Jump to content

Canada’s cities are about to add millions of new residents. They can’t all drive to work


IluvMTL
 Share

Recommended Posts

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/editorials/article-canadas-cities-are-about-to-add-millions-of-new-residents-they-cant/

EDITORIAL

Canada’s cities are about to add millions of new residents. They can’t all drive to work

EDITORIAL

PUBLISHED JANUARY 3, 2020UPDATED JANUARY 6, 2020

572 COMMENTS

Canada has recently been the fastest growing country in the G7, with a population rising at double the pace of the United States and United Kingdom, and four times that of France and Germany.

According to Statistics Canada’s projections, our country could have 48.8-million people by 2050. And that’s the agency’s “medium” growth projection; under a high-growth scenario, there could soon be 56-million Canadians.

Nearly all of these future residents are going to live in this country’s handful of big cities. That means millions of new urban dwellers – and millions of new commuters.

If we want to raise the quality of life in Canada’s cities, rather than choking on our growth, we will need better planning, so that cities build up more and sprawl out less. As part of that, we need a lot more of the key piece of infrastructure that makes city life possible: mass transit.

There is, unfortunately, a stark contrast between the size of urban Canada’s coming population boom, and the history of delay, denial and underfunding that has marked too many attempts to build badly needed public transit. Our creaking transit systems aren’t up to the demands of the present, let alone the future.

How much bigger are our cities about to become?

‘Quality of life will go down for the average Canadian.’ How readers feel about Canada’s cities adding millions of new residents

Let’s start in British Columbia. The province’s demographers expect that B.C., with 5-million people today, will grow by 1.3-million by 2041. More than three-quarters of those new residents are expected to make their homes in the Lower Mainland, a.k.a. Greater Vancouver.

That’s an extra million people in Canada’s third largest city, in just two decades. It’s the equivalent of the entire population of Prince Edward Island moving to Vancouver, every three years. Before a child born today has graduated university, the Vancouver area will have added nearly as many people as currently live in Saskatchewan.

No, a million more people are not all going to be able to drive to work.

Or consider Alberta. Over the next quarter-century, according to the Alberta Treasury Board’s projections, the province expects to add 2.3-million people – 80 per cent of them in Edmonton, Calgary and the corridor between the two cities. That would mean urban Alberta growing by two Nova Scotias or four Newfoundlands.

STORY CONTINUES BELOW ADVERTISEMENT

In Quebec, the Institut de la statistique projects the province will add 1.1-million people between 2016 and 2041, nearly three-quarters of them in Greater Montreal. The Montreal area already has as many people as Alberta; over two decades, it will add the population of Winnipeg.

And then there’s Toronto. Every day, it becomes more of a global megacity.

According to Ontario’s projections, the Greater Toronto Area will grow from nearly 7-million people to 10.2-million by 2046. Add the horseshoe of growing communities around the GTA, from Niagara to Kitchener-Waterloo to Barrie and, by 2046, what we’ll call the Greater, Greater Toronto Area will have 14.6-million people, up from 10 million today.

That’s an extra 4.6-million residents, more than the population of Alberta, soon to be making their homes within roughly 100 kilometres of the corner of King and Bay streets.

And that’s Ontario’s “medium" growth estimate. There’s also a high-growth scenario. Under that projection, by 2046, the GGTA might have nearly 17-million people. That’s like dropping five Manitobas into the Toronto region, or six Saskatchewans, or one-and-a-half Albertas.

Try to imagine millions of new commuters, all trying to drive to work on the GTA’s already gridlocked highways. It can’t be done.

Canada’s growing population is, in most respects, a success story. The economy will have no trouble creating jobs for all our new citizens, and there’s a good chance the country will end up not just bigger but more dynamic. Boom times and swelling confidence accompanied earlier periods of high population growth, such as during the spike in immigration before the First World War, or the Baby Boom after the Second World War.

But all this growth comes with challenges and downsides. Unless municipalities, provinces and the federal government prepare for our nation’s future as a bigger and more urban country, by planning, funding and actually building public transit, and a lot more of it, the quality of life in Canada’s big cities is at risk.

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Le QC ne grandit pas assez démographiquement. regardez ces chiffres. Au total, on va perdre de précieux points de pourcentage en proportion du ROC. Et du pouvoir qui vient avec une forte représentation.

Il faut arrêter ces conneries de frein à l'immigration. Ou bien on veut rester dans le Canada, pis on s,arrange pour ne pas devenir encore plus minoritaire qu'on l'est, ou bien on se fait un pays, et ce ne sera plus une considération.

