Jump to content

How to make air conditioning more sustainable


Malek
 Share

Recommended Posts

How to make air conditioning more sustainable

Better technology could keep people cool—without frying the planet

WHAT is the single most effective way to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions? Go vegetarian? Replant the Amazon? Cycle to work? None of the above. The answer is: make air-conditioners radically better. On one calculation, replacing refrigerants that damage the atmosphere would reduce total greenhouse gases by the equivalent of 90bn tonnes of CO2 by 2050. Making the units more energy-efficient could double that. By contrast, if half the world’s population were to give up meat, it would save 66bn tonnes of CO2. Replanting two-thirds of degraded tropical forests would save 61bn tonnes. A one-third increase in global bicycle journeys would save just 2.3bn tonnes.

Air-conditioning is one of the world’s great overlooked industries. Automobiles and air-conditioners were invented at roughly the same time, and both have had a huge impact on where people live and work. Unlike cars, though, air-conditioners have drawn little criticism for their social impact, emissions or energy efficiency. Most hot countries do not have rules to govern their energy use. There is not even a common English word for “coolth” (the opposite of warmth).

Yet air-conditioning has done more than most things to benefit humankind. Lee Kuan Yew, the first prime minister of Singapore, called it “perhaps one of the signal inventions of history”. It has transformed productivity in the tropics and helped turn southern China into the workshop of the world. In Europe, its spread has pushed down heat-related deaths by a factor of ten since 2003, when 70,000 more people than usual, most of them elderly, died in a heatwave. For children, air-conditioned classrooms and dormitories are associated with better grades at school (see article).

Environmentalists who call air-conditioning “a luxury we cannot afford” have half a point, however. In the next ten years, as many air-conditioners will be installed around the world as were put in between 1902 (when air-conditioning was invented) and 2005. Until energy can be produced without carbon emissions, these extra machines will warm the world. At the moment, therefore, air-conditioners create a vicious cycle. The more the Earth warms, the more people need them. But the more there are, the warmer the world will be.

Too cool for comfort

Cutting the impact of cooling requires three things (beyond turning up the thermostat to make rooms less Arctic). First, air-conditioners must become much more efficient. The most energy-efficient models on the market today consume only about one-third as much electricity as average ones. Minimum energy-performance standards need to be raised, or introduced in countries that lack them altogether, to push the average unit’s performance closer to the standard of the best.

Next, manufacturers should stop using damaging refrigerants. One category of these, hydrofluorocarbons, is over 1,000 times worse than carbon dioxide when it comes to trapping heat in the atmosphere. An international deal to phase out these pollutants, called the Kigali amendment, will come into force in 2019. Foot-draggers should ratify and implement it; America is one country that has not done so.

Last, more could be done to design offices, malls and even cities so they do not need as many air-conditioners in the first place. More buildings should be built with overhanging roofs or balconies for shade, or with natural ventilation. Simply painting roofs white can help keep temperatures down.

Better machines are necessary. But cooling as an overall system needs to be improved if air-conditioning is to fulfil its promise to make people healthier, wealthier and wiser, without too high an environmental cost. Providing indoor sanctuaries of air-conditioned comfort need not come at the expense of an overheating world.

This article appeared in the Leaders section of the print edition under the headline "Rebirth of the cool"

 

Edited by Malek
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dans un autre fil, quand je mentionnais que la lutte contre les automobiles comme seule solution pour réduire les gas à effet de serre était idéologique... ici clairement, les systèmes de AC sont démontrés étant plus dommageables pour l'environnement et avec le plus de gains à aller chercher avec un peu de réglementation... mais bon, personne en parle, ce n'est pas cool. ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tu sautes drastiquement à une conclusion (démontrés étant plus dommageables pour l'environnement et avec le plus de gains à aller chercher) alors que l'article ne compare les systèmes de AC qu'avec 3 autres sources de CO2: mangeurs de viande, arbres replantés en amazonie, augmentation des cyclistes par 30%...

Pourtant, il est démontré depuis longtemps que le numéro un des sources de CO2 (et de loin), c'est l'utilisation des énergies fossiles... C'est clairement là qu'on va avoir les plus grands gains.

2c8cb6fb27c0427cbe5d23edfc6d43e6.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, franktko said:

Tu sautes drastiquement à une conclusion (démontrés étant plus dommageables pour l'environnement et avec le plus de gains à aller chercher) alors que l'article ne compare les systèmes de AC qu'avec 3 autres sources de CO2: mangeurs de viande, arbres replantés en amazonie, augmentation des cyclistes par 30%...

