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Ottawa's share of immigrants in decline as newcomers look to Montreal and the West


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Andrew Duffy, Ottawa Citizen, Ottawa Citizen 03.17.2015

 

Ottawa’s share of new immigrants continues to decline as newcomers increasingly opt for the economic opportunities of Western Canada or the cultural diversity of Montreal.

 

A Statistics Canada study released Wednesday reveals that the percentage of immigrants who cited Ottawa as their intended destination has dropped to 2.4 per cent in 2012 from 3.4 per cent in 2000.

 

It means that the actual number of immigrants settling in Ottawa has gone down even as Canada welcomed more newcomers. Annual immigration to Canada rose to 280,700 in 2012 from 227,500 in 2000.

 

“The recession hit Ontario pretty hard and it’s normal that immigrants don’t want to go to someplace where economic conditions are not as good,” said Gilles Grenier, a University of Ottawa economics professor who specializes in labour market and immigration issues.

 

The Statistics Canada research paper, Changes in the Regional Distribution of New Immigrants to Canada, examines the country’s evolving settlement pattern.

 

It shows that new immigrants have started to look beyond Toronto and Vancouver to destinations such as Calgary, Edmonton, Winnipeg and Saskatchewan, where — at least until the recent crash in oil prices — economies have been booming.

 

Montreal, already a major destination, has also seen its share of newcomers increase substantially to 18.1 per cent in 2012.

 

Meanwhile, Toronto, which attracted almost half (48.4 per cent) of all new immigrants in 2000, saw its share of newcomers fall to 30 per cent in 2012. Still, that city remains the country’s biggest magnet for immigrants.

 

StatsCan analysts suggested that the new settlement pattern reflects changes in regional economic activity and employment. “In short, labour market conditions were better in Western Canada than they were in the rest of the country,” the report concluded.

 

That more newcomers were settling outside of Toronto and Vancouver was also a reflection of Canada’s revised immigration system. Provincial nominee programs (PNPs) allow provinces to select and nominate immigrants to meet their own economic goals and growth targets.

 

“Over the 2000s, the PNPs considerably increased the number of immigrants going to destinations that previously received few immigrants,” the study found.

 

The percentage of immigrants arriving in Canada as provincial nominees increased to 13 per cent in 2010 from one per cent in 2000.

 

The program has been particularly successful at attracting immigrants to Manitoba, Saskatchewan, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

 

StatsCan analysts said the distribution of newcomers within Canada has also been affected by shifts in the country’s immigration sources. In the late 1990s, most of Canada’s immigrants came from China and India, and they tended to settle in Toronto and Vancouver. By 2010, however, the Philippines was the biggest source of Canadian immigrants, and they have settled in cities across the country, the report said.

 

Montreal’s growth as a destination city was driven by increased immigration from Africa, South America, Central America and the Caribbean.

 

Gilles Grenier said the study shows that Canada’s immigration system is maturing.

 

“It’s a good thing that immigrants disperse in Canada,” he said. “Because Ontario, for many years, was the main destination for immigrants in Canada, especially Toronto, where almost half the population is foreign-born.”

 

The recent drop in oil prices, however, could cause immigration patterns to shift again, Grenier warned, as immigrants chase new job opportunities.

 

 

BY THE NUMBERS

 

48.4: Percentage of new immigrants who wanted to settle in Toronto in 2000

 

30: Percentage of new immigrants who wanted to settle in Toronto in 2012

 

5.5: Average unemployment rate in Toronto in 2000

 

9.2: Average unemployment rate in Toronto in 2010

 

21.3: Percentage of Canadian immigrants that came from China in 2000

 

12.8: Percentage of Canadian immigrants that came from China in 2010

 

14: Percentage of Canadian immigrants that arrived from the Philippines in 2010

 

Source: http://www.montrealgazette.com/News/ottawa/Ottawa+share+immigrants+decline+newcomers+look+Montreal/10902540/story.html

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Les immigrants veulent de moins en moins immigrer a Toronto . Trop cher pour te loger. Meme chose pour Vancouver. Les provinces de l'ouest comme alberta , saskatchewan et manitoba on des jobs et rapport revenu - depenses c'est encore acceptable. Montreal a legerement plus de chomage mais ca coute moins cher en general . Pour les sud americains aussi montreal leur parait plus attrayante dommage que le gouvernement du quebec ne pousse pas plus pour en attirer. lls s'integre tres bien meme si ils restent tres attachés a leurs cultures.