La 2e option semblant dans les vapes, reconnaissons alors que la solution passe par l'immigration. ET la natalité, mais ça, ça prend des années à se concrétiser en électeurs et travailleurs (si jamais on réussit à convaincre les gens d'avoir des familles de 4 + enfants!).

Alors, il reste l'immigration.

Donc, que la CAQ ouvre les yeux.

Edited by mtlurb
Langage.
  • Like 8
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 13 minutes, MtlMan a dit :

Le QC ne grandit pas assez démographiquement. regardez ces chiffres. Au total, on va perdre de précieux points de pourcentage en proportion du ROC. Et du pouvoir qui vient avec une forte représentation.

Il faut arrêter ces conneries de frein à l'immigration. Ou bien on veut rester dans le Canada, pis on s,arrange pour ne pas devenir encore plus minoritaire qu'on l'est, ou bien on se fait un pays, et ce ne sera plus une considération.

La 2e option semblant dans les vapes, reconnaissons alors que la solution passe par l'immigration. ET la natalité, mais ça, ça prend des années à se concrétiser en électeurs et travailleurs (si jamais on réussit à convaincre les gens d'avoir des familles de 4 + enfants!).

Alors, il reste l'immigration.

Donc, que la CAQ ouvre les yeux, ou qu'elle décrisse, pcq on va le regretter.

C'est vrai que dans le Canada, on ne grandit pas assez vite si l'on veut garder notre poids démographiques.
Ceci étant, si on compare le Qc à l'ensemble des états et provinces d'Amérique de Nord, notre performance démographique ces dernières années est intéressante. 

Émane d'un post de SSP sur le sujet :

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showpost.php?p=8787469&postcount=13112


State and province population growth, 2018-2019, top 10

Texas: 367,215
Ontario: 248,002
Florida: 233,420
Arizona: 120,693
North Carolina: 106,469
Georgia: 106,292
Quebec: 97,333
Washington: 91,024
Alberta: 70,595
British Columbia: 70,166

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

Le Canada vraiment un problème en infrastructure. On ajoute du monde en masse mais le reste ne suit pas. Pensez-y, combien d’hôpitaux, d’écoles, de station métro, train, ponts, tunnels et autoroutes avons-nous ajoutés depuis que le grand Montréal est passé de 3 à 4 millions? Un tiers de plus? J’en doute fortement. C’est vraiment triste et on est entrain de se tirer dans le pied.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Economy stupid. C est ce qui a fait gagner Bill Clinton. On pourrait rajouter Demography stupid.

Les USA sont ce qu'ils sont a cause de  l'immigration. Trump est entrain de scraper ca. 

Et certains vont dire qu'ils faut viser a etre riche comme un petit pays comme la suisse. (C est un paradis fiscal. N oublions pas ca) 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator
il y a 1 minute, andre md a dit :

Economy stupid. C est ce qui a fait gagner Bill Clinton. On pourrait rajouter Demography stupid.

Les USA sont ce qu'ils sont a cause de  l'immigration. Trump est entrain de scraper ca. 

Et certains vont dire qu'ils faut viser a etre riche comme un petit pays comme la suisse. (C est un paradis fiscal. N oublions pas ca) 

 

La Suisse n’est pas un paradis fiscal, ils ont le secret bancaire (et assez limité). Bref, ils ne sont pas riches qu’à cause de leur système bancaire. 
 

Reste que les pays les plus riches sont petits et très petits en population. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 36 minutes, mtlurb a dit :

La Suisse n’est pas un paradis fiscal, ils ont le secret bancaire (et assez limité). Bref, ils ne sont pas riches qu’à cause de leur système bancaire. 
 

Reste que les pays les plus riches sont petits et très petits en population. 

Yep pays du golfe et autres paradis fiscaux comme monaco jersey , listenchtein, andorre, suisse.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a une heure, mtlurb a dit :

Norvège, Singapour, Ireland et j’en passes sont aussi des petits pays ultra riches et bien gérés. Tu sembles mélanger pleins de choses.  
 

bonne lecture: https://m.dw.com/en/eu-removes-switzerland-uae-from-tax-haven-list/a-50766714

Norvege a du petrole . Irelande est pas loin d etre un paradis fiscal. Apple et google sont en irelande pour les impots merci au fait que irelande fait partie de la communautée europeene. 

Je melange absolument rien. 

Meme si la suisse est enlevé de la liste des paradis fiscaux. Elle en a profité pas mal dans le passé.  

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...
adblock_message_value
adblock_accept_btn_value