Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Celine Cooper: Before Montreal can thrive, it needs to educate itself

 

Celine CooperCELINE COOPER, SPECIAL TO MONTREAL GAZETTE

More from Celine Cooper, Special to Montreal Gazette

Published on: July 10, 2016 | Last Updated: July 10, 2016 2:00 PM EDT

 

The city of Montreal is reflected in the St. Lawrence River.

Montreal is a city with so much potential. If only we could unlock it. PAUL CHIASSON / THE CANADIAN PRESS

 

By now the story is familiar. It’s called the Great Montreal Paradox.

 

It goes something like this: Montreal has everything it needs to become one of North America’s most dynamic and successful cities. Yet, we continue to lag behind other North American cities on a vast range of economic indicators including job creation, employment rates, GDP growth and population growth.

 

And here we go again. Last month, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) released a socio-economic study called Montréal: Métropole de Talent. The study looks at Montreal’s relative performance within a constellation of 18 city members of the OECD (Manchester, Boston, Dublin, Stockholm and Toronto, for example).

 

It concludes that Montreal has the necessary DNA to thrive as a major hub for innovation and economic development at both national and international levels. It lauds our enviable quality of life. We are bursting at the seams with potential.

 

Yet, the findings echo much of what we’ve read in other studies focused on Montreal, including the 2014 BMO and Boston Consulting Group study Building a New Momentum in Montreal and the 2014 Institut du Québec research group study. Despite our strategic advantages, Montreal seems chronically incapable of translating our potential into performance. The unemployment rate in Montreal is higher than other North American cities, and immigrants have higher levels of unemployment here than in other parts of Canada. We are hampered by a low birthrate, population growth and immigrant retention, and high interprovincial outflow.

 

Study after study has indicated that one of Montreal’s biggest challenges is attracting and retaining people. This isn’t just a Montreal problem, but a Quebec one. A recent report by the Fraser Institute showed that Quebec has the highest cumulative out-migration of any province in Canada, having been drained of more than half a million of our citizens to other provinces between 1971 and 2015.

 

The question, as always, is why?

 

Here’s the message I get from reading between the lines of the OECD report: Maybe — just maybe — Montreal has been a little too accepting of mediocrity.

 

The report suggests in relation to our North American counterparts, Montreal’s economy is marked by low levels of competence and low levels of productivity. We have too many sectors with poor-quality jobs that demand few qualifications.

 

The OECD suggests that to create opportunities and prospects for young people and fully capitalize on the potential of immigration, Montreal needs to break a damaging cycle of low qualifications and an over-abundance of low-quality jobs.

 

Let’s sum this up: Montreal needs people. But people need a reason to stay in Montreal. Cities around the globe are competing for the world’s best and brightest. Highly qualified people are looking for jobs where they can put their skills, talent and ambition to use. They don’t want to run the risk of finding themselves in jobs that don’t offer much in terms of pay, advancement and professional growth. Or, worse, unemployed.

 

Among the many recommendations, the OECD report suggests that solving this problem in Montreal requires strategic partnerships among all sectors of our economy. Universities, they argue, need to be directly implicated in the development of the local economy. On this point, I couldn’t agree more.

 

With access to six universities and 12 CÉGEPs, Montreal has the highest proportion of post-secondary students of all major cities in North America. In 2013, it was ranked the best city in the world in terms of overall return on investment for foreign undergraduate students by an Economist Intelligence Unit survey.

 

And yet the proportion of the population with a bachelor’s or graduate degree is among the lowest in Canada — Montreal is at 29.6 percent, lagging behind Toronto and Vancouver at 36.7 and 34.1 percent respectively. As far as I’m concerned, our university ecosystem is our best bet for getting beyond the Great Montreal Paradox.

 

[email protected]

 

Twitter.com/CooperCeline

 

Sent from my SM-T330NU using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 36
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Il y a aussi le climat, quelque chose qu'on ne peut changer. Il faut aimer l'hiver, ou plutôt, il faut être capable de le faire année après année. Plusieurs quittent pour un meilleur climat, même s'ils aiment la ville. C'est normal de pas avoir un immigration interprovinciale positive puisque le reste du Canada est anglophone, et qu'ici, c'est le français qui prime. Comme avec le Canadien, on veut pas le meilleur coach possible, on veut le meilleur coach francophone, ce qui nous prive de plusieurs bons entraineurs. Il faut assumer, on est à un crossroads, soit on y va all in en français ou soit on y va all in en faveur de l'économie.

Edited by vivreenrégion
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Montréal is unique , a city that has preserved it's origins . It is Français first and the really unique large city in Canada and the USA that can boast that . What can we doo better , well we can become the largest bilingual and trilingual hub in North America . No matter our origins , meme si nous sommes Québécois de souche , nous pouvions devenir la ville la plus internationale en Amérique du Nord pour les affaires .

