Recommended Posts

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/good-architecture-pays-french-expert

 

<header class="entry-header" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 15px; line-height: 24px; font-family: BentonSans-Regular, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">The good, the bad and the ugly: French expert assesses Montreal architecture

 

f640ffc98d7d4cdaf80e0c289df39724?s=33&d=identicon&r=GMARIAN SCOTT, MONTREAL GAZETTE

More from Marian Scott, Montreal Gazette

Published on: April 13, 2016 | Last Updated: April 13, 2016 7:00 AM EDT

</header><figure class="align-none wp-caption post-img" id="post-783124media-783124" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="http://wpmedia.montrealgazette.com/2016/04/montreal-que-april-6-2016-emmanuel-caille-is-an-edito.jpeg?quality=55&strip=all&w=840&h=630&crop=1" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); float: none;">montreal-que-april-6-2016-emmanuel-caille-is-an-edito.jpeg?quality=55&strip=all&w=840&h=630&crop=1<figcaption class="wp-caption-text" itemprop="description" style="margin: -1px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);">

Emmanuel Calle, editor of the French architecture magazine "d'a", at the Canadian Centre for Architecture. Caille shared his thoughts on Montreal's architecture. MARIE-FRANCE COALLIER

</figcaption></figure>SHAREADJUSTCOMMENTPRINT

What would an international expert think of Montreal’s recent architecture?

To find out, the Montreal Gazette took French architecture critic Emmanuel Caille on a walking tour of downtown and Griffintown. He also visited the $52.6-million indoor soccer stadium that opened last year in the St-Michel district.

Caille, the editor of the Paris-based architecture magazine “d’a”, was in town to take part in a panel discussion last week on architectural criticism, organized by the Maison de l’architecture du Québec and the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC).

Caille’s verdict on our fair city ranged from a thumbs-up for the pricey new soccer stadium to shocked incredulity over a new hotel annex to the Mount Stephen Club, a historic mansion at 1440 Drummond St.

<figure id="attachment_783141" class="wp-caption post-img size_this_image_test align-center" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px auto 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); float: none; max-width: 100%; width: 1000px;">montreal-que-march-22-2016-a-view-of-the-future-mount.jpeg?quality=55&strip=all<figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);">

The Mount Stephen Club. DARIO AYALA / MONTREAL GAZETTE

</figcaption></figure>Built from 1880-83 for Lord Mount Stephen, the first president of the Canadian Pacific Railway, it has been in the news recently after suffering structural damage during construction of the annex.

Caille, an architect as well as an editor, did not comment on the structural problems, but he did give a visual assessment of the hotel addition, an 11-storey cement-panel structure tucked behind the mansion.

“It’s quite brutal in the city,” he said.

From de Maisonneuve Blvd., the hotel addition presents a view of three blank walls with a shed-style roof.

“It’s astonishing. It’s bizarre,” he said.

Caille was also perplexed by the front façade, dotted with small windows of different sizes.

“What is not obvious is what relationship there is between this building and the mansion. I don’t see any,” he added.

The hotel addition shows why projects should not be conceived in isolation, Caille said. City planners should have put forward a vision for the entire block, which includes an outdoor parking lot on de la Montagne St. that would have made a better site for a high rise, he said. Interesting alleyways and outdoor spaces could have been included, he said.

“Everybody is turning their back to one another,” he said of how the different properties on the block don’t relate to each other.

At the Ritz-Carlton hotel on Sherbrooke St., Caille said a glass condo addition completed in 2013 is a good example of how to update a historic building for modern use.

But he criticized white PVC windows on the hotel’s Sherbrooke St. façade for their thick frames and mullions, which don’t suit the building.

“That’s horrible,” he said. “Windows are the eyes of a building. When women use an eye pencil to emphasize their eyes, it changes everything.”

<figure id="attachment_783158" class="wp-caption post-img size_this_image_test align-center" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px auto 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); float: none; max-width: 100%; width: 997px;">montreal-que-october-28-2015-construction-workers-wor1-e1460503968692.jpeg?quality=55&strip=all<figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);">

Construction workers work on the District Griffin condo project in Griffintown. DARIO AYALA / MONTREAL GAZETTE

</figcaption></figure>In Griffintown, Caille was unimpressed by the banal architecture of condo towers that have sprouted in recent years in the former industrial district, which is undergoing rapid transformation.

