Jump to content

Recommended Posts

GO looks at a quieter ride on Montreal’s electric commuter train

Mayor-elect John Tory and Metrolinx want to electrify the rails around Toronto. The Star took a ride on Canada’s only other electric commuter line between Montreal and Deux-Montagnes, Que.

 

The 35-minute journey to the suburb of Lac des Deux Montagnes, Que., starts off like all trips from Montreal’s Central Station — downstairs on an underground platform.

 

But the Deux-Montagnes train continues in a tunnel for the first five kilometres and quietly surfaces from its portal in the affluent Mount Royal neighbourhood seven minutes later.

 

The only mainline electric train in Canada, according to Toronto rail expert Greg Gormick, the Deux-Montagnes was a natural comparator for Metrolinx officials planning the electrification of the GO system. They haven’t done a full analysis and will only say what’s obvious to a passenger — it’s a quieter, faster ride.

 

Built in the early 20th century, the commuter train speeds by the elegant Mount Royal homes and Montreal’s signature two-storey walk-ups.

 

By the time the 30-kilometre trip nears its northwest terminus, the catenary poles that hold the wires over the tracks blur against the brilliant fall colours lining the Riviere des Milles-Iles that flows into the Lake of Two Mountains.

 

Metrolinx’s executive director of electrification Karen Pitre admits the agency hasn’t found a truly comparable diesel-to-electric rail conversion on the scale GO is attempting.

 

But the Deux-Montagnes line underwent a $300-million modernization between 1992 and 1995 that has some parallels.

 

Paul Dorval of Agence Métropolitaine de Transport in Montreal, which operates the line, says he can’t see why the GO project wouldn’t doable in the 10-year horizon the Ontario government has set. An electric GO — or SmartTrack, to mayor-elect John Tory — will be a more efficient system and a better ride for commuters, he said.

 

“There is lots of economy as far as energy. Electricity costs less than diesel. You will have less pollution. You will have better acceleration so maybe you can reduce a little bit of your travel time,” said Dorval.

 

Then, there’s the noise — electric trains make less of it.

 

The quiet is conspicuous on a midday, mid-week trip when there are few riders outbound from Central Station. The overhead luggage racks are empty and only a single bike hangs on the two vertical racks in each coach.

 

It’s different in rush hour, says Dorval. The 10-car trains have 900 seats but often carry 1,800 riders, making it more like the Metro, Montreal’s busy subway. About 31,000 people move up and down the line on 49 daily weekday trips, about half of them peak-period commuters.

GO carries about the same number in 16 weekday trips on the Milton corridor.

 

Originally built to support 3,000 volts of direct current, the Deux-Montagnes was upgraded to 25,000 volts, the standard in the U.S. northeast and in Europe, said Dorval, who worked for the Quebec transportation ministry at the time of the retrofit.

 

“It took us three years to do all the construction work to modernize the line, which means rebuilding stations and even building new stations, changing old rolling stock and redoing all the infrastructure,” he said. That included the track, the signalling and control systems, as well as the catenary wires over the tracks.

 

For three summers, train service was suspended and Deux-Montagnes commuters rode buses so crews could do the overhead work on the tracks.

 

Like Toronto’s streetcars, electricity is fed to the train’s motor through the overhead catenary. A hydro substation feeds the current to the wires strung along the tracks.

 

Metrolinx officials have said they wants to keep the GO trains running electrifying the tracks. They also say they expect to run diesel and electric trains on the same tracks.

 

A 5-km test track was built at the end of the Deux-Montagnes corridor for the electric multiple units (EMUs) from Bombardier that furnish the line. Tory said during his campaign that EMUs could be used for SmartTrack.

The Deux-Montagnes EMUs run in 10-car trains. Every other car includes a motor, “so you have very good acceleration,” said Dorval. (Many GO locomotives pull 12 coaches.)

 

Faster acceleration than diesel locomotives is a key advantage of electric trains. On the GO tracks it should allow trains to make more stops in the city without significantly lengthening the journey times of long-distance commuters and facilitate more frequent service.

 

There are 10 stops between the two terminus points on the Deux-Montagnes line, some as close as two minutes apart. The Mount Royal and Canora stations, for example, are practically next door to one another but they had, over time, built up the ridership to justify keeping both stops in the makeover, said Dorval.

 

The big challenge in GO electrification will be vertical clearance for overhead wires, he said. Metrolinx has already said it will require 130 bridge expansions and 46 grade separations along with 500 km of catenary wires along its tracks.

“Everything that is metallic in the (rail) right-of-way has to be grounded but I think engineers can work it out,” said Dorval.

 

Canada’s only electric mainline train dates back 100 years

Although there were electric trains and trams in Europe in the early 1900s when the Deux-Montagnes line was built, they weren’t common in North America because they had higher upfront costs than steam locomotives.

