Recommended Posts

Pinned posts

Réseau express métropolitain (REM)

REM.png

26 stations / 67 km

http://www.rem.info/
http://www.nouvlr.com/
https://surlesrails.ca/

TRAINS

- Voiture de type métro léger, électrique
- Flotte d'environ 240 voitures à la mise en service
- Rame de 4 voitures en heure de pointe; rame de 2 voitures en hors pointe
- Capacité de 150 passagers par voiture (assis et debout)
- Configuration entre deux voitures de type "boa"
- Alimentation électrique par caténaire
- Systèmes et conduite automatisée des trains
- Vitesse maximale de 100 km/h

STATIONS / GARES

- Quais d'environ 80 m de long
- Portes palières sur les quais
- Accessibles à pied, vélo, par autobus et en voiture
- Accès universel
- Ascenseurs, escaliers mécaniques et supports à vélo
- Wi-Fi offert sur toute la ligne
- Préposés circulant dans les rames et stations pour information et contrôle

---
Fil de discussion pour les prolongements hypothétiques:
https://mtlurb.com/index.php?/topic/15107-rem-expansion-future/

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

La voie réservée est déjà en fonction sur Thimens, la signalisation a été faite au courant de l'automne. L'utilisation de cet axe pour les navettes en attendant le REM est à peu près la seule explication logique compte tenu qu'un bon bout ne voit jamais de traffic (surtout entre Henri Bourassa et Bégin)

Le trajet à partir de Roxboro sera donc vraisemblablement Gouin-Pittfield- HB- Thimens- Marcel Laurin- Édouard Laurin, avec une quasi- exclusivité du terminus CV sud pour les navettes de la ligne DM.
À partir de DM et de Laval, ce sera surement via la 13 pour compléter le trajet de la même manière.

Je ne serais pas surpris de voir quelques bus arriver à Du Collège aussi en heure de pointe pour atténuer le volume à Côte Vertu.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Il y a 19 heures, vincethewipet a dit :

Les gens vont installer une poupée gonflable sur le siège à côté pour ne pas payer.

Et si ta passagère a un flat, t'appelles-tu la CAA?:rotfl:

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Ce serait idéal si les gens abandonnait leur voiture et se rendait à une station de REM à pied, en vélo ou en autobus, mais ce n'est pas réaliste pour un grand nombre de personnes.  Ces personnes vont préférer continuer à aller au centre-ville en voiture plutôt que de marcher 10-15 minutes sur une rue (quand il n'y a pas de trottoir) mal déglacée pour ensuite attendre un autobus (possiblement bondé) qui va les mener à la station de REM.  Je préfère voir des automobilistes faire the last mile de chez eux jusqu'à une station de REM en voiture et le reste du trajet en REM, que de tout faire en voiture.  Si on dit que le trajet en voiture ne représente que 10 ou 15 % du trajet, c'est quand même une victoire à 85 ou 90 %.  Je vais la prendre cette victoire.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
3 hours ago, ScarletCoral said:

https://montrealgazette.com/opinion/columnists/martin-patriquin-parking-shouldnt-be-a-priority-at-rem-stations

Martin Patriquin: Parking shouldn't be a priority at REM stations

Parking lots take up a lot of space — and space next to REM stations is far more valuable as residential or commercial property.

Updated: February 6, 2019

On the outer reaches of Montreal, around dining room tables and in their dens, a cold chill has taken hold of suburbanites. Resentment is simmering, pearls are being tightly clutched. A greater power is threatening their sacred right to park their cars, and they are mad.

Their ire is related to the 67-kilometre light rail train network known as the REM currently being built on and around the island. This anger might be charitably called ironic; by connecting south, west and northwest suburbs to both the Trudeau airport and downtown Montreal, the rail system is possibly the greatest gift to the suburbs since the invention of the two-car garage.

But no matter. In Brossard, some 300 people turned out to voice their displeasure at how the suburb’s three new REM stations won’t come with additional parking spots. On the West Island, the good citizens of Pierrefonds-Roxboro are raging over the cancellation of a planned 2,000-spot parking lot, with mayor Jim Beis accusing the Plante administration of wanting to “bring an element of the inner-city” to his burgh’s hallowed postal code.

Similar pangs are being felt in Kirkland, Pointe-Claire and Deux-Montagnes, with some residents saying they will stubbornly stay in their cars should the CDPQ Infra, the arm of the pension behemoth Caisee de dépôt that is overseeing the project, not meet their parking requirements. “We need, we need, we need those parking spots,” one Pointe-Claire resident told Global News this week.