But the former Dow Planetarium at 1000 St-Jacques St. W. caught his eye. Built in 1966, it closed in 2011. The city turned it over to the Université du Québec’s École de technologie supérieure in 2013. ÉTS announced it would transform the building into a “creativity hub” but so far the building has sat vacant.

Caille said the domed landmark has great potential to be recycled for a new vocation.

“When a building is dirty and dilapidated, people don’t see its beauty. You have to see the beauty underneath the neglect,” he said.

Today there is a consensus that older heritage buildings should be preserved but it’s still difficult to rally public opinion behind buildings from more recent eras, like the 1960s, Caille said.

<figure id="attachment_783147" class="wp-caption post-img size_this_image_test align-center" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px auto 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); float: none; max-width: 100%; width: 1000px;">montreal-que-december-7-2015-a-view-of-deloitte-build-e1460504548745.jpeg?quality=55&strip=all<figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);">

The 26-storey Deloitte Tower between Windsor Station and the Bell Centre. DARIO AYALA / MONTREAL GAZETTE

</figcaption></figure>The Deloitte Tower, a new 26-storey glass office tower between the Bell Centre and Windsor Station, is nothing to write home about, in Caille’s opinion.

“It’s developer architecture,” he said. “There’s nothing interesting about it.”

Built by developer Cadillac Fairview, it is part of the $2-billion, nine-tower Quad Windsor project.

That includes the 50-storey Tour des Canadiens, which will be Montreal’s tallest condo tower for about a year, until the even taller nearby L’Avenue tower is completed.

Most people don’t notice the difference between good and bad architecture when a building is new, Caille said.

But over time, the defects of bad buildings grow increasingly obvious, while the good ones become beloved monuments, he said.

“People go to New York to see the architecture of the 1920s and 30s,” he said, referring to landmarks like the 1931 Empire State Building and 1928 Chrysler Building.

“Good architecture always pays off in the long term.”

Unfortunately, much development is driven by short-term considerations, he said.

While a developer can walk away from a mediocre building once it’s sold, city-dwellers are stuck with it, he said.

“For him, it’s no problem. But for the city, it’s a tragedy,” he said.

“Today’s architecture is tomorrow’s heritage,” he noted.

Caille is a strong proponent of architectural competitions, which he sees as a way to seek out the best talents and ideas.

“It forces people to think and it shows that for every problem, there are many solutions. It’s a way of accessing brainpower,” he said.

<figure id="attachment_783196" class="wp-caption post-img size_this_image_test align-center" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px auto 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); float: none; max-width: 100%; width: 1000px;">montreal-que-march-9-2016-kids-arrive-at-the-the-new-e1460505138457.jpeg?quality=55&strip=all<figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);">

Kids arrive at the the new soccer complex at the Complexe environnemental St-Michel. PHIL CARPENTER /MONTREAL GAZETTE

</figcaption></figure>The St-Michel soccer stadium has been criticized for its high price tag but Caille hailed it as an example of excellent design.

The ecological building designed by Saucier & Perrotte has three glass walls overlooking a park in the St-Michel environmental complex.

Caille said the stadium could be a catalyst for improvements in the hardscrabble north-end neighbourhood.

During Tuesday’s panel discussion, Paul Goldberger, a Pulitzer Prize-winning former architecture critic for the New York Times and the New Yorker, said that unlike other types of journalists, architectural critics rarely have an immediate impact on public opinion.

“Architectural criticism must take a very long view,” he said.

“One learns to think of one’s influence as more gradual, as shifting tastes and judgment over time.”

Goldberger, author of books including Why Architecture Matters, published in 2009, has written that the critic’s job is not to push for a particular architectural style, but rather to advocate for the best work possible.

He said the time in his career when architectural criticism enjoyed greatest prominence was following Sept. 11, 2001, during discussions over the rebuilding of the World Trade Center.

“It was a time when architectural criticism really was, I think, front and centre in the public discourse,” he said.

“There it was so clear that an issue of architecture was intimately connected to significant world affairs and one did not have to struggle to help people understand the connection between architecture and the rest of the world,” said Goldberger, who now writes for Vanity Fair and teaches at The New School in New York.

