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Le Québec, un des pires marchés du travail sur le continent


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Le Québec, un des pires marchés du travail sur le continent

28 août 2008 - 09h50

Presse Canadienne

 

 

Une étude conclut que le Québec se classe à l'avant-dernière place en matière de performance de son marché du travail au Canada, l'une des pires en Amérique du Nord.

 

L'étude publiée jeudi par l'Institut Fraser compare la performance du marché du travail dans les 10 provinces canadiennes et les 50 États américains.

 

Jean-François Minardi, analyste de politiques publiques à l'Institut, indique que le Québec souffre d'un taux de chômage élevé, d'un important chômage de longue durée et la province affiche également l'un des plus mauvais résultats en matière de productivité du travail dans toute l'Amérique du Nord.

 

L'étude comprend une mesure de la performance du marché du travail fondée sur cinq indicateurs soit la croissance totale du niveau d'emploi, celle de l'emploi dans le secteur privé, les taux de chômage, la durée des périodes de chômage et la productivité du travail sur une période s'étalant de 2003 à 2007.

 

Le taux de chômage et la durée de recherche d'un emploi associés à la productivité des travailleurs ainsi que la mauvaise performance en matière de création d'emplois dans le secteur privé ont eu une influence négative sur le résultat global de la province.

 

L'Alberta a le marché du travail le plus performant de toute l'Amérique du Nord, tandis que la Colombie-Britannique se classe deuxième au Canada et 11e en Amérique du Nord.

 

En matière d'emploi dans la fonction publique, un écart est visible entre les provinces canadiennes et les États américains. Le Québec se classe 51e sur 60 en raison de son taux élevé d'emploi dans la fonction publique qui représente 19,8% de l'emploi total de la province.

 

L'étude révèle aussi que le Québec a un taux de syndicalisation de 40,2%.

 

Une raison expliquant ce taux de syndicalisation élevé est la législation du travail québécoise qui est, selon l'Institut, favorable aux syndicats. Or, la recherche démontre que les lois qui régissent les rapports entre employeurs et employés freinent la performance des marchés du travail lorsqu'elles favorisent un groupe au détriment d'un autre.

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Le Québec, un des pires marchés du travail sur le continent

28 août 2008 - 09h50

Presse Canadienne

 

 

Une étude conclut que le Québec se classe à l'avant-dernière place en matière de performance de son marché du travail au Canada, l'une des pires en Amérique du Nord.

 

L'étude publiée jeudi par l'Institut Fraser compare la performance du marché du travail dans les 10 provinces canadiennes et les 50 États américains.

 

Jean-François Minardi, analyste de politiques publiques à l'Institut, indique que le Québec souffre d'un taux de chômage élevé, d'un important chômage de longue durée et la province affiche également l'un des plus mauvais résultats en matière de productivité du travail dans toute l'Amérique du Nord.

 

L'étude comprend une mesure de la performance du marché du travail fondée sur cinq indicateurs soit la croissance totale du niveau d'emploi, celle de l'emploi dans le secteur privé, les taux de chômage, la durée des périodes de chômage et la productivité du travail sur une période s'étalant de 2003 à 2007.

 

Le taux de chômage et la durée de recherche d'un emploi associés à la productivité des travailleurs ainsi que la mauvaise performance en matière de création d'emplois dans le secteur privé ont eu une influence négative sur le résultat global de la province.

 

L'Alberta a le marché du travail le plus performant de toute l'Amérique du Nord, tandis que la Colombie-Britannique se classe deuxième au Canada et 11e en Amérique du Nord.

 

En matière d'emploi dans la fonction publique, un écart est visible entre les provinces canadiennes et les États américains. Le Québec se classe 51e sur 60 en raison de son taux élevé d'emploi dans la fonction publique qui représente 19,8% de l'emploi total de la province.

 

L'étude révèle aussi que le Québec a un taux de syndicalisation de 40,2%.

 

Une raison expliquant ce taux de syndicalisation élevé est la législation du travail québécoise qui est, selon l'Institut, favorable aux syndicats. Or, la recherche démontre que les lois qui régissent les rapports entre employeurs et employés freinent la performance des marchés du travail lorsqu'elles favorisent un groupe au détriment d'un autre.

 

Good morning,

this is my first post and I would like to thank malek racho for helping me as I had account problems.

Also I am sorry for not writing in french by I have keyboard problems that I will correct soon.

 

No coming to this subject, I know at least 10 guys who got their masters and PhDs in engineering from here and they left elsewhere even though they looked for jobs in here for around a year. They go somwhere in canada and they find jobs in a span of weeks or a couple of months. We pay from our own pocket and other provinces receive all the benefits. Then you hear politicians say that they will invest in education more and more, and companies saying that they can not find enought qualified workers in IT, ENG and other fields. Something is wrong in this place and it will not be fixed.

 

Not the ideal 1st post, but what can I do

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Everyone says alberta is rich because of oil, but really, it is low taxes and low beuraucracy. It is a model that BC followed, and look! growth and prosperity. Now pretty much every province is following suit.

