better yesterday - in fact, a very specific collection of yesterdays from April 27 to Oct. 29, 1967, the golden days of Expo and a mayor named Jean Drapeau.

 

The latest example occurred last week, when municipal opposition leader Benoit Labonté announced that he wanted Montrealers to work together to submit their city as a candidate to host the Universal Exposition for 2020.

 

Brandishing a pair of passports from Expo 67, Labonté said the fair evokes memories of "the greatness of Montreal ... of a time when everything seemed possible.

 

"The future seemed to belong to us, and it was probably the biggest moment of collective pride felt by Montrealers in the 20th century."

 

Arguing that a second exposition could jump-start Montreal as a world class metropolis, Labonté invited all Montrealers - including Mayor Gérald Tremblay- to join in an effort to bring the show here.

 

While some news organizations reported that Labonté's plan seemed to come out of the blue, the opposition leader had hinted broadly at it during an interview with The Gazette in May, saying that Montrealers needed a common cause they could focus their energies on and noting that the last time such a sentiment existed here was between Expo 67 and the 1976 summer Olympics.

 

Whatever the genesis of Labonté's invitation, it was dismissed by city hall three hours after being made.

 

"We like to dream with our eyes open," said Montreal executive committee member Alan De Sousa, describing Labonté's plan as "an electoral balloon."

 

De Sousa's response wasn't totally unexpected, but it ignored the fact that pointing to the Drapeau-era as an inspiration for the future isn't a ploy invented by the municipal opposition.

 

Tremblay has never spoken publicly about staging another world's fair here, but three years ago he did float the idea of luring another major event from the Drapeau-era back to Montreal.

 

 

In August 2005 and flushed by the apparent success of the World Aquatics Championships, Tremblay mused that "Montreal will not wait another 30 years to renew acquaintances with the world," and that the city would "think" about bidding for the 2016 Olympic Games. Even though the idea went over like a lead balloon, the mayor's reverence for the Montreal of a generation ago came to the fore in speeches given during the 40th anniversary of Expo 67.

 

"We owe to Jean Drapeau a great part of Montreal's recognition and international growth," Tremblay told a Board of Trade lunch as a slide show of Expo 67 pavilions flickered behind him.

 

"Expo was a great project that marked our history and our imagination - an audacious project, the expression of an immense confidence in ourselves, in our capacity to create and invent."

 

Even Projet Montréal, an opposition party holding one seat on city council and an equal amount of contempt for Tremblay and Labonté's policies, isn't immune from the lure of Expo. Party leader Richard Bergeron once observing that if Drapeau had dithered as much as the present administration, "the métro would never have been built."

 

But while Linteau acknowledges that changes were afoot in Montreal and Quebec in 1967, it would be a mistake to think it was a magical time for Montreal.

 

"The '60s were exceptional years," he says. "It was the Kennedy years in the United States.

 

"We often look only at what Quebec was going through, but we were in the middle of a universe in transition."

 

In fact, while the year may be remembered through rose-coloured mists, the reality was that the bloom was already leaving this city.

 

Linteau acknowledges the optimism of the time - "when you consider all the projects that were being proposed, we thought there'd be 7 million people living in Montreal by 1980, that there would be 15 million visitors at Montreal airport by the end of the 1970s."

 

But, he adds, "that optimism was quickly deflated because Expo occurred about the same time the decline of Montreal began.

 

"Drapeau didn't care. Economic development and things of that nature were too trivial for him. He didn't notice our being overtaken by Toronto which, even by 1960, had passed Montreal as a major metropolis."

 

Linteau notes that people usually like to be a part of something bigger than themselves.

 

"A lot of humanity's monuments are the result of policies of grandeur and waste," he says. "Big projects are a bit megalomanical, but they get things moving, create change.

 

"What's certain is that it's been a long while since we had that kind of project in Montreal. Just look at the bickering over the superhospitals."