In a 2011 review of the new World Trade Center for the New Yorker, Goldberger said the design by architect Daniel Libeskind “struck a careful balance between commemorating the lives lost and reestablishing the life of the site itself.”

The panel discussion followed the awarding of two $1,000 prizes to young writers for architectural writing on the topic of libraries. The winning entries by Marie-Pier Bourret-Lafleur and Kristen Smith will be published respectively in Argus and Canadian Architect magazines.

[email protected]

Twitter.com/JMarianScott

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Intéressant de constater que ce qui est commenté ici dans cet article, a déjà été dit et constaté à plusieurs reprises par la grande majorité de nos membres sur ce forum. Donc rien de vraiment nouveau. J'ajouterais que l'architecture comme la plupart des arts en général, fait appel aux émotions, en créant un dialogue plus ou moins réussi entre l'auteur et le public en général. Nous arrivons donc au même constat et réclamons depuis longtemps, une meilleure qualité dans le design des nouvelles constructions et bien sûr davantage de rigueur et de professionnalisme, en ce qui a trait aux exigences de la Ville.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • By Fortier
      Discussion sur la Ligne Rose, proposée par Projet Montréal

      Discussion sur la proposition de Projet Montréal en terme d'expansion du transport en commun à Montréal.
      Entente de principe datant du 2019-06-26 pour le financement de la section ouest de la Ligne Rose, de Lachine vers le centre-ville. Les détails de cette extension ne sont pas connus.
    • By acpnc
      Publié le 24 septembre 2018 à 00h00 | Mis à jour à 06h25
      http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/grand-montreal/201809/23/01-5197673-trottinettes-en-libre-service-des-projets-bloques-par-quebec.php
      Trottinettes en libre-service: des projets bloqués par Québec?
      Lime, filiale du géant Google qui exploite des trottinettes électriques en libre-service dans plus d'une centaine de villes, a récemment annoncé vouloir étendre ses activités au Canada.
      ARCHIVES REUTERS
      Pierre-André Normandin
      La Presse Roulera, roulera pas? L'arrivée des trottinettes électriques en libre-service au centre-ville de Montréal risque de se faire attendre. Les règles mises en place par Québec pour encadrer leur arrivée semblent leur fermer la porte jusqu'en 2021.
      Lime, filiale du géant Google qui exploite des trottinettes électriques en libre-service dans plus d'une centaine de villes, a récemment annoncé vouloir étendre ses activités au Canada. L'entreprise, qui espère lancer ses activités au centre-ville de Montréal cet automne, risque toutefois de se buter aux règles imposées par Québec.
      Le ministère des Transports a dévoilé cet été les règles qui encadreront un projet-pilote de trois ans afin d'évaluer ce nouveau mode de transport. Celles-ci prévoient notamment que les usagers devront obligatoirement avoir au moins 18 ans et porter un casque.
      Formation obligatoire
       
