Recommended Posts

Pinned posts
Le 2019-11-19 à 10:28, ScarletCoral a dit :
  • Déplacement des câbles caténaires
  • Retrait des portiques existants au-dessus des voies ferrées

Je confirme que les caténaires et les portiques ont été retirés cette semaine, entre le viaduc de la commune et le canal Lachine. 👍🏼

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Il y a 19 heures, Chuck-A a dit :

Bien qu'on pouvait s'y attendre en raison des travaux d'excavation du REM dans ce secteur, une 2e découverte archéologique majeure datant du 19e siècle vient d'être réalisée en quelques jours à Montréal... (après celle faite près du Pont Jacques-Cartier et partagée ici par @IluvMTL). :awesome:

Montreal archeologists find remains of 19th century Irish famine victims
The bone fragments were discovered last week by archeologists digging along the path of a future light-rail system in southwestern Montreal.

THE CANADIAN PRESS  |  Updated: November 27, 2019

0519-city-famine-0379.jpg?quality=80&str
Victor Boyle and Fergus Keyes, left, at the Black Rock in Montreal, on Thursday, May 18, 2017. Boyle says the new discovery is a vindication for those have long insisted the site could be the biggest Irish gravesite outside Ireland. DAVE SIDAWAY / MONTREAL GAZETTE FILE PHOTO

MONTREAL — Archeologists digging at the site of a future light-rail station unearthed a piece of Montreal history last week when they uncovered what is believed to have been a cemetery for Irish immigrants who died after fleeing famine in 1847.

The bone fragments of between 12 and 15 people were discovered in a spot about 2.3 metres in diameter that will eventually hold one of the light-rail system’s pillars, according to Elizabeth Boivin, a spokeswoman for the Reseau express metropolitain, or REM.

She said more remains could be discovered in the next few days, since archeologists don’t yet know how deep the graves lie.

While the bones have been sent to a laboratory for analysis, she said archeologists believe they belong to some of the estimated 6,000 immigrants who came across the ocean on overcrowded ships only to die of typhus in fever sheds erected on the banks of the St. Lawrence.

“It was in the context of an epidemic, so there was a public health problem, and the bodies were stacked up, put into coffins, but it wasn’t an organized cemetery as we know it,” she said in a phone interview.

She said pieces of wood, presumably from coffins, have been found with the bones. The remains are in good condition, she said.

Boivin said the REM was aware of the possibility of a graveyard on the site and hosted a blessing in June prior to beginning the dig.

Because the area is bound by railway tracks, archeologists had to work in a confined, cylindrical hole in the ground, where they were lowered by crane. She said the remains will not affect the work on the train system.

The sombre discovery was nevertheless an exciting one for members of Montreal’s Irish community, who have been lobbying for a decade for a memorial park to honour the 1847 famine victims.

Victor Boyle, the co-president of the Irish Memorial Park Foundation, said it lends credence to the historians who say the site could be the biggest Irish grave site outside Ireland.

“It’s a vindication, and it brings back to life the story of 1847, when 6,000 people lost their lives,” he said.

He said other digs carried out in other locations near the site in recent years turned up artifacts but no remains.

The bodies were found near the Black Rock, a three-metre-tall boulder erected by railway workers in 1859 that is believed to be the first-ever memorial to victims of the potato famine.

Fergus Keyes, who co-leads the park effort with Boyle, says an estimated 100,000 people came to Canada in the summer of 1847 aboard overcrowded vessels known as “coffin ships.”

Some 70,000 of them — many sick and dying — landed in Montreal, overwhelming a city whose population numbered only 50,000.

“By September and October of 1847, we know they were running out of coffins and started trenching people,” Keyes said in a phone interview. “At the end of the day, they were digging a trench and throwing in 30 bodies here, there and elsewhere.”

Keyes and Boyle say the project to create a memorial park at the site will be a tribute to both the Irish victims and all the Montrealers risked their lives to nurse and care for them. That includes French-Catholic priests and nuns, British military, Montrealers who adopted orphaned children, First Nations who contributed food and money and Montreal’s mayor at the time, John Easton Mills, who died of typhus after volunteering to nurse the sick.

