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Welcome to Startupfest 2013!

 

For the third year in a row, the International Startup Festival is bringing together aspiring founders, groundbreaking innovators, and veteran entrepreneurs from around the world. Happening July 10th-13th in Montreal, it’s the global startup community’s chance to share thoughts, do business and have a blast!

 

 

http://startupfestival.com/en/

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Mtl is well in top class of many economic sectors, like video games, aerospace, pharmaceuticals, etc. Forget the whining mark. He's a sorry ass with an obsessive compulsive mind focussed on whta's wrong in Mtl. Just because Mtl is a "leftist" city, in his mind. He'll be happy only when a Rob Ford conservative is elected here (he's gonna say no, now, because of all the shit happening in Tor, but 2 years ago, he certainly cheered him and probably claiming the jerk was a genius...).

 

Forget mark. Forget, forget. He's just pathetic.:thumbsdown:

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Mtl is well in top class of many economic sectors, like video games, aerospace, pharmaceuticals, etc. Forget the whining mark. He's a sorry ass with an obsessive compulsive mind focussed on whta's wrong in Mtl. Just because Mtl is a "leftist" city, in his mind. He'll be happy only when a Rob Ford conservative is elected here (he's gonna say no, now, because of all the shit happening in Tor, but 2 years ago, he certainly cheered him and probably claiming the jerk was a genius...).

 

Forget mark. Forget, forget. He's just pathetic.:thumbsdown:

 

Would be interested to see if moderators support the insults coming from MTLMAN.

 

I have the right to be critical of Montreal's economic performance. Every GDP statistic, investment statistic and now even start-up statistics demonstrates a lag with Montreal vs. ROC or vs. it's global peers.

 

It's good to be ambitious by the way. MTLMAN you seem like you enjoy mediocrity.

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Competition should be seen as a challenge, not an issue in itself. But why should I waste my time trying to explain this to you, you,re not listening, just voicing.

 

Les égos se nourrissent et se renforcent par la controverse, ce que tu fais sur absolument tous les fils de discussions. Je n'aime pas toucher à la vie privée des gens, mais ton comportement est symptomatique d'un grand malaise intérieur. Tu devrais alors t'occuper davantage de ta personne et non des problèmes hypothétiques de Montréal, que tu cherches à démontrer sans grand succès, puisqu'ils sont en réalité davantage des réflexions de ton mental.

 

Je n'entrerai donc plus dans ton jeu. Désolé mais tu dois être très frustré dans ta vie. Je plains ton entourage, car au travail et dans ta vie privée, ça doit être invivable. :biting:

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I’m a relative newbie here and I don’t post much, but I read a lot. I find this forum great for respectful debate but I must say this particular thread has really taken a turn. I can see why some people get turned off by marc_ac’s approach as it can be negative, but the mean and insulting responses by some towards him are more unpleasant in my mind. I feel like there is room for debate without personal insults.

I happen to think Montreal is doing quite well in a lot of areas, and I know many people personally (probably hundreds) that I come into contact through my work that have moved here from elsewhere in Canada and the world to work in our star industries. However, to deny that overall wealth here is lower than it should be, or could be is just blindness. With regards to entrepreneurship, we should be more ambitious. How this can be accomplished is through better collaborations between universities and private companies, something that is done very well in a lot of US cities, but much less well in Canada. Is this because our universities are so underfunded? Quite likely if you ask me. But proper investment can lead to huge windfalls. This is quote is about Stanford University, where I was before Montreal: (Wikipedia)

“Faculty and alumni have founded many prominent companies including Google, Hewlett-Packard, Nike, Sun Microsystems, and Yahoo!, and companies founded by Stanford alumni generate more than $2.7 trillion in annual revenue, equivalent to the 10th-largest economy in the world”

Some of the companies are still located in the city they were founded. Google is a few minutes from the campus is Palo Alto. This could happen in Montreal too, considering the size of our university population.

A final quote, from Jean-Guy Desjardins from Fiera Capital of Montreal. “When he’s asked why Montreal hasn’t really taken off as a financial centre, he’s blunt. “There is not enough ambition, not enough entrepreneurