Recommended Posts

http://www.citylab.com/politics/2014/07/paris-wants-landlords-to-turn-vacant-office-space-into-apartmentsor-else/374388/

 

Paris Wants Landlords to Turn Vacant Office Space Into Apartments—Or Else

 

The city has a surplus of empty commercial buildings that could better serve as residences. And it plans to fine owners who don't convert.

 

<figure class="lead-image" style="margin: 0px; max-width: 620px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Oxygen, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 17px;">lead_large.jpg<figcaption class="credit" style="color: rgb(153, 153, 153); font-size: 0.82353em; text-align: right;">Justin Black/Shutterstock.com</figcaption></figure>Leave your office space unrented and we’ll fine you. That’s the new ruledeclared by the city of Paris last week. Currently, between six and seven percent of Paris' 18 million square meters of office space is unused, and the city wants to get this vacant office space revamped and occupied by residents. The penalties for unrented space will be as follows: 20 percent of the property’s rental value in the first year of vacancy, 30 percent in the second year and 40 percent in the third year. The plan is to free up about 200,000 square meters of office space for homes, which would still leave a substantial amount of office space available should demand pick up. The city insists that, while the sums involved are potentially large, this isn’t a new tax but an incentive. And, if it has the right effect in getting property re-occupied, may end up being little-used.

 

Landlords' groups are taking the new plan as well as can be expected. They’ve pointed out that, while the cost of the fines might be high, it could still cost them less to pay them than to convert their properties to homes. According to a property investor quoted in Le Figaro, the cost of transforming an office into apartments can actually be 20 to 25 percent more expensive than constructing an entirely new building. Many landlords might be unwilling or unable to undertake such a process and thus be forced to sell in a market where, thanks to a glut of available real estate, prices are falling. There is also the question of how easy the law will be to enforce: Landlords could rent out vacant properties at a token rent simply to avoid the vacancy fine.

<aside class="pullquote instapaper_ignore" style="font-family: Bitter, Georgia, 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 2.11765em; line-height: 1.05556; border-top-width: 5px; border-top-style: solid; border-top-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: solid; border-bottom-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); padding: 25px 0px; margin: 30px 0px;">As Paris becomes a laboratory for new legislation to make homes more plentiful and affordable, other European cities would do well to watch it carefully. </aside>It’s too early to see if these predictions will come true, but past experience in smaller French property markets suggests it won’t. The fines have already been introduced elsewhere in France: in the country’s fourth city of Lille (governed by the Socialist party) and in the Parisian satellite town of St Quentin-en-Yvelines (governed by the right wing UMP). So far, neither has experienced a legislation-exacerbated property slump.

It’s also fair to point out that Paris is asking for a round of belt tightening from pretty much every group involved in the city’s real estate. The new levy is part of a plan announced last month that will also pressure state and semi-public bodies to release Parisian land for home building. Paris has some fairly large reserves of this, including space currently owned by the state health authority, by the national railway network and by the RATP—Paris’ transit authority, on whose unused land alone 2,000 homes could be built.

 

In the meantime, stringent planning laws are also being relaxed to cut development costs for office converters. They will no longer, for example, be obliged to provide parking spaces for new homes, as they had been until the law change. Finally, starting next year, landlords will get an incentive to rent their properties to financially riskier lower-income tenants by having their rents and deposits guaranteed by a new intermediary, a public/private agency called Multiloc. Coming on top of laws that have relaxed building-height restrictionson the Paris periphery, it’s clear that, for Paris developers and landowners, there’s a decent ratio of carrot to stick.

 

But will it all work? At the very least, Paris deserves recognition for being proactive, especially on a continent where many cities’ grip on the property sector is floundering. Berlin has recently had major new homebuilding plansrejected by residents (for good reason—they were due to get a bad deal), while the U.K.’s number of newly built homes has actually gone down, despite property prices continuing to rise sharply. As Paris becomes a laboratory for new legislation to make homes more plentiful and affordable, other European cities would do well to watch it carefully.