In a time of polarizing debates over immigration, Keyes says it’s important to remember the response to a group he describes as “the worst immigrants you can imagine.”

“They were poor, they were hungry, they didn’t speak the language, for the most part they were illiterate and on top they brought disease,” he said. “And a bunch of Montrealers of every language and culture went to help them, provide food, provide care, provide comfort.”

Keyes and Boyle hope the bones at the site may provide clues such as the age, gender and cause of death of the victims — and maybe even DNA that could link them to descendants. Eventually, though, they believe it would be best that they be reburied at the site.

“It seems to me unseemly that you would take bones that have been there for more than 100 years and move them somewhere else,” Boyle said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov 27, 2019

https://montrealgazette.com/pmn/news-pmn/canada-news-pmn/montreal-archeologists-find-remains-of-19th-century-irish-famine-victims/wcm/59270255-1a55-4be4-b616-96948b66018e

-----------------------------------------------------

Dans un même ordre d'idée, voici un reportage vidéo de Global News, apparaissant dans un article citant la même nouvelle que The Gazette.

Commemorative Park planned for Black Rock site :
https://globalnews.ca/video/rd/1428065347590/?jwsource=cl

 

 

Il y a 16 heures, ScarletCoral a dit :

La même nouvelle de La Presse Canadienne en français.

La Presse Canadienne ne semble pas au courant que la station  est dans Griffintown ;)

https://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/grand-montreal/201911/27/01-5251487-des-restes-de-refugies-irlandais-trouves-sur-le-site-du-rem.php


« Des archéologues menant des fouilles sur le site d'une future station du train léger sur rail ont déterré un morceau de l'histoire de Montréal, la semaine dernière, en découvrant ce qui aurait possiblement été un cimetière pour les immigrants irlandais décédés après avoir fui la famine en 1847.

Des fragments d'os d'environ 12 à 15 personnes ont été découverts dans une petite zone d'environ 2,3 mètres de diamètre qui accueillera éventuellement l'un des piliers du Réseau express métropolitain (REM), indique la porte-parole Élizabeth Boivin.

L'endroit en question se trouve dans le secteur de Pointe-Saint-Charles, aux environs du Monument irlandais de Montréal.»

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Le 2019-11-28 à 11:50, Chuck-A a dit :
  Le 2019-11-27 à 18:55, ScarletCoral a dit :

La même nouvelle de La Presse Canadienne en français.

La Presse Canadienne ne semble pas au courant que la station  est dans Griffintown ;)

https://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/grand-montreal/201911/27/01-5251487-des-restes-de-refugies-irlandais-trouves-sur-le-site-du-rem.php


« Des archéologues menant des fouilles sur le site d'une future station du train léger sur rail ont déterré un morceau de l'histoire de Montréal, la semaine dernière, en découvrant ce qui aurait possiblement été un cimetière pour les immigrants irlandais décédés après avoir fui la famine en 1847.

Des fragments d'os d'environ 12 à 15 personnes ont été découverts dans une petite zone d'environ 2,3 mètres de diamètre qui accueillera éventuellement l'un des piliers du Réseau express métropolitain (REM), indique la porte-parole Élizabeth Boivin.

L'endroit en question se trouve dans le secteur de Pointe-Saint-Charles, aux environs du Monument irlandais de Montréal.»

 

En savoir plus  

 

Le 2019-11-28 à 11:50, Chuck-A a dit :

 

Un autre article traitant de cette nouvelle, mais avec quelques photos inédites de ces fouilles archéologiques... dont une, à l'intérieur d'un trou qui contiendra un pilier de la structure aérienne du REM.