The reason behind all this noise and froth: in developing the province’s biggest public transportation initiative in the last half century, CDPQ Infra has, not surprisingly, put the emphasis on … public transportation.

Yes, there will be parking facilities — 14 of them, to be exact. But there will also be bus terminals and platforms to facilitate access to the REM stations. They will be near-ubiquitous — 17 platforms at the Pointe-Claire station alone — and they come at the expense of car traffic, meaning many will have to take the bus to the train.

There are a number of very good reasons to favour bus transport. By their very nature, parking lots would take up an inordinate amount of space around each station — space that, given its proximity to the REM, would be far more valuable as residential or commercial property.

One example: the $1.3-billion Solar project in Brossard, which will be home to 2,600 housing units and 1.2 million square feet of retail and commercial space all anchored around one of the suburb’s three REM stations. Suffice to say, it is far more valuable as a development than as a temporary holding space for two depreciating tons of metal, rubber, glass and plastic.

As well, creating more supply only spurs further demand, meaning large parking lots in, say, Kirkland would become car-friendly beachheads for residents from even farther-flung suburbs.

They’ll be asking for more parking in a few years, just as they are asking for more roads right now.

To hear the cries of certain suburbanites, taking the bus is akin to walking through Dante’s Inferno.

To be fair to the them, asking for a parking lot-free REM is a bit like demanding an addict to kick junk. Like all North American suburbs, those encircling Montreal were built to accommodate the car. In suburbia, this convenience became a necessity, which has hardened into an unalloyed sense of entitlement. You will pry that steering wheel from their cold, dead hands.

We all suffer from it. Transportation accounts for 23 per cent of the country’s greenhouse gas emissions. Eliminating emissions from freight transportation is a difficult task, mostly because the country doesn’t yet have the infrastructure to go carbon-free. By contrast, curbing commuter traffic constitutes the low hanging fruit of the overall plan to reduce the country’s carbon footprint. Doing so is a main raison d’être of the REM system. The goal shouldn’t be undermined by the privileged few who still want to drive.

My comments towards the article:

 

While parking lots may indeed not be the ideal land use, it's important to recognize that there is still a certain need for it simply because the existing services and infrastructure remain insufficient to accomodate the needs of many..

While, I do agree that there is definitely a need to reduce the importance being given to cars in suburbs, I think the author of the article isn't taking into consideration that it simply isn't realistic for everyone. I've taken public transit my whole life and don't intend to get a car for as long as I possibly can, but I do understand and acknowledge that it isn't a feasible option for a lot of people in suburbs. It might be in 2067, but it definitely won't be in 2021 or 2022 even with the REM. There will still be a lot of work to be done despite the noticeable improvements that'll come.

The great thing about parking lots is, with future public transit infrastructure development throughout a city's network, their uses can be changed consequently. It would have been complicated if that parking lot instead offered low-density housing. That's right, residential and commercial isn't always the immediate solution... It really depends how it's implemented. Low-rise residential or commercial owners don't have the obligation to sell their land simply because the city eventually wants to redevelop to offer higher density. Parking lots are easier to deal with in that respect

I don't think people -want- to drive, they either can't or haven't envisioned a way to live without it yet. The author has to take into account the former

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Il y a 18 heures, ScarletCoral a dit :

To hear the cries of certain suburbanites, taking the bus is akin to walking through Dante’s Inferno.

To be fair to the them, asking for a parking lot-free REM is a bit like demanding an addict to kick junk. Like all North American suburbs, those encircling Montreal were built to accommodate the car. In suburbia, this convenience became a necessity, which has hardened into an unalloyed sense of entitlement. You will pry that steering wheel from their cold, dead hands.

Ouain. Un peu fort.

Comme les messages plus haut l'ont dit c'est un peu plus complexe que ça. Donner aux banlieusards le moyen de se déplacer facilement, rapidement et de façon sécuriataire sans la voiture, et là on pourra vraiment faire pression pour réduire la présence des autos.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
il y a 46 minutes, Miska a dit :

Donner aux banlieusards le moyen de se déplacer facilement, rapidement et de façon sécuriataire sans la voiture, et là on pourra vraiment faire pression pour réduire la présence des autos.