(Photo credit: Justin Black/Shutterstock.com)

Edited by IluvMTL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ce genre de législation me dérange énormément! Quand le gouv. est rendu à dicter ce que tu peux faire avec TON immeuble, je trouve qu'on est rendu dans une dictature! Le socialisme à ses bienfaits, mais ceci est too much!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plusieurs hôtels à Montréal ont été convertie en appartements pour étudiants. Ces conversions sont naturellement plus facile, mais si c'était rentable de faire chose pareil avec des anciens bâtiments de bureau (classes inférieures), en leur donnant une deuxieme vie avec une nouvelle fonction résidentielle.....ceci pourra stimuler le marché pour permettre la construction des bureaux modernes. Reste à voir si la phénomène de Gramercy poursuit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

J'avais vu un reportage sur le sujet au journal de France2 il y a quelques mois. Les gens ne croyaient pas que ça allait passer puisque ce ne sont pas tous les espaces commerciaux qui peuvent être convertis en résidences.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Plusieurs hôtels à Montréal ont été convertie en appartements pour étudiants. Ces conversions sont naturellement plus facile, mais si c'était rentable de faire chose pareil avec des anciens bâtiments de bureau (classes inférieures), en leur donnant une deuxieme vie avec une nouvelle fonction résidentielle.....ceci pourra stimuler le marché pour permettre la construction des bureaux modernes. Reste à voir si la phénomène de Gramercy poursuit.

 

La grosse différence c'est qu'ici ce n'est pas le gouv. qui force ces propriétaires à convertir leurs espaces. Ils prennent cette décision eux mêmes!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • By Miska
      Le Sud-Ouest Montréal
       
      SECOND PROJET DE RÉSOLUTION - DATE LIMITE POUR SOUMETTRE UNE DEMANDE : 19 NOVEMBRE 2007.
      SECOND PROJET DE RÉSOLUTION INTITULÉ : «RÉSOLUTION AUTORISANT CERTAINS
      USAGES COMMERCIAUX EN SOUS-SOL ET PERMETTANT L’AGRANDISSEMENT DE L’ÉDICULE POUR DES FINS D’ACCESSIBILITÉ UNIVERSELLE AU 620, AVENUE ATWATER – STATION DE MÉTRO LIONEL-GROULX.»
      1. Objet du projet et demande d’approbation référendaire
      À la suite de l’assemblée publique de consultation tenue le 24 octobre 2007, le conseil de
      l’arrondissement a adopté le second projet de la résolution ci-dessus mentionnée lors de sa séance du 6
      novembre 2007.
      L’objet du présent projet de résolution vise à autoriser, à certaines conditions, certains usages
      commerciaux en sous-sol (épicerie, librairie (journaux) et restaurant / traiteur) et permettre
      l’agrandissement de l’édicule pour des fins d’accessibilité universelle au 620, avenue Atwater (station de
      métro Lionel-Groulx).
      Ce second projet contient des dispositions qui peuvent faire l’objet d’une demande de la part des
      personnes intéressées de la zone visée et des zones contiguës afin qu’une résolution qui les contient soit
      soumise à leur approbation conformément à la Loi sur les élections et les référendums dans les
      municipalités.
      Une telle demande vise à ce que la résolution contenant de telles dispositions soit soumise à
      l’approbation des personnes habiles à voter de la zone à laquelle elle s’applique et de celles de toute
      zone contiguë d’où provient une demande valide à l’égard de la disposition.
    • By Flo
      Given the ephemeral growing season in Quebec, the flimsy stretch of permanent cropland along the Saint-Laurent should be preserved at all cost.
      I believe the height limitation in the city of Montreal is exerting an obnoxious pressure on the city's biome.
      True, there are a couple of parking lots left for further development but for how long are they gonna be available.
      At any rate, in no way should urban sprawl be achieved at the expense of the very sparse amount of agricultural land left in the province.
       
      Radio Canada
      PUBLIÉ LE JEUDI 12 OCTOBRE 2017 À 22 H 54
      Montréal pourrait dilapider 2000 hectares de terres cultivables, dénoncent plusieurs groupes
       
       
       
    • By mtlurb
      Viger Project
      Montreal, Quebec, Canada
       
      Step 1: 2008
      Step 2: 2010
       
      Viger will be a 19-story, 828,000 square foot mixed-use project consisting of a 225,000 square foot hotel, 185,000 square foot of retail space, 385,000 square foot of residential space with parking for 1,400. The hotel portion includes the redevelopment of a 150,000 square foot historic chateau-style hotel.
       

