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Korean Airlines ICN-YUL June 13


FlyboyMTL
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It could be f1 freighters

 

It wasn't freighters. Those were passenger planes.

 

KAL9987 YUL-GYD (B77W reg. HL8274)

KAL9985 YUL-GYD (B77W reg. HL8218)

 

Freighters with the actual cars fly out from YMX. 3 flights flew out on June 13.

 

CLX775 YMX-LUX-GYD (B748 reg. LX-VCF)

AZG7174 YMX-HHN-GYD (B744 reg. 4K-SW888)

AZG7176 YMX-HHN-GYD (B748 reg. VQ-BVB)

 

 

They are carrying F1 personel and staff to Baku. There was a second one too.

 

Correct.

Edited by thenoflyzone
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