 

[email protected]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By mtlurb
      REM de l'est
      Je propose de créer un nouveau fil pour ce projet sorti de nulle part cet après-midi.
      http://journalmetro.com/actualites/montreal/1655839/quebec-allonge-15m-pour-etudier-de-grands-projets-de-transport-collectif/
      "de même que l’extension du Réseau express métropolitain (REM) dans l’emprise du train de l’Est."
    • By ChrisDVD
      Réseau express métropolitain (REM) phase 1

      26 stations / 67 km
      Liens utiles :
      http://www.rem.info/ http://www.nouvlr.com/ https://surlesrails.ca/ https://www.devisubox.com/dv/dv.php5?pgl=Project/interface&dv_pjv_sPjvName=Reseau Express Metropolitain https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRulWJrtFo8KNxr-2FgILhQ https://twitter.com/REMgrandmtl https://www.instagram.com/rem_metro/ https://www.facebook.com/REMgrandmtl/
      TRAINS
      Voiture de type métro léger, électrique Flotte de 212 voitures Alstom Metropolis Rame de 4 voitures en heure de pointe; rame de 2 voitures en hors pointe Capacité de 150 passagers par voiture (assis et debout) Configuration entre deux voitures de type "boa" Alimentation électrique par caténaire Systèmes et conduite automatisée des trains Vitesse maximale de 100 km/h STATIONS / GARES
      Quais d'environ 80 m de long Portes palières sur les quais Accessibles à pied, vélo, par autobus et en voiture Accès universel Ascenseurs, escaliers mécaniques et supports à vélo Wi-Fi offert sur toute la ligne Préposés circulant dans les rames et stations pour information et contrôle ---
      Fil de discussion pour les prolongements hypothétiques:
      https://mtlurb.com/index.php?/topic/15107-rem-expansion-future/
       
       
       
    • By mtlurb
      Rue Saint-Denis : une longue terrasse pour minimiser l'impact des travaux
       
      Mise à jour le mercredi 10 juin 2015 à 20 h 10 HAE
       
      La Ville de Montréal aménagera une terrasse sur la rue Saint-Denis entre les rues Duluth et Marie-Anne afin de maintenir la vie commerciale de la zone touchée par des travaux de réfection majeurs.
       
      La « Grande Terrasse Rouge » sera déployée dès cet été, mais les travaux ne commenceront qu'en septembre 2015 et devraient se terminer en novembre 2016.
       
      D'autres installations « décoratives » et « festives » seront aménagées, notamment en utilisant les fameux cônes orange. Des banderoles seront aussi suspendues dans les airs pour mettre en valeur les commerces de cette rue.
       
      Les espaces de stationnement seront par ailleurs relocalisés et le chantier sera nettoyé quotidiennement. Des passerelles permettront aussi aux piétons de se déplacer entre les commerces et restaurants.
       
      Les travaux permettront de changer le mobilier d'éclairage, de changer les conduites d'aqueduc et d'égout et de reconstruire les trottoirs.
      Le coût total de ces travaux est évalué à 14,4 millions de dollars, dont 4 millions pour les mesures de mitigation.
       
      Cette initiative fait partie du nouveau programme d'aide financière pour réduire les nuisances sur les artères commerciales lors de chantiers de construction dans la métropole.
       
      « Dans le passé, on a entendu qu'il n'y avait pas d'effort de la part de la Ville de Montréal pour aider les commerçants », a expliqué le responsable des Infrastructures de la Ville de Montréal, Lionel Perez.
       
      Il souligne que la plus grande partie des travaux aura lieu en 2016, et qu'en 2015 « ce sera tolérable ».
       
      Des commerçants mitigés
       
      Certains commerçants accueillent positivement ces travaux et croient que les mesures de mitigation seront efficaces. Ce n'est toutefois pas le cas de tous.
       
      « Oui la période des travaux sera difficile, oui ça va être le bordel quelque part sur la rue, ce sera des travaux majeurs, mais avec les mesures de mitigation et dès 2017, ça va être l'occasion de faire renaître cette rue majeure de Montréal », a affirmé le directeur du marketing des ventes des Guides de voyage Ulysse, Olivier Gougeon.
       