      Certains critères rendent difficile l'utilisation de trottinettes électroniques en libre-service, à l'instar de BIXI. Québec impose que tous les usagers suivent «une formation appropriée à la conduite d'une trottinette électrique». Les usagers devront d'ailleurs se promener en tout temps avec une attestation pour démontrer aux policiers qu'ils ont suivi cette formation, qui doit être tant théorique que pratique.
      Responsable de gérer le projet-pilote, la Société de l'assurance automobile du Québec (SAAQ) précise que les systèmes en libre-service ne sont pas interdits, mais que ceux-ci ne cadrent pas avec les objectifs. 
      «L'objectif du projet-pilote est d'abord de recueillir de l'information en vue de mettre à jour la réglementation», affirme Sophie Roy, porte-parole de la SAAQ.
      Pour y arriver, la SAAQ dit vouloir retrouver tous les utilisateurs afin de les questionner sur leur expérience : manoeuvrabilité, sentiment de sécurité, pertinence des équipements imposés (comme le casque), utilité réelle de ce moyen de déplacement, etc.
      La SAAQ juge ainsi qu'une «expérience sporadique» n'est pas appropriée. «Une location ponctuelle à un touriste, par exemple, ne rencontre pas ces objectifs», poursuit Sophie Roy.
      Des critères sévères
      Les règles adoptées par Québec semblent également disqualifier la trottinette électrique utilisée par Lime, celle-ci ne respectant pas plusieurs critères édictés. Pour être autorisés, les véhicules doivent être dotés de roues ayant un diamètre d'un minimum de 25 cm. Celles de l'entreprise américaine font 20 cm. Les véhicules doivent être équipés de freins indépendants aux deux roues. Le bolide du géant américain mise sur un frein moteur et un sur roue. Les trottinettes doivent être munies de feux de changement de direction tant à l'avant (jaune ou blanc) qu'à l'arrière (jaune ou rouge). Le véhicule de Lime n'en a pas.
      Surprise par les critères imposés par Québec, Lime dit toujours espérer lancer son système en libre-service dans le centre-ville de Montréal cet automne. L'entreprise américaine compte répondre à l'appel de projets de la SAAQ et recevoir une réponse positive, même si sa trottinette ne respecte pas certains critères.
      Le dernier mot revient au ministre, qui peut autoriser une entreprise à mener un projet-pilote même s'il ne respecte pas tous les critères édictés cet été. Pour l'heure, aucune entreprise n'a reçu d'autorisation à mener un projet-pilote.
      Un fabricant québécois se lance
      Si l'incertitude plane sur les trottinettes électriques en libre-service à Montréal, un fabricant québécois de ce type de bolide doit annoncer sous peu comment il compte participer au projet-pilote de Québec. Plutôt que la location à court terme, la firme Concept GeeBee, de Sherbrooke, misera sur des entreprises qui fourniront des trottinettes électriques à leurs employés.
      L'entreprise avait été pressentie par des hôtels qui souhaitaient offrir des trottinettes en location à court terme à leurs clients, mais GeeBee constate que les règles de Québec ne permettent pas ce type de service pour le moment.
      «Ce n'est pas à 100% ce qu'on espérait, mais les contraintes ne sont pas insurmontables. On espère qu'après une année de projet-pilote, il y aura des adaptations», indique Sabine Le Névannau, présidente de GeeBee.
      «Ce qu'on désire, c'est démontrer que ce type de mobilité durable a sa place, que ça répond aux besoins de mobilité.»
      La trottinette de l'entreprise québécoise répond à pratiquement tous les critères imposés par Québec. Ses roues ont 43 cm de diamètre (58 cm en incluant le pneu) et sont dotées de freins indépendants à l'avant et à l'arrière. Son moteur de 500 watts lui permet de rouler jusqu'à 32 km/h. Ses 39 kg respectent aussi la limite de poids imposée par Québec. Seuls les clignotants manquent à GeeBee, mais l'entreprise dit travailler à une solution.
       
    • By paulmtl
      Désolé je sais pas où  mettre cette discussion.  Test de sol cette après midi dans le même secteur Viger coin Saint-Dominique .

    • By mtlurb
      Prolongement de la ligne bleue vers l'est

      Prolongement de la ligne bleue vers l'est. La mise en chantier est prévue en 2022, pour une livraison en 2026. Connexion avec le SRB Pie-IX, stationnement de 1200 places aux Galeries d'Anjou. Coût évalué à 3.9 milliards de dollars.
      Le projet en chiffres 
      5 nouvelles stations de métro accessibles, pour une longueur de tunnel de 5,8 km 2 terminus d’autobus et 1 stationnement incitatif de 1 200 places 1 tunnel piétonnier souterrain assurant le lien avec le futur SRB Pie-IX Plusieurs infrastructures opérationnelles : 6 structures auxiliaires renfermant des équipements nécessaires à l’exploitation, 1 poste de district, 1 garage de métro, 1 centre d’attachement hébergeant des véhicules d’entretien des voies et 1 centre de service pour l’entretien des infrastructures Budget estimé de 3,9 G$ Échéancier préliminaire
      Début 2019 : début de la conception des plans et devis.  Printemps 2019 : approbation du mode de réalisation, du plan budgétaire et de l’envergure du projet. Fin 2019 : début de travaux préparatoires sur certains sites. Début 2020 : démarrage des processus de changement de zonage et de consultations publiques.   2021 : dépôt du dossier d’affaires, lancement de la construction des nouvelles infrastructures. 2026 : inauguration du nouveau tronçon.