Andrew Duffy, Ottawa Citizen, Ottawa Citizen 03.17.2015

 

Ottawa’s share of new immigrants continues to decline as newcomers increasingly opt for the economic opportunities of Western Canada or the cultural diversity of Montreal.

 

A Statistics Canada study released Wednesday reveals that the percentage of immigrants who cited Ottawa as their intended destination has dropped to 2.4 per cent in 2012 from 3.4 per cent in 2000.

 

It means that the actual number of immigrants settling in Ottawa has gone down even as Canada welcomed more newcomers. Annual immigration to Canada rose to 280,700 in 2012 from 227,500 in 2000.

 

“The recession hit Ontario pretty hard and it’s normal that immigrants don’t want to go to someplace where economic conditions are not as good,” said Gilles Grenier, a University of Ottawa economics professor who specializes in labour market and immigration issues.

 

The Statistics Canada research paper, Changes in the Regional Distribution of New Immigrants to Canada, examines the country’s evolving settlement pattern.

 

It shows that new immigrants have started to look beyond Toronto and Vancouver to destinations such as Calgary, Edmonton, Winnipeg and Saskatchewan, where — at least until the recent crash in oil prices — economies have been booming.

 

Montreal, already a major destination, has also seen its share of newcomers increase substantially to 18.1 per cent in 2012.

 

Meanwhile, Toronto, which attracted almost half (48.4 per cent) of all new immigrants in 2000, saw its share of newcomers fall to 30 per cent in 2012. Still, that city remains the country’s biggest magnet for immigrants.

 

StatsCan analysts suggested that the new settlement pattern reflects changes in regional economic activity and employment. “In short, labour market conditions were better in Western Canada than they were in the rest of the country,” the report concluded.

 

That more newcomers were settling outside of Toronto and Vancouver was also a reflection of Canada’s revised immigration system. Provincial nominee programs (PNPs) allow provinces to select and nominate immigrants to meet their own economic goals and growth targets.

 

“Over the 2000s, the PNPs considerably increased the number of immigrants going to destinations that previously received few immigrants,” the study found.

 

The percentage of immigrants arriving in Canada as provincial nominees increased to 13 per cent in 2010 from one per cent in 2000.

 

The program has been particularly successful at attracting immigrants to Manitoba, Saskatchewan, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

 

StatsCan analysts said the distribution of newcomers within Canada has also been affected by shifts in the country’s immigration sources. In the late 1990s, most of Canada’s immigrants came from China and India, and they tended to settle in Toronto and Vancouver. By 2010, however, the Philippines was the biggest source of Canadian immigrants, and they have settled in cities across the country, the report said.

 

Montreal’s growth as a destination city was driven by increased immigration from Africa, South America, Central America and the Caribbean.

 

Gilles Grenier said the study shows that Canada’s immigration system is maturing.

 

“It’s a good thing that immigrants disperse in Canada,” he said. “Because Ontario, for many years, was the main destination for immigrants in Canada, especially Toronto, where almost half the population is foreign-born.”

 

The recent drop in oil prices, however, could cause immigration patterns to shift again, Grenier warned, as immigrants chase new job opportunities.

 

 

BY THE NUMBERS

 

48.4: Percentage of new immigrants who wanted to settle in Toronto in 2000

 

30: Percentage of new immigrants who wanted to settle in Toronto in 2012

 

5.5: Average unemployment rate in Toronto in 2000

 

9.2: Average unemployment rate in Toronto in 2010

 

21.3: Percentage of Canadian immigrants that came from China in 2000

 

12.8: Percentage of Canadian immigrants that came from China in 2010

 

14: Percentage of Canadian immigrants that arrived from the Philippines in 2010

 

Source: http://www.montrealgazette.com/News/ottawa/Ottawa+share+immigrants+decline+newcomers+look+Montreal/10902540/story.html

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Tant mieux pour Montréal!

 

Mais méfions-nous d'un certain backlash anti-immigration. Avec l'abruti Jean Tremblay à Saguenay, ou PKP qui écoeure le monde avec sa peur de perdre "1 circonscription par année à cause des immigrants", ou le virage identitaire de la CAQ qui veut renvoyer chez eux les immigrants qui passent un test de français! (Calvaire : des Québécois pur laine l'échoueraient ben avant!!!), bref, il y a un vent défavorable pour augmenter les quotas (ce que j'aimerais beaucoup).

 

Il va falloir que les Libéraux règlent le maudit dossier des valeurs (charte, whatever) de manière acceptable pour fermer la trappe aux fatigants de l'obsession identitaire.:stirthepot:

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Tant mieux pour Montréal!