 

Evidence of mass Irish grave site unearthed during REM light-rail dig
Some 6,000 people died of typhus in the 1840s, and many were buried in unmarked graves

Montreal  |  CBC News · Posted: Nov 30, 2019 7:00 AM ET | Last Updated: November 30

black-rock-bodies.jpg
Archeologists have been sifting through the dirt by hand, lowered into a tube-shaped hole in a basket. The hole will eventually house a pillar to support elevated train tracks. (REM)

During work on a future light-rail station in Pointe-Saint-Charles, archeologists have discovered what could be the bones of Irish immigrants who died after fleeing the Great Famine more than a century-and-a-half ago.

The dig site is a stone's throw from the Black Rock — a  three-metre-tall boulder that, erected in 1859, marks the site where some 6,000 people are buried.

Workers on the Réseau express métropolitain (REM) are digging a hole to to install a concrete support pillar for its trains.

As part of the survey, they sent in a team of archeologists who discovered the bones of 12 to 15 people.

Archeologists were lowered by crane into the ground and have been working to excavate the remains by hand.

bone-fragments.jpg
Bone fragments have been discovered belonging to at least 15 different people believed to have died during the typhus epidemic in the mid-1800s. (REM)

In 1847 some 6,000 Irish famine refugees died of typhus in Pointe-Saint-Charles. It's believed they were buried in a mass grave.

"We made sure that the work here would be done with respect," said Elizabeth Boivin, the REM's deputy director of environment.

Wood that may be from coffins has also been unearthed in the dig.

basket.jpg
The yellow, cylindrical basket fits perfectly into the hole so experts can carefully comb through the dirt in search of bone fragments and other artifacts. (CBC)

Before crews began digging in June, a ceremony was held in collaboration with the Irish community.

Largest Irish grave site outside of Ireland

Because the dig affects less than one per cent of the site, the project will leave many other graves undisturbed, Boivin said.

Still, finding evidence of as many as 15 bodies in such a small area demonstrates just how many people are buried there — giving credence to the claim that it is the largest Irish grave site outside of Ireland, said Fergus Keyes.

He has been co-leading a push for a memorial park near the site for the last decade. 

fergus-keyes.jpg
Fergus Keyes has been pushing for a memorial park near the Black Rock site for a decade. ( Simon Nakonechny/CBC)

"We always knew that, in that area, 6,000 Irish were buried," Keyes said. "Nobody has ever dug into that earth since the mid-1800s, as far as we know."

The hope is that lab tests will provide more information about who they were, how they lived and how they died, Keyes said.

Then they'll be put back close to where they where found.

"We will re-inter them in a very nice, proper ceremony at some point near the Black Rock," he said. 

With files from Simon Nakonechny

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/irish-grave-site-montreal-black-rock-1.5379413

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Il y a 10 heures, louisleonardo a dit :

Ces découvertes donnent encore plus de poids à la proposition d'une station nommée en l'honneur de la communauté irlandaise.

Si la toponymie pour les stations du REM est en lien avec la géographie comme c'est le cas avec les stations de métro et que la 2e station du bassin Peel est dans ce coin-là, il y a la rue des Irlandais près du Black Rock.

 

 

image.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Il y a 22 heures, ScarletCoral a dit :

Si la toponymie pour les stations du REM est en lien avec la géographie comme c'est le cas avec les stations de métro et que la 2e station du bassin Peel est dans ce coin-là, il y a la rue des Irlandais près du Black Rock.

 

 

image.png

Je pense qu'une station nommée « Saint-Patrick » ou encore mieux « des Irlandais » dans ce secteur ferait grandement consensus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • By ScarletCoral
      Discussion générale sur l'illumination des édifices et infrastructures de Montréal 
      En passant, Montréal n'a pas de plan lumière à l'exception du Quartier des spectacles et du Vieux-Montréal

      Voir ici un reportage au Téléjournal 18h  de Nabi-Alexandre Chartier (Ça fait toujours drôle de voir à Radio-Canada depuis ses débuts à Musique Plus!!)
       
