Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Malgré quelques commentaires étranges ("Surely the fare served here is as bleak as the weather in this city" - venant d'un anglais, parler de bleak weather alors que nous avons beaucoup plus d'heures d'ensoleillement, c'est particulier!), et l'article comporte des erreurs de faits ("the Atwater market in Saint-Henri, which has the added attraction of being set in an Art Deco former railway station" - ah oui?), mais le ton est, encore une fois, plutôt flatteur.

 

 

To get a flavour of Montreal just tuck in

 

Canada is hardly famous for its culinary scene. Yet this city is as close as you can get to foodie heaven, says Kate Simon

 

Sunday, 22 June 2008

 

 

Maple syrup: that is the most distinct flavour I'm expecting on my foodie tour of Montreal. Surely the fare served here is as bleak as the weather in this city, where the locals spend the winter months going about their daily business in an underground city of corridors, created to protect against glacial temperatures that can plummet to -40C.

 

Of course, I'm wrong. The food is as extraordinary as the Montrealers' preoccupation with it. I'd like to trace this culinary prowess back to the days when the French ruled the banks of the St Lawrence River, but they were only here for about a century and far more interested in the fur that clothed an animal than its meat.

 

And while the Quebec French have a strong Gallic appreciation of the art of dining, there are more than 80 ethnic cultures represented in this city of four million, with all the attendant flavours that such a mix brings.

 

Breakfast proves the point: the feted Montreal bagel made its way here from Eastern Europe. I eat mine with my guide, Ruby, at St-Viateur Bagel & Café in Le Plateau. It is simmered in honey water and baked fresh in the wood-fired oven and tastes nothing like the usually doughy wheel that sits heavily on my stomach – this one is crisp on the outside, chewy in the centre and sweet-sour on the tongue. It's a flavour to be savoured: "You'll never see a Montrealer eat breakfast on the run," says Ruby, "even if that means being late for work."

 

But I have only a day to get a taste of foodie Montreal, so we move swiftly on. Our next stop is the Jean-Talon market in Little Italy, home to the Italian-Canadians, the city's largest ethnic group. They first came here in the 19th century, then later after the Second World War; and though the community is now spread across the city, some still live in the staircase houses on Jean-Talon and Drolet Streets.

 

These multi-dwelling rowhouses with their exterior iron stairs are a quirky signature architectural style of this city and a sight in themselves, built as a nifty solution to maximising space, containing heat – and raising taxes for the authorities. Ruby tells me Montreal's chilly climate hasn't deterred the Italians from growing grapevines in these backyards – the Mediterranean sun still lives on in their souls.

 

At first sight the Jean-Talon market stalls, laden with workaday fruit and veg, look of little interest to the visitor. Indeed, this is the haunt of locals rather than tourists, who prefer the Atwater market in Saint-Henri, which has the added attraction of being set in an Art Deco former railway station. But Ruby guides me to Le Marché des Saveurs du Quebec on the south side, which is packed with produce from the fertile St Lawrence Valley and beyond – smoked meats, mussels from the Iles de la Madeleine, goat's milk cheeses, and, in a side room, beers from nearby microbreweries and the famed icewines of Niagara. It's the perfect place to pack a picnic for lunch on the run.

 

We find more to tempt us in the boutiques along avenue Laurier Est back in Le Plateau. At Olive & Olives the array of oils could rival any Mediterranean emporium. At Maison Cakao the young owner, not long out of college, offers a modern interpretation of the art of chocolate making, adding inspired ingredients such as Earl Grey tea. While at Le Fromentier & Maître Corbeau we dip downstairs to discover a subterranean hall dedicated to bread and cheese. It also does a roaring trade in deli fare and gourmet prepared meals for that extra-special take-out.

 

Over on rue Laurier Ouest at Les Touilleurs, Ruby gives a real insight into how seriously the Montrealers take their cooking when she shows me a kitchen equipment store that treats its wares as art exhibits. These culinary sculptures provide a good excuse for utensil junkies like me to stand and stare and who will not be able to resist buying a strawberry huller or other such nonsense gadgets as a souvenir.

 

You can linger even longer in Les Touilleurs if you sign up for one of the after-hours cookery demonstrations at its open kitchen, where local chefs show off their skills to small groups of dedicated foodies.

 

I pick up a copy of the Quartiers Gourmands annual guide at the till, which lists shops subscribing to the Slow Food movement and selling an alphabet of foods, from apple tarts to zabaglione. This city knows its food. I'm full and we haven't even tried a drop of maple syrup yet.