Pourtant, il est démontré depuis longtemps que le numéro un des sources de CO2 (et de loin), c'est l'utilisation des énergies fossiles... C'est clairement là qu'on va avoir les plus grands gains.

2c8cb6fb27c0427cbe5d23edfc6d43e6.png

Je saute pas aux conclusions, dans la plupart des pays l'électricité est produites avec l'énergie fossile... l'auto n'est pas la seule utilisatrice d'énergie fossile :)

Regarde ton graphique, 41% pour l'électricité presque le double du transport.

et le 22% du transport inclus avions, bateaux, trains, camions et autos... (bateaux étant les plus polluants la dernière fois que j'ai vérifié)

Edited by Malek
Link to comment
Share on other sites

100% d'accord avec toi. Mais j'ai l'impression (pas les statistiques) que le morceau de tarte des AC qui doit être compris dans le 41% (bleu) de la tarte de droite doit être beaucoup plus petit que le morceau de tarte des transports individuels qui seraient inclus dans le 22% (orange) des transports.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, franktko said:

100% d'accord avec toi. Mais j'ai l'impression (pas les statistiques) que le morceau de tarte des AC qui doit être compris dans le 41% (bleu) de la tarte de droite doit être beaucoup plus petit que le morceau de tarte des transports individuels qui seraient inclus dans le 22% (orange) des transports.

Je ne comparais pas la grosseur des morceaux de tartes, mais bien le gain qui est possible à faire pour chacune d'elle... 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pour aller plus en détails sur le sujet: https://www.economist.com/international/2018/08/25/air-conditioners-do-great-good-but-at-a-high-environmental-cost

 

Quote

At current rates, Saudi Arabia will be using more energy to run air-conditioners in 2030 than it now exports as oil.

Quote

Air-conditioners produce greenhouse gases in two ways. First, they are responsible for a share of the CO2 generated in the power stations that produce the electricity they run on. At the moment, according to the IEA, it takes about 2,000 TWhs (terawatt hours) of electricity to run all the world’s cooling machines for a year. This produces 4bn tons of CO2, 12% of the total. Without drastic improvements in air-conditioners’ efficiency, the IEA reckons, they will be burning up 6,000 TWhs by 2050.

12% pour les AC à eux seuls comparativement à 22%pour les transports au complet... et ceci pourrais aller jusqu'à 30%+ (si tout le reste est égal).

 

Quote

Second, air-conditioners use so-called “F gases” (such as hydrofluorocarbons, or HFCs) as refrigerants. When—as is common—the machines leak in use or on disposal, these gases escape, doing vast damage. HFCs trap between 1,000 and 9,000 times as much heat as the same amount of CO2, meaning they are much more potent causes of global warming. On this basis, Paul Hawken of Project Drawdown, a think-tank, calculates that improving air-conditioners could do more than anything else to reduce greenhouse gases.

??

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 19 heures, Malek a dit :

Dans un autre fil, quand je mentionnais que la lutte contre les automobiles comme seule solution pour réduire les gas à effet de serre était idéologique... ici clairement, les systèmes de AC sont démontrés étant plus dommageables pour l'environnement et avec le plus de gains à aller chercher avec un peu de réglementation... mais bon, personne en parle, ce n'est pas cool. 

0fc.gif

Pourquoi pas une approche globale des réduction de GES?

EDIT

J'ajouterai aussi que la gestion du parc automobile n'implique pas juste à la lutte aux GES. Effectivement, le transport a un impact sectoriel relativement moindre selon la localité, mais sa gestion concerne également d'autres problématique comme la pollution sonore, la pollution atmosphérique (au delà des GES), la santé publique, la conservation du territoire, la sécurité urbaine, et ironiquement la mobilité.

Mais pour en revenir au point de Malek, j'espère aussi qu'on va cessé de construire au beau milieu déserts (cough* Dubai, Phoenix* cough).

 

Edited by mk.ndrsn
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator
il y a 15 minutes, mk.ndrsn a dit :

0fc.gif

Pourquoi pas une approche globale des réduction de GES?

Exactement la question se pose pourquoi une partie du problème est montée en épingle et le reste littéralement ignoré. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...
adblock_message_value
adblock_accept_btn_value