    • By ScarletCoral
      215-225, rue Murray

       
       
      Selon le registre foncier, le 215 (1853750) appartient à  9289-9202 QUÉBEC INC. depuis 2015
      et le 225-227 (1 853 747), rue Murray appartient à Maxime Lachance, promoteur du Yoo. Aurait-il acheter le terrain adjacent? 
      Ces terrains semblent être sur celui convoité pour le projet Union... 
       
       
    • By ScarletCoral
      Yoo Montréal Phase 2


       
       
    • By IluvMTL
      http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/portal/page?_pageid=7317,79803639&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL
      Autorisations et dérogations
      Procédures d'urbanisme
      Selon les caractéristiques particulières ou la nature de votre projet, il peut être nécessaire de recourir à des mesures d’exception d’urbanisme ou de se conformer à certaines dispositions règlementaires, pour que votre projet puisse voir le jour. Voici ci-dessous les conditions et les procédures qui se rapportent aux différents outils règlementaires en place (description de la procédure, délais de traitement, critères d’évaluation, étapes d’analyse du projet, etc.). Notez que celles-ci s’ajoutent aux conditions et procédures également prévues dans le cadre des demandes régulières de permis et d’autorisations.
      Article 89
      La procédure en vertu de l’article 89 de la Charte de la Ville de Montréal vise la réalisation d’un projet d’envergure ou de nature exceptionnelle (équipement collectif ou institutionnel, grandes infrastructures, immeuble patrimonial classé ou cité,…), même s’il déroge à la règlementation d’urbanisme de l’arrondissement.
      Charte de la Ville de Montréal – article 89.1
      Fiche sur l’article 89
      Formulaire de demande d'approbation d'un projet
      Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox et Apple Safari peuvent afficher les fichiers PDF incorrectement. Pour passer du lecteur PDF intégré à un autre lecteur PDF, suivez les instructions »
      Avis de recevabilité pour une démolition
      La procédure des avis de recevabilité d’une démolition permet d’obtenir l’avis de la Division de l’urbanisme et du développement économique concernant la recevabilité de la démolition d’un immeuble. Cet avis permettra par la suite d’orienter le demandeur à savoir s’il est judicieux de déposer une demande formelle de démolition d’un immeuble.
      Fiche sur l’avis de recevabilité pour une démolition
      Formulaire de demande d'un avis de recevabilité
      Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox et Apple Safari peuvent afficher les fichiers PDF incorrectement. Pour passer du lecteur PDF intégré à un autre lecteur PDF, suivez les instructions »
      Règlement sur la démolition d’immeubles
      Avis préliminaire
      La procédure d’avis préliminaire permet d’évaluer la recevabilité d’un projet qui déroge à la réglementation d’urbanisme de l’arrondissement ou d'un projet soumis à la procédure de Titre VIII du Règlement d'urbanisme. L’avis préliminaire permet également d’obtenir un avis du comité consultatif d’urbanisme (CCU).
      Fiche sur l’avis préliminaire
      Formulaire de demande d’avis préliminaire
      Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox et Apple Safari peuvent afficher les fichiers PDF incorrectement. Pour passer du lecteur PDF intégré à un autre lecteur PDF, suivez les instructions »
      Autorisation du ministère de la Culture et des Communications (MCC)
      L'arrondissement de Ville-Marie agit à titre de guichet unique pour toute demande d'autorisation du ministère de la Culture et des Communications (MCC) sur son territoire. Ainsi, toute demande doit obligatoirement transiger par l'arrondissement.
      Formulaire de demande d’autorisation du MCC
      Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox et Apple Safari peuvent afficher les fichiers PDF incorrectement. Pour passer du lecteur PDF intégré à un autre lecteur PDF, suivez les instructions »
       Loi sur le patrimoine culturel (chapitre P-9.002)
      Conversion en copropriété divise
      Dans l'objectif de protéger le parc de logements locatifs dans l'arrondissement de Ville-Marie, il est interdit de convertir un immeuble de logements en copropriété divise. Toutefois, une procédure permet, à certaines conditions, de déroger à cette interdiction.