 

to-get-a-flavour-of-montreal-just-tuck-in-851852.html

The city's staircase houses provided the authorities with a handy way to raise taxes

 

 

COMPACT FACTS

 

How to get there

 

BA Holidays (0844 493 0758; ba.com) offers four nights at the W Hotel in Montreal from £945 per person in July, including return flights on British Airways from £621 and accommodation only from £324 for the duration.

 

 

Further information

 

Quartiers Gourmands (quartiersgourmands.com). Tourism Montreal (tourism-montreal.org).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Similar Content

    • By mtlurb
      REM de l'est
      Je propose de créer un nouveau fil pour ce projet sorti de nulle part cet après-midi.
      http://journalmetro.com/actualites/montreal/1655839/quebec-allonge-15m-pour-etudier-de-grands-projets-de-transport-collectif/
      "de même que l’extension du Réseau express métropolitain (REM) dans l’emprise du train de l’Est."
    • By ChrisDVD
      Réseau express métropolitain (REM) phase 1

      26 stations / 67 km
      Liens utiles :
      http://www.rem.info/ http://www.nouvlr.com/ https://surlesrails.ca/ https://www.devisubox.com/dv/dv.php5?pgl=Project/interface&dv_pjv_sPjvName=Reseau Express Metropolitain https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRulWJrtFo8KNxr-2FgILhQ https://twitter.com/REMgrandmtl https://www.instagram.com/rem_metro/ https://www.facebook.com/REMgrandmtl/
      TRAINS
      Voiture de type métro léger, électrique Flotte de 212 voitures Alstom Metropolis Rame de 4 voitures en heure de pointe; rame de 2 voitures en hors pointe Capacité de 150 passagers par voiture (assis et debout) Configuration entre deux voitures de type "boa" Alimentation électrique par caténaire Systèmes et conduite automatisée des trains Vitesse maximale de 100 km/h STATIONS / GARES
      Quais d'environ 80 m de long Portes palières sur les quais Accessibles à pied, vélo, par autobus et en voiture Accès universel Ascenseurs, escaliers mécaniques et supports à vélo Wi-Fi offert sur toute la ligne Préposés circulant dans les rames et stations pour information et contrôle ---
      Fil de discussion pour les prolongements hypothétiques:
      https://mtlurb.com/index.php?/topic/15107-rem-expansion-future/
       
       
       
    • By mtlurb
      Rue Saint-Denis : une longue terrasse pour minimiser l'impact des travaux
       
      Mise à jour le mercredi 10 juin 2015 à 20 h 10 HAE
       
      La Ville de Montréal aménagera une terrasse sur la rue Saint-Denis entre les rues Duluth et Marie-Anne afin de maintenir la vie commerciale de la zone touchée par des travaux de réfection majeurs.
       
      La « Grande Terrasse Rouge » sera déployée dès cet été, mais les travaux ne commenceront qu'en septembre 2015 et devraient se terminer en novembre 2016.
       
      D'autres installations « décoratives » et « festives » seront aménagées, notamment en utilisant les fameux cônes orange. Des banderoles seront aussi suspendues dans les airs pour mettre en valeur les commerces de cette rue.
       
      Les espaces de stationnement seront par ailleurs relocalisés et le chantier sera nettoyé quotidiennement. Des passerelles permettront aussi aux piétons de se déplacer entre les commerces et restaurants.
       
      Les travaux permettront de changer le mobilier d'éclairage, de changer les conduites d'aqueduc et d'égout et de reconstruire les trottoirs.
      Le coût total de ces travaux est évalué à 14,4 millions de dollars, dont 4 millions pour les mesures de mitigation.
       
      Cette initiative fait partie du nouveau programme d'aide financière pour réduire les nuisances sur les artères commerciales lors de chantiers de construction dans la métropole.
       
      « Dans le passé, on a entendu qu'il n'y avait pas d'effort de la part de la Ville de Montréal pour aider les commerçants », a expliqué le responsable des Infrastructures de la Ville de Montréal, Lionel Perez.
       
      Il souligne que la plus grande partie des travaux aura lieu en 2016, et qu'en 2015 « ce sera tolérable ».
       
      Des commerçants mitigés
       
      Certains commerçants accueillent positivement ces travaux et croient que les mesures de mitigation seront efficaces. Ce n'est toutefois pas le cas de tous.
       
