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Montreal "Desert Commercial"


IluvMTL
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Faut pas perdre de vue aussi que la banlieue est elle-même un désert commercial (dans le sens à mon avis réel du terme, contrairement à l'article: proximité et accessibilité), avec un effet trou de beigne provoquée par la concentration de certains centres comme le DIX30 et le Carrefour.

 

La question est surtout de se demander pourquoi certains quartiers n'arrivent pas à créer une dynamique commerciale locale intéressante. Et pourquoi d'autres y arrivent. C'est à mon avis une des plus grande faiblesse de notre région métropolitaine, l'échec à rapprocher le commerce de la population, et de continuer de penser que ce problème est insoluble avec des projets commerciaux toujours plus centralisateurs et ultra-régionaux.

Edited by vincethewipet
précision
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Au centre-ville de Toronto on retrouve plusiers grandes chaînes de magasin qui se trouvent seulement dans le banlieue de Montréal. Pourquoi Montréal est si distinct ?

Car à Toronto le cadre bâtit au centre-ville a été démolli pour faire place à des grattes-ciels avec des basilaires où se retrouvent des grandes surfaces. Ce phénomène commence à Montréal avec les épiceries dans les condos, et comme le Winners dans Griffintown.

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There's a difference between Toronto and Montreal.

 

In Toronto the traffic has been stupidly bad for DECADES due to suburban buildup. That -in part- led to a massive demand and subsequent buildup of residential buildings in the downtown area. Downtown Toronto - which used to be a barren wasteland at nights and on the weekend - now has the immediate downtown population to support parallel commerce.

 

Conversely, areas like Mississauga, Brampton, Richmond Hill and Oshawa had their own commercial "revolutions" at the same time as people chose to shop locally rather than brave the infamous Toronto traffic. Toronto now has a balance between suburban and urban commercial decisions. Ask someone from one of those suburbs if they regularly go to the Eaton Center or Bloor Street to do their shopping and you'll get a good "LOL!" Will someone who lives downtown travel out to Square One to buy a basic t-shirt? Of course not. Will someone from Mississauga head to the Eaton Center to buy a basic t-shirt? No.

 

In Montreal we are now catching up to the same reality. Due to the traffic headaches caused by suburban sprawl alongside the need to actually get into downtown to work, we are seeing large residential developments move forward (Griffintown, Bell Centre area, etc.). Under no circumstance will that lessen traffic but it will bring an influx of residents into downtown which will also help sustain businesses that cater to those same residents.

 

Sure the constant construction headaches contribute to closures and a lack of excitement for off-islanders to say "let's go downtown!" but under no circumstance should it be blamed for every problem. I live in Vaudreuil now and I'll still brave hours of traffic if it means visiting spectacular restaurants like HVOR, Impasto, Liverpool House, Lemeac, etc. or a place like the Old Port. Many I know are the same: downtown still and will always hold that spark of awesomeness that'll keep us going BUT I'll never set foot downtown for mediocrity. What I see is a thinning of the herd so to speak; the mediocrity is being cut out but the places that offer something unique and special are thriving.

 

/ end rant

Edited by SKYMTL
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There's a difference between Toronto and Montreal.

 

In Toronto the traffic has been stupidly bad for DECADES due to suburban buildup. That -in part- led to a massive demand and subsequent buildup of residential buildings in the downtown area. Downtown Toronto - which used to be a barren wasteland at nights and on the weekend - now has the immediate downtown population to support parallel commerce.

 

Conversely, areas like Mississauga, Brampton, Richmond Hill and Oshawa had their own commercial "revolutions" at the same time as people chose to shop locally rather than brave the infamous Toronto traffic. Toronto now has a balance between suburban and urban commercial decisions. Ask someone from one of those suburbs if they regularly go to the Eaton Center or Bloor Street to do their shopping and you'll get a good "LOL!" Will someone who lives downtown travel out to Square One to buy a basic t-shirt? Of course not. Will someone from Mississauga head to the Eaton Center to buy a basic t-shirt? No.

 

In Montreal we are now catching up to the same reality. Due to the traffic headaches caused by suburban sprawl alongside the need to actually get into downtown to work, we are seeing large residential developments move forward (Griffintown, Bell Centre area, etc.). Under no circumstance will that lessen traffic but it will bring an influx of residents into downtown which will also help sustain businesses that cater to those same residents.

 

Sure the constant construction headaches contribute to closures and a lack of excitement for off-islanders to say "let's go downtown!" but under no circumstance should it be blamed for every problem. I live in Vaudreuil now and I'll still brave hours of traffic if it means visiting spectacular restaurants like HVOR, Impasto, Liverpool House, Lemeac, etc. or a place like the Old Port. Many I know are the same: downtown still and will always hold that spark of awesomeness that'll keep us going BUT I'll never set foot downtown for mediocrity. What I see is a thinning of the herd so to speak; the mediocrity is being cut out but the places that offer something unique and special are thriving.

 

/ end rant

 

That was a good rant, thank you.

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In downtow Toronto nothing is perfect with the mall basilaire at the base of condo towers. An exemple the Aura Tower on Yonge street. The 4 th tallest tower in Toronto. The shopping center at the base is quite desert. Maybe we could learn from them. To not repeating the same mistakes.

 

‘A world-class address’: Nowhere else will you find such desolation and gloom as in the solitude of The Shops at Aura | National Post

 

PressReader.com - Connecting People Through News

Edited by andre md
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