Sauf que l'aménagement et l'espace pour l'un et l'autre est parfois en contradiction. Quand on pense tout pour la voiture, on rend les rues dangereuses et inhospitalières pour les piétons.

On entend certains banlieusards dirent que tout ce qu'à besoin un piéton, c'est un petit trottoir d'un mètre de large n'importe où, n'importe comment, tout le reste n'est que dogmatique, que guerre à la voiture, pas besoin de retirer le moindre morceau d'asphalte aux automobiles… Et au final personne ne marche dans ces environnements (voir la majorité de nos banlieues). Pendant ce temps, là où l'effort a été fait pour rendre l'expérience plus agréable (souvent au détriment d'un peu de capacité routière), le transfert modal est réel et calculé.

Pour faire un trottoir agréable, faut une certaine largeur, faut du mobilier urbain, des arbres, des intersections sécuritaires. Ça prend de la place, et il est difficile de rendre un endroit agréable quand il est en bordure d'une quasi-autoroute. Faut repenser l'utilisation de l'espace public. Ça retire de la capacité routière, l'espace public n'est pas infini.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

La voiture autonome va rendre les stationnements inutiles, la voiture pouvant aller se stationner toute seule ailleurs. D'ici l'ouverture du REM, qui sait où la technologie sera rendue? C'est peut-être un des pari que CDPQi a pris.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
il y a 9 minutes, TurboLed a dit :

La voiture autonome va rendre les stationnements inutiles, la voiture pouvant aller se stationner toute seule ailleurs. D'ici l'ouverture du REM, qui sait où la technologie sera rendue? C'est peut-être un des pari que CDPQi a pris.

Je doute fortement que la technologie soit aussi avancée d’ici 2023, soit l’ouverture totale du REM.

Faut pas oublier que nous ne sommes même pas encore capables d’avoir plus que 3% de véhicules électriques dans notre parc automobile. 

CDPQi a décidé de prendre cette décision dans une optique de développement durable et suite à la demande de certaines municipalités.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

C'est pas du tout-pour-tout quand même. Il y a encore des places de stationnements, seulement moins qu'avant. Il faut autant offrir une -plus petite- offre que remodéliser progressivement le quartier (Unisolar par exemple) un peu comme les évolutions à Laval qui re-modélise progressivement de leur "centre-ville"

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Invité
Répondre à ce sujet…

×   Vous avez collé du contenu avec mise en forme.   Restaurer la mise en forme

  Seulement 75 émoticônes maximum sont autorisées.

×   Votre lien a été automatiquement intégré.   Afficher plutôt comme un lien

×   Votre contenu précédent a été rétabli.   Vider l’éditeur

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Contenu similaire

    • Par p_xavier
      https://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2019/01/04/en-route-vers-une-prochaine-station 
      Quelques erreurs dans le texte mais ça résume bien les projets STM en 2019.
       
    • Par ProposMontréal
      Webcam: http://www.nouveauchamplain.ca/chantier/chantier-en-direct/
       
      Discussion portant sur le nouveau Pont Champlain.
    • Par greenlobster
      The reason of this  new subect is in english is that it concerns a company not from France . One of the top 10 ten Europen IT companies will build a new IT megacenter for North America in, notre belle ville de Montréal, annonce debut 2019. 1600 empois sur 5 ans .Ils construrions une centre de donnéesNord Americain de plus de 400 millions , oui dans lz region de Montréal. 
    • Par p_xavier
      Des transports collectifs en mouvement…
      La grande réforme dans l’organisation des transports collectifs de la région métropolitaine de Montréal s’est concrétisée le 1er  juin 2017, alors que deux nouvelles entités ont pris la relève de l’Agence métropolitaine de transport (AMT) et des autorités organisatrices de transport (AOT) des couronnes nord et sud :
      L’Autorité régionale de transport métropolitain (ARTM) est responsable de la planification, de l’organisation et du financement des services de transports collectifs pour la grande région métropolitaine de Montréal. Elle favorise l’intégration des services entre les différents modes de transport. Le Réseau de transport métropolitain (connu sous exo) est responsable sous mandat de l’ARTM, d’exploiter sur son territoire les services de transport collectif réguliers par autobus (couronnes nord et sud) et par trains de banlieue, incluant le transport adapté pour les personnes handicapées). Le Réseau de transport de Longueuil (RTL), la Société de transport de Laval (STL) et la Société de transport de Montréal (STM), continuent de fournir leurs services respectifs, sous le mandat de l’ARTM.