 

N.B. just delcared that they no longer want to be dependant on transfer payments from the rest of canada, they want to be an equal partner, so they are lowering corporate tax from 15% to 5%.

 

Quebec's taxes are by far the highest in canada, and not coming down at all. And beuraucracy, look at the paper forms for quebec personal income tax!!!! 3 pages just for assurance medicament! who dreams up this crap?? Every other provincial tax is one page that you slip in to your federal tax form. Alberta has a 10% tax. you make $100, you pay $10. you make $100,000 you pay $10,000. How much money do they save by 1) not having the infrastructure to support such a complicated system as quebec and investigate fraud. and 2) allowing people to stop filling out forms and just get more important things done.

 

Quebec is on a fast track to becoming the only "have-not" province. rather than criticize the rest of canada, quebec should enter into some healthy competition.

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Good morning,

this is my first post and I would like to thank malek racho for helping me as I had account problems.

Also I am sorry for not writing in french by I have keyboard problems that I will correct soon.

 

No coming to this subject, I know at least 10 guys who got their masters and PhDs in engineering from here and they left elsewhere even though they looked for jobs in here for around a year. They go somwhere in canada and they find jobs in a span of weeks or a couple of months. We pay from our own pocket and other provinces receive all the benefits. Then you hear politicians say that they will invest in education more and more, and companies saying that they can not find enought qualified workers in IT, ENG and other fields. Something is wrong in this place and it will not be fixed.

 

Not the ideal 1st post, but what can I do

 

 

pleasure helping you!

 

 

I can attest that its very difficult for lots of people to find jobs here, i don't know why. High expectations? Employers low balling?

 

Or is it just too much taxes that the employers have to pay for each new employer.

 

Guys, maybe someone with better HR knowledge could help us clarify what an employer has to pay for each new employer and on the salary volume.

 

I know an employer has to pay its share of RRQ, 1% in education, parental insurance, CSST, EI, and others...

 

How can employer compete with bigger salaries AND lower income taxes? Most probably they can't and loose their edge.

 

On the other hand, our fiscal system in Quebec is geared toward families with children not singles. Our fiscal system is much more intresting when you have kids than when you don't.

 

The problem with that, is that you're more willing to travel and leave your home when you're single than when you're with a family.

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Just to give you an example, a software programmer (the field i know), can earn around 45-55k a year with a year or two of experience.

 

But if he choses to work with a contract, the exact same job, he can earn easily around 45-55$ an hour! That makes a gross annual salary of 90-110k a year!

 

Why? Because the employer doesn't have to pay all the stuff he usualy do for an employee since you're not his employee, but a numbered company. Plus he can deduce the amount he gives you as an expense, which accountants prefer fiscally over salaries.

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pleasure helping you!

 

 

I can attest that its very difficult for lots of people to find jobs here, i don't know why. High expectations? Employers low balling?

 

Or is it just too much taxes that the employers have to pay for each new employer.

 

Guys, maybe someone with better HR knowledge could help us clarify what an employer has to pay for each new employer and on the salary volume.

 

I know an employer has to pay its share of RRQ, 1% in education, parental insurance, CSST, EI, and others...

 

How can employer compete with bigger salaries AND lower income taxes? Most probably they can't and loose their edge.

 

On the other hand, our fiscal system in Quebec is geared toward families with children not singles. Our fiscal system is much more intresting when you have kids than when you don't.

 

The problem with that, is that you're more willing to travel and leave your home when you're single than when you're with a family.

 

One of the reasons is simply the mentality when it comes to hire people.

 

Wherever you apply they put in your face the magic number 5, which stands for 5 yrs experience, even though you have very good CV when it comes to education. In here they want you to be custom tailored to the job. If you are missing one thing they will not take a chance on you. In other provinces, HR are much more flexible.

 

Speaking about "private sector " bureaucracy, let me give you an example. In here if they want an accountant with a CA-CMA-CGA title they will demand that not only you have the titles, but also a b.comm in accounting . In ontario or other provinces, whether you have a b.comm in marketing or a bachelor in physics, as long as you have the title they do not care. Why? simply because to start following the courses for these titles, you have to go back to university and do a diploma in which you will take the same accounting courses as the individual that got the bcomm in accounting did.

 

Let us not forget unions who I dislike alot.

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The saddest thing about this, is it makes this board so much less interesting. 2 cranes downtown and a possible metro extension of 1 station on the blue line in the next 20 years. YAWN. With this economy montreal can barely hope to maintain the infrastructure it has, never mind build something new.

 

I check this board because I love this city and continually hope to see something more than a vague proposal be submitted, but seriously, when I look at what is going on in Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto, it makes me want to cry that montreal is barely registering a pulse.

 

At the current rate, I don't think the city is even sustainable as is. Does noone else see a looming crisis?

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At the current rate, I don't think the city is even sustainable as is. Does noone else see a looming crisis?

 

What kind of crisis?

 

I check this board because I love this city and continually hope to see something more than a vague proposal be submitted, but seriously, when I look at what is going on in Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto, it makes me want to cry that montreal is barely registering a pulse.

 

Agreed! The amount of activity in Montréal is nowhere near the canadian average for the other major metropolitan areas!

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