      « Oui la période des travaux sera difficile, oui ça va être le bordel quelque part sur la rue, ce sera des travaux majeurs, mais avec les mesures de mitigation et dès 2017, ça va être l'occasion de faire renaître cette rue majeure de Montréal », a affirmé le directeur du marketing des ventes des Guides de voyage Ulysse, Olivier Gougeon.
       
      « Je ne sais pas si ça peut permettre de sécuriser le périmètre de chantier, ce n'est pas si pire. Mais je ne pense vraiment pas que ça sera attractif pour les gens. Je pense qu'ils vont encore plus magasiner ailleurs », a répondu Julie Peneau, une vendeuse de la boutique Paris pas cher.
       
      M. Perez affirme de son côté que les commerçants ont été consultés à plus de neuf reprises concernant les travaux et leurs revendications. Selon lui, ils sont « très contents » de voir que la Ville de Montréal s'investit pour attirer des piétons, des clients, mais ils demandent à être rassurés en ce qui concerne le stationnement.
       

       
       

      Vue aérienne de la rue Saint-Denis, où on peut voir la « Grande Terrasse Rouge » qui sera aménagée cet été. Photo : Ville de Montréal
    • By Nameless_1
      La Ville de Montréal dévoile sa programmation hivernale
      26 novembre 2020 | mise à jour le: 26 novembre 2020 à 17:14 temps de lecture: 5 minutesPar:  Zacharie GoudreaultMétro

      De nouvelles places publiques, des sentiers mieux entretenus dans les parcs, des patinoires: la Ville de Montréal a présenté jeudi sa programmation hivernale. Elle espère ainsi inciter les Montréalais à «bouger en sécurité» au cours des prochains mois, tout en stimulant l’achat local.
      La pandémie, combinée aux journées plus courtes et grises qui marquent l’arrivée de l’hiver, ont affecté le moral des citoyens, constate la mairesse de Montréal, Valérie Plante.
      «Il y a cette fatigue qui s’installe et qui est plus difficile pour certaines personnes. C’est un climat qui est assez anxiogène», a-t-elle souligné jeudi après-midi lors d’une conférence de presse à l’hôtel de ville. Elle a alors présenté la programmation hivernale 2020-2021 de la Ville de Montréal.
      ...
      Des stations hivernales
      Ce plan prévoit notamment l’aménagement de 25 stations hivernales dans 17 arrondissements de la métropole au cours des prochaines semaines. Celles-ci prendront forme près d’artères commerciales, voire sur celles-ci, afin d’inciter les Montréalais à aller faire leurs emplettes dans les commerces locaux. Ces petites places publiques seront lumineuses afin d’attirer le regard.
      ...
      Pas pour se réchauffer
      Afin d’éviter que ces petites places publiques deviennent des lieux de rassemblements, aucune programmation d’activités culturelles ou ludiques ne sera mise en place pour ces lieux. Par ailleurs, les stations hivernales ne seront pas chauffées.
      ...
      Plus d’activités dans les grands parcs
      Le programme prévoit par ailleurs la création de nouvelles patinoires, dont une au square Cabot et une seconde au parc Jean-Drapeau. Ce dernier accueillera également une glissade, de même que de nouveaux kilomètres de sentiers pédestres et d’autres dédiés aux fat bike et au ski de fond, entre autres.
      Par ailleurs, bien que la Fête des neiges n’aura pas lieu cette année au parc Jean-Drapeau, plusieurs activités gratuites y seront offertes à partir du 19 décembre, assure la Ville. Cette programmation proposera notamment la découverte d’un sentier historique en raquettes et une exposition extérieure baptisée «Océans».
      ...
      Contrôler l’achalandage
      La Ville entend d’ailleurs s’assurer de surveiller les grands parcs cet hiver pour en limiter l’achalandage. Cet été, l’administration municipale a notamment dû fermer le stationnement du parc du Mont-Royal à plusieurs reprises parce que trop de personnes s’y sont rendues les jours de beau temps.
      «Il y a le mont Royal, mais il y a d’autres endroits. C’est ce que je veux dire aux Montréalais.» -Valérie Plante, mairesse de Montréal
      https://journalmetro.com/actualites/montreal/2583376/la-ville-de-montreal-devoile-sa-programmation-hivernale/
       
×
×
  • Create New...
adblock_message_value
adblock_accept_btn_value