       

       

       
      SUMMARY
       
      Address
      710 Rue Saint-antoine E
      Montreal, Quebec, Canada
       
      Location
      Located in Montreal, Quebec Canada
       
      Hines' Role
      Development Manager
       
      Net Rentable Area
      Hotel:
      225,000 sq. ft.
      (20,902 sq. meters)
       
      Residential:
      385,000 sq. ft.
      (35,766 sq. meters)
       
      Retail space:
      185,000 sq. ft.
      (17,186 sq. meters)
       
      The renaissance of Viger Square
      Phil O'Brien Senior advisor
      Telemedia DevelopmentI Inc. Mr. Philip O'Brien will be conducting a presentation about the Viger site on the eastern edge of Old Montreal. He will discuss the history of the site: the building of a grand hotel and railway station in what was then the central core of Montreal, its prominence as a prestigious address for business elites, and its cultural significance for the city of Montreal. The context of its decline during the 20th century will be outlined: from the changing economic conditions in the 1930s and its demise to its current state in the urban environment, resulting from the expansion of the railway yards, the digging of the open trench of the Ville-Marie expressway, and the demolition of a vast number of houses to make room for the CBC project. He will then highlight the exciting potential for redevelopment in light of changing local economic conditions and redevelopment opportunities for this area of town.
      Thursday, April 12, 2007
      from 7:30 to 9 a.m.
       
      Ritz-Carlton Montreal
      1228 Sherbrooke Street W.
      chateau_viger.pdf
    • By Atze
      Agrandir Sainte-Justine en PPP?
       
      Le Devoir
      Jacinthe Tremblay
      Édition du jeudi 09 octobre 2008
       
      Mots clés : Yves Bolduc, Sainte-Justine, Privé, Hôpital, santé, Montréal
       
      L'agrandissement du Centre hospitalier universitaire (CHU) Sainte-Justine pourrait être réalisé en partenariat public-privé, a indiqué hier en conférence de presse le ministre de la Santé et des Services sociaux, Yves Bolduc. «Ce projet de construction était d'abord prévu en mode traditionnel, mais nous pourrions aussi opter pour un PPP si nos études arrivent à la conclusion que cette façon de faire est plus rapide et moins coûteuse», a-t-il déclaré.
       
      Le Dr Bolduc venait de confirmer que le plan clinique du projet de modernisation et d'agrandissement du CHU Sainte-Justine, «Grandir en santé», était complété lorsqu'il a évoqué la possibilité d'un tel scénario. Il a également annoncé que «la direction de l'établissement était désormais autorisée à recruter des professionnels pour préparer les plans et devis préliminaires et préciser les coûts du projet». Clément Gignac, directeur exécutif du Bureau de modernisation des CHU de Montréal, a pour sa part précisé que les firmes d'ingénieurs et d'architectes chargées de cette étape étaient choisies depuis 2006. «La décision de Québec nous autorise à signer les contrats avec ces firmes. L'étape annoncée aujourd'hui devrait être complétée au printemps 2009», a-t-il précisé.
       
      Les coûts du plan «Grandir en santé» sont évalués à 503 millions de dollars. Le projet permettra entre autres de faire passer de 57 à 80 le nombre de lits de l'unité de néonatalogie. La facture sera partagée entre Québec, l'Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal et la Fondation de l'hôpital Sainte-Justine. Déjà, 67,1 millions de la somme prévue ont été engagés dans des acquisitions d'immeubles, d'équipements médicaux ainsi que pour l'érection et l'aménagement du nouveau pavillon Lucie et André Chagnon accueillant le Centre de cancérologie pédiatrique Charles-Bruneau.
       
      http://www.ledevoir.com/2008/10/09/209845.html (9/10/2008 10H10)
    • By monctezuma
      Plan du Quartier des Spectacles Masterplan
       
      Si j’ai oublié des projets, n’hésitez pas à me le dire !
       
      -------------------------------
       

       

       

       
       
      1 : Lofts des Arts, phase 1 - 10 étages
       
      2 : Lofts des Arts, phase 2 - 25 étages
       
      3 : Terrain vague, métro St-Laurent
       
      4 : Redéveloppement de la rue Ste-Catherine
       
      5 : 2-22 Ste-Catherine - 6 étages
       
      6 : Agrandissement / rénovation de la S.A.T. - 4 étages
       
      7 : Quadrilatère St-Laurent ~ 5 étages
       
      8 : Maison du développement durable - 5 étages
       
      9 : Le Parterre / Esplanade Clark
       
      10 : Promenade des artistes
       
      11 : Salle de l'OSM

      12 : Rénovation Place des arts / Grand foyer culturel
       
      13 : Place des festivals
       
      14 : 400 Sherbrooke ouest - 38 étages
       
      15 : Le Concorde - 19 étages
       
      16 : Louis-Bohème - 28 étages
       
      17 : Mise en lumière du GESÙ
       
      18 : Place du SPECTRUM / Complexe SIDEV - 26 étages
       
      19 : LADMMI et Tangente
       
      20 : Édifice Wilder
       
      21 : Édifice des Grands ballets canadiens de Montréal
       
      22 : Maison du jazz
       
      23 : Théâtre du Nouveau Monde, phase 2
       
      24 : Condos Dell'Arte