A Montréal nous pouvons faire des affaires international dans peut importe quel langue . Français au Québec et tous les langues pour les affaires extérieur. Je recommande sans prétention Montréal la ville mondiale unique , sans frontière pour le commerce les affaires dans tous les langues . Devons le ville unique dans les Amériques pour les affaires , le savoir faire et l'avenir des Québécois ce trouve dans ce que je vous dit .

Montréal International ouvert sur notre survie et a s'enrichir collectivement . Montréal la ville pour faire des affaires partout sur la planète dans tous les langues et en Français pour les affaires au Québec.

Edited by greenlobster
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Montréal is unique , a city that has preserved it's origins . It is Français first and the really unique large city in Canada and the USA that can boast that . What can we doo better , well we can become the largest bilingual and trilingual hub in North America . No matter our origins , meme si nous sommes Québécois de souche , nous pouvions devenir la ville la plus internationale en Amérique du Nord pour les affaires .

A Montréal nous pouvons faire des affaires international dans peut importe quel langue . Français au Québec et tous les langues pour les affaires extérieur. Je recommande sans prétention Montréal la ville mondiale unique , sans frontière pour le commerce les affaires dans tous les langues . Devons le ville unique dans les Amériques pour les affaires , le savoir faire et l'avenir des Québécois ce trouve dans ce que je vous dit .

Montréal International ouvert sur notre survie et a s'enrichir collectivement . Montréal la ville pour faire des affaires partout sur la planète dans tous les langues et en Français pour les affaires au Québec.

C'est du français ou du chinois ce que je lis là?! Lol sans rancune, je tiens à souligner ton effort à écrire dans la langue de molière.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Montréal is unique , a city that has preserved it's origins . It is Français first and the really unique large city in Canada and the USA that can boast that . What can we doo better , well we can become the largest bilingual and trilingual hub in North America . No matter our origins , meme si nous sommes Québécois de souche , nous pouvions devenir la ville la plus internationale en Amérique du Nord pour les affaires .

A Montréal nous pouvons faire des affaires international dans peut importe quel langue . Français au Québec et tous les langues pour les affaires extérieur. Je recommande sans prétention Montréal la ville mondiale unique , sans frontière pour le commerce les affaires dans tous les langues . Devons le ville unique dans les Amériques pour les affaires , le savoir faire et l'avenir des Québécois ce trouve dans ce que je vous dit .

Montréal International ouvert sur notre survie et a s'enrichir collectivement . Montréal la ville pour faire des affaires partout sur la planète dans tous les langues et en Français pour les affaires au Québec.

 

Positif! J'aime!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You know, if the French character rebutes some, so be it! We will not be sorry for our roots. That would be pathetic and counter-productive. And winter, well, the ONLY solution we have is to try as much we can to make it unique and liveable. Let's stop whining, it won't change a bit the fact that it is and will be (however less and less harsh if we follow the climate change route).

 

For the rest (retaining talents, make immigrants work in good jobs, etc.) it is certainly achievable to fix those problems with good policies (I hope metropolis status will help in that objective) and hard work by everyone involved in the city (admin, business commnunity, civil society, artists and creators, etc.).

 

The hardest thing to obtain is that kind of great potential. We HAVE it! So, it shouldn't be that difficult to create the conditions to make it flourish, if we put all our brains, muscles and ingenuity together.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Les parents immigrants poussent beaucoup plus leur enfants que les quebecois de souche a continuer leurs études. Un des facteurs est que les enfants d'immigrants reste plus longtemps chez leur parents.

 

Quand tu quitte le maison a 18 ou 19 ans et que tu commence a travailler l'ecole deviens ta derniere priorité.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Toronto tente deja de faire ca avec le francais ils poussent tres fort tout les affiches sont en francais et anglais. Et les sites web aussi. Par contre en pratique tu arrive pas a te faire servir en francais. Juste a arriver a l'aeroport Pearson et passer la douane et on constate toute de suite.

 

Tourisme montreal a un site bilingue, Tourisme Toronto a un site web en plusieurs langues.

 

Pour ce qui est de ville bilingue en amerique du nord je crois que montreal n'est pas seule Miami est pas mal bilingue Anglais - Espagnol je l'ai constaté en allant la-bas. On pourrait dire la meme chose de Los Angeles et meme New York.

Edited by andre md
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Au fait, je crois que le faible "niveau d'éducation" est une raison qui fait en sorte que Montréal est une ville créative et différente. Il y a également moins de pauvreté à Montréal qu'à Toronto. Donc avant de voir le gros signe de $, il faut avoir plus de métriques que le PIB et l'éducation. De toute façon, un haut niveau de scolarité qui n'est pas utilisé coûte encore plus cher à la société.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share




×
×
  • Create New...
adblock_message_value
adblock_accept_btn_value