 

Mais méfions-nous d'un certain backlash anti-immigration. Avec l'abruti Jean Tremblay à Saguenay, ou PKP qui écoeure le monde avec sa peur de perdre "1 circonscription par année à cause des immigrants", ou le virage identitaire de la CAQ qui veut renvoyer chez eux les immigrants qui passent un test de français! (Calvaire : des Québécois pur laine l'échoueraient ben avant!!!), bref, il y a un vent défavorable pour augmenter les quotas (ce que j'aimerais beaucoup).

 

Il va falloir que les Libéraux règlent le maudit dossier des valeurs (charte, whatever) de manière acceptable pour fermer la trappe aux fatigants de l'obsession identitaire.:stirthepot:

 

:thumbsup::highfive:

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Je ne sais meme pas pourquoi le gouvernement du quebec ne pense pas a aller dans des pays comme le portugal, l'espagne, l'italie. Je peux parle pour l'espagne je connais une tonne d'espagnols qui serait volontier pour immigrer ici. D'ailleurs beaucoup d'espagnols et de portugais immigrent en argentine , au mexique, au bresil,meme en angola.Ils sont tres éduqués plus que la moyenne nord americaine. Meme si ils ne parlent pas francais c'est tres facile pour eux de l'apprendre ils parlent des langues latines tres similaire a la notre. Surtout les italiens c'est une langue tellement proche du francais. De plus ils peuvent s'integrer facilement a notre société ils ont une mentalité plus proche de la notre. Désolé pour ceux pour qui la religion prime.

on peut augmenter les quotas, mais j'aimerais que ce soit pour ceux qui viennent d'Europe. même s'ils ne parlent pas un mot français.

 

st

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PKP pas possible de l'entendre ce personnage. Comme d'ailleurs une bonne gang de frustrés du PQ et de la CAQ. Mon pere immigrant dont la langue maternelle n'est pas le francais aurait beaucoup de lecon de francais a donner aux purs laine .

Tant mieux pour Montréal!

 

Mais méfions-nous d'un certain backlash anti-immigration. Avec l'abruti Jean Tremblay à Saguenay, ou PKP qui écoeure le monde avec sa peur de perdre "1 circonscription par année à cause des immigrants", ou le virage identitaire de la CAQ qui veut renvoyer chez eux les immigrants qui passent un test de français! (Calvaire : des Québécois pur laine l'échoueraient ben avant!!!), bref, il y a un vent défavorable pour augmenter les quotas (ce que j'aimerais beaucoup).

 

Il va falloir que les Libéraux règlent le maudit dossier des valeurs (charte, whatever) de manière acceptable pour fermer la trappe aux fatigants de l'obsession identitaire.:stirthepot:

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Mark AC les chinois investisseurs je n'en veux pas. De toute facons ils viennent ici mais ne restent pas ils s'en vont au BC. Ca donne pas grand chose.

 

Les immigrants que l'on a besoins ce sont des gens qui ne sont pas fanatique religieux. Je ne comprend pas pourquoi on acceuillent pas de jeunes grecs ,italiens , portugais, espagnols. Les jeunes dans l'europe du sud on des taux de chomage de pres de 50%!

 

Si le gouvernement m'en donnerait le mandat j'irai chercher plein d'espagnols et de portugais instruit et pret a travailler.

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Il est édifiant de constater que tous les commentaires précédents sans exception font totalement abstraction du message central de la nouvelle rapportée ("Ottawa's share of immigrants in decline..."), pour sauter pieds joints sur une question d'actualité au Québec suite à un commentaire public de PKP.

 

Car la nouvelle porte bien sur Ottawa la ville, et non pas sur le gouvernement fédéral "personnifié" par "Ottawa", comme on dit aussi "Québec" pour désigner le gouvernement de la province homonyme.

 

J'ai écrit "édifiant" parce que cela m'informe de la perception du système urbain du Canada que l'on a à partir de Montréal, soit, essentiellement qu'à l'ouest il y a Toronto, et beaucoup plus loin, Calgary et Vancouver. Rien d'autre qui soit digne de mention. Un peu comme, vu de Québec, il y a Montréal, tellement gros qu'il fait écran à tout ce qui se "cache" derrière. Alors, on a plus de facilité à visionner Boston ou New York par-delà les Appalaches... Un vrai miracle que le grand maire de Québec soit capable de voir jusqu'à L.A. !

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