      « Je ne sais pas si ça peut permettre de sécuriser le périmètre de chantier, ce n'est pas si pire. Mais je ne pense vraiment pas que ça sera attractif pour les gens. Je pense qu'ils vont encore plus magasiner ailleurs », a répondu Julie Peneau, une vendeuse de la boutique Paris pas cher.
       
      M. Perez affirme de son côté que les commerçants ont été consultés à plus de neuf reprises concernant les travaux et leurs revendications. Selon lui, ils sont « très contents » de voir que la Ville de Montréal s'investit pour attirer des piétons, des clients, mais ils demandent à être rassurés en ce qui concerne le stationnement.
       

       
       

      Vue aérienne de la rue Saint-Denis, où on peut voir la « Grande Terrasse Rouge » qui sera aménagée cet été. Photo : Ville de Montréal
    • By Nameless_1
      La Ville de Montréal dévoile sa programmation hivernale
      26 novembre 2020 | mise à jour le: 26 novembre 2020 à 17:14 temps de lecture: 5 minutesPar:  Zacharie GoudreaultMétro

      De nouvelles places publiques, des sentiers mieux entretenus dans les parcs, des patinoires: la Ville de Montréal a présenté jeudi sa programmation hivernale. Elle espère ainsi inciter les Montréalais à «bouger en sécurité» au cours des prochains mois, tout en stimulant l’achat local.
      La pandémie, combinée aux journées plus courtes et grises qui marquent l’arrivée de l’hiver, ont affecté le moral des citoyens, constate la mairesse de Montréal, Valérie Plante.
      «Il y a cette fatigue qui s’installe et qui est plus difficile pour certaines personnes. C’est un climat qui est assez anxiogène», a-t-elle souligné jeudi après-midi lors d’une conférence de presse à l’hôtel de ville. Elle a alors présenté la programmation hivernale 2020-2021 de la Ville de Montréal.
      ...
      Des stations hivernales
      Ce plan prévoit notamment l’aménagement de 25 stations hivernales dans 17 arrondissements de la métropole au cours des prochaines semaines. Celles-ci prendront forme près d’artères commerciales, voire sur celles-ci, afin d’inciter les Montréalais à aller faire leurs emplettes dans les commerces locaux. Ces petites places publiques seront lumineuses afin d’attirer le regard.
      ...
      Pas pour se réchauffer
      Afin d’éviter que ces petites places publiques deviennent des lieux de rassemblements, aucune programmation d’activités culturelles ou ludiques ne sera mise en place pour ces lieux. Par ailleurs, les stations hivernales ne seront pas chauffées.
      ...
      Plus d’activités dans les grands parcs
      Le programme prévoit par ailleurs la création de nouvelles patinoires, dont une au square Cabot et une seconde au parc Jean-Drapeau. Ce dernier accueillera également une glissade, de même que de nouveaux kilomètres de sentiers pédestres et d’autres dédiés aux fat bike et au ski de fond, entre autres.
      Par ailleurs, bien que la Fête des neiges n’aura pas lieu cette année au parc Jean-Drapeau, plusieurs activités gratuites y seront offertes à partir du 19 décembre, assure la Ville. Cette programmation proposera notamment la découverte d’un sentier historique en raquettes et une exposition extérieure baptisée «Océans».
      ...
      Contrôler l’achalandage
      La Ville entend d’ailleurs s’assurer de surveiller les grands parcs cet hiver pour en limiter l’achalandage. Cet été, l’administration municipale a notamment dû fermer le stationnement du parc du Mont-Royal à plusieurs reprises parce que trop de personnes s’y sont rendues les jours de beau temps.
      «Il y a le mont Royal, mais il y a d’autres endroits. C’est ce que je veux dire aux Montréalais.» -Valérie Plante, mairesse de Montréal
      https://journalmetro.com/actualites/montreal/2583376/la-ville-de-montreal-devoile-sa-programmation-hivernale/
       
×
×
  • Create New...
adblock_message_value
adblock_accept_btn_value