      Fiche sur la conversion en copropriété divise
      Formulaire de demande d'autorisation de conversion en copropriété divise
      Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox et Apple Safari peuvent afficher les fichiers PDF incorrectement. Pour passer du lecteur PDF intégré à un autre lecteur PDF, suivez les instructions »
      Règlement sur la conversion des immeubles en copropriété divise (C-11) 
      Démolition d'immeubles
      La procédure de démolition vise à protéger les immeubles pouvant présenter un intérêt patrimonial et à encadrer la réutilisation du sol dégagé tout en permettant au Comité d'étude des demandes de démolition (CEDD) d'imposer toute condition à cet effet (délai de réalisation des travaux, garantie monétaire, etc).
      Fiche sur la démolition d'immeubles
      Formulaire de certificat d'autorisation de démolition
      Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox et Apple Safari peuvent afficher les fichiers PDF incorrectement. Pour passer du lecteur PDF intégré à un autre lecteur PDF, suivez les instructions »
      Règlement sur la démolition d'immeubles (CA-24-215)
      Dérogation mineure
      La procédure de dérogation mineure vise à permettre la réalisation de travaux projetés qui dérogent de façon mineure à des dispositions précises de la réglementation d'urbanisme de l'arrondissement en raison de contraintes particulières propres à la propriété visée. La procédure de dérogation mineure est donc une mesure d'exception.
      Fiche sur la dérogation mineure
      Formulaire de demande d'autorisation d'une dérogation mineure
      Règlement sur les dérogations mineures (CA-24-008)
      Projet particulier de construction, de modification ou d’occupation d’un immeuble (PPCMOI)
      Surhauteur
      La procédure de surhauteur vise à permettre la construction d’une tour dépassant la hauteur maximale prescrite, située en retrait du plan de façade principal. Celle-ci est évaluée de façon à assurer son intégration dans la silhouette distinctive du centre-ville et pour atténuer certains impacts, notamment l’ensoleillement, les vents, les vues depuis et vers le mont Royal ainsi que la circulation véhiculaire.
      Fiche sur la surhauteur
      Formulaire de demande d’autorisation d’une surhauteur
      Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox et Apple Safari peuvent afficher les fichiers PDF incorrectement. Pour passer du lecteur PDF intégré à un autre lecteur PDF, suivez les instructions »
      Règlement d’urbanisme de Ville-Marie (articles 34 à 42)
      Révision de projet 
      La procédure de révision de projet vise à assurer une architecture et des aménagements de qualité qui s’intègrent adéquatement à leur milieu d’insertion. Cette approche plus souple d’évaluation qualitative, plutôt que normative des projets, favorise la recherche de solutions novatrices dans un échange ouvert entre l’arrondissement et le demandeur.
      Fiche sur la révision du projet
      Règlement d’urbanisme de Ville-Marie (articles 99 à 127.24 et 710 à 716)
      Usage conditionnel
      La procédure d’usage conditionnel introduit une souplesse dans la réglementation permettant d’implanter, à la suite d’une procédure d’évaluation, des usages compatibles avec le milieu (résidentiels, commerciaux, industriels ou communautaires) sans qu’il soit nécessaire de modifier la réglementation à chaque fois.
      Fiche sur l’usage conditionnel
      Formulaire de demande d’autorisation d’un usage conditionnel
      Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox et Apple Safari peuvent afficher les fichiers PDF incorrectement. Pour passer du lecteur PDF intégré à un autre lecteur PDF, suivez les instructions »
      Règlement d’urbanisme de Ville-Marie (articles 308 à 329 et 135-136)
      Tarifs
      Règlement sur les tarifs - exercice financier 2019
    • By ScarletCoral
      Valérie Mahaut et son équipe de l'Université de Montréal ont recensé tous les anciens cours d'eau et plans d 'eau de l'île de Montréal. 
      On peut consulter les cartes ici : https://papyrus.bib.umontreal.ca/xmlui/handle/1866/16311 

      Très intéressant pour expliquer pourquoi les fondations de certains projets prennent du temps à construire.