 

The Deux-Montagnes train had to be electric because it was running in the 5-km. Mount Royal Tunnel. The tunnel was considered the fastest entry from the northwest into Montreal’s downtown. But it didn’t have the ventilation required for a steam locomotive.

 

“(Steam locomotives) are coal- or oil-fired and they produce hot gases that are poisonous when they're concentrated, as they would be within the tunnel. Where steam engines did run through long tunnels, they had to always be careful to not stall the trains because they could wind up asphyxiating the crews and passengers,” said Toronto rail expert and writer Greg Gormick

 

Diesel-electric locomotives were perfected by the late 1930s and, after the war, railroads switched to those.

 

“It's always been the high capital expense and the availability of cheap oil that's halted electrification in North America,” said Gormick.

 

“In the early 1970s, there were lots of electrification schemes as a result of the OPEC oil embargo and the energy upheaval it caused,” he said. “CP was going to electrify its Calgary-Vancouver main line and the feeder lines from the coal mines in southern B.C. But then OPEC backed off, oil prices came down and the interest in main line electrification died.”

 

http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2014/10/31/go_looks_at_a_quieter_ride_on_montreals_electric_commuter_train.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Une raison de plus pour regretter que la nouvelle ligne du "Train de l'Est" ne soit pas "tout électrique" dès le début. Ceux qui étaient en faveur, moi compris, auraient dû insister davantage.

 

Je pense pas que ça aurait donné grand chose. Le Canadien National (propriétaire des voies sur lesquelles passe la ligne Mascouche entre les gares Ahuntsic et Repentigny) est absolument contre toute forme d'électrification sur ses voies.

 

Le seul tronçon que l'AMT aurait pu électrifier sans problème, c'est le nouveau tronçon entre Repentigny et Mascouche, qui passe au milieu de l'A640... puisque ce tronçon appartient à l'AMT et non au CN. D'ailleurs, des bases de caténaires ont été construite sur ce tronçon, en vue d'une électrification future.

De toute manière l'électrification de cette ligne est peu justifiable, étant donné le niveau de service ridicule prévu.

 

Si l'AMT veut électrifier son réseau, elle devra racheter des emprises ferroviaires, en commençant par les lignes les plus achalandés (Vaudreuil, Saint-Jérôme). Déjà, rien qu'en achetant la ligne Deux-Montagnes au CN, l'AMT économise près de 5 millions par années en frais d'exploitation et droits de passage, et sans compter que les travaux d'entretien seront pas mal moins chers aussi, puisqu'ils n'auront pas à être réalisés uniquement par le CN.

 

GO Transit devrait l'avoir plus facile pour l'électrification, puisqu'elle possède près de 70% des voies sur lesquelles ses trains circulent (contre environ 31% dans le cas de l'AMT, incluant la ligne Mascouche).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Je pense pas que ça aurait donné grand chose. Le Canadien National (propriétaire des voies sur lesquelles passe la ligne Mascouche entre les gares Ahuntsic et Repentigny) est absolument contre toute forme d'électrification sur ses voies.

 

Le seul tronçon que l'AMT aurait pu électrifier sans problème, c'est le nouveau tronçon entre Repentigny et Mascouche, qui passe au milieu de l'A640... puisque ce tronçon appartient à l'AMT et non au CN. D'ailleurs, des bases de caténaires ont été construite sur ce tronçon, en vue d'une électrification future.

De toute manière l'électrification de cette ligne est peu justifiable, étant donné le niveau de service ridicule prévu.

 

Si l'AMT veut électrifier son réseau, elle devra racheter des emprises ferroviaires, en commençant par les lignes les plus achalandés (Vaudreuil, Saint-Jérôme). Déjà, rien qu'en achetant la ligne Deux-Montagnes au CN, l'AMT économise près de 5 millions par années en frais d'exploitation et droits de passage, et sans compter que les travaux d'entretien seront pas mal moins chers aussi, puisqu'ils n'auront pas à être réalisés uniquement par le CN.

 

GO Transit devrait l'avoir plus facile pour l'électrification, puisqu'elle possède près de 70% des voies sur lesquelles ses trains circulent (contre environ 31% dans le cas de l'AMT, incluant la ligne Mascouche).

 

1) Je n'étais pas "au courant" de la position du CN.

 

2) Je savais, concernant le nouveau tronçon Repentigny/Mascouche. Mais alors, cela implique logiquement qu'une entente avec le CN soit possible, ou (peu probable) que le CN vende aussi sa portion de ligne.

 

3) Entièrement d'accord.

 

4) Pourquoi GO Transit est-il plus "avancé" dans l'acquisition de voies? (historique?).

 

Tout compte fait, c'est ton point 3) qui est le plus important: merci!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1) Je n'étais pas "au courant" de la position du CN.

 

2) Je savais, concernant le nouveau tronçon Repentigny/Mascouche. Mais alors, cela implique logiquement qu'une entente avec le CN soit possible, ou (peu probable) que le CN vende aussi sa portion de ligne.

 

3) Entièrement d'accord.

 

4) Pourquoi GO Transit est-il plus "avancé" dans l'acquisition de voies? (historique?).

 

Tout compte fait, c'est ton point 3) qui est le plus important: merci!

 

En réponse à vos points :

 

1) Le CN prétexte que la maintenance de voies électrifiées serait plus complexe et la compagnie ne veut pas former davantage de gens pour ça. De plus, la présence de caténaires empêcherait le passage des wagons porte-conteneurs "double stack" (deux conteneurs de haut), surtout là où la voie passe sous un viaduc.

 

2) L'AMT prévoit éventuellement électrifier le tronçon Repentigny-Mascouche, puisqu'il appartient à l'AMT (c'est l'AMT qui a payé pour ce tronçon, sur une emprise appartenant l'AMT). et qu'il n'y a donc pas d'autorisation à obtenir du CN.

 

4) En fait, c'est Metrolinx (une agence gouvernementale ayant pour mission de gérer et d'intégrer les réseaux de transport routier et transport en commun dans le grand Toronto) qui a développé un vaste plan de rachat des emprises ferroviaires dès 2009. Depuis, Metrolinx a racheté l'entièreté des emprises des lignes Barrie, Stouffville et Lakeshore East et la majorité de l'emprise des lignes Lakeshore West, Richmond Hill et Kitchener. Du coup, pour la majorité des lignes, GO Transit/Metrolinx n'ont pas à négocier avec le CN et le CP pour faire des travaux, ajouter des trains, donner la priorité aux trains de passager, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4) Pourquoi GO Transit est-il plus "avancé" dans l'acquisition de voies? (historique?).

 

Rotax me corrigera si j'ai tort, mais voilà mon hypothèse:

 

Parce qu'à Toronto les voies principales qu'utilisent le CN et le CP pour le transport de marchandises ne sont pas dans l'axe de déplacement des navetteurs, elles contournent la ville perpendiculairement aux lignes de GO.

 

De notre côté, Montréal est une île, et le CN et le CP n'ont pas le choix de passer au travers pour assurer la liaison transcontinentale entre les États-Unis, l'Ontario, Québec et les Maritimes. Ces voies ferrées sont donc des "assets" stratégiques dont ils ne voudront jamais se départir, d'autant plus que leurs cours de triage sont à Côte-St-Luc, en plein centre de l'île. Les axes de transport de marchandises et de personnes se chevauchent donc jusqu'aux ponts et au-delà.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rotax me corrigera si j'ai tort, mais voilà mon hypothèse:

 

Parce qu'à Toronto les voies principales qu'utilisent le CN et le CP pour le transport de marchandises ne sont pas dans l'axe de déplacement des navetteurs, elles contournent la ville perpendiculairement aux lignes de GO.

 

De notre côté, Montréal est une île, et le CN et le CP n'ont pas le choix de passer au travers pour assurer la liaison transcontinentale entre les États-Unis, l'Ontario, Québec et les Maritimes. Ces voies ferrées sont donc des "assets" stratégiques dont ils ne voudront jamais se départir, d'autant plus que leurs cours de triage sont à Côte-St-Luc, en plein centre de l'île. Les axes de transport de marchandises et de personnes se chevauchent donc jusqu'aux ponts et au-delà.

 

Exact. La voie principale Est-Ouest du CP à Toronto passe à environ 4 km au nord de Union Station, et il n'y a pas de trains de banlieue, mis à part pour la ligne Milton. La voie principale du CN est encore plus au nord.

 

À Montréal, l'AMT ne pourra probablement jamais racheter les subdivisions Saint-Hyacinthe (faisant partie de la principale ligne du CN entre Montréal et Halifax, utilisée par les trains de l'AMT vers Mont-Saint-Hilaire) et la subdivision Vaudreuil (faisant partie de la principale ligne du CP entre Montréal et Toronto). C'est pourquoi, dans le cadre du projet du train de l'Ouest, l'AMT veut carrément construire de nouvelles voies complètement dédiées au transport par passagers.

 

L'AMT pourrait négocier plus facilement l'emprise utilisée par les trains de la ligne Saint-Jérôme, selon moi, surtout entre les gares Parc et Blainville (la portion de Blainville à Saint-Jérôme appartient déjà à l'AMT). Peu de trains du CP empruntent ces voies, hormis les trains de grain l'hiver. Le gros du trafic de marchandises vient surtout les trains du chemin de fer Québec-Gatineau, qui sont relativement peu fréquents (ils ont quelque chose comme 4 à 6 mouvements de trains par jour passant sur cette ligne, je dirais).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...
adblock_message_value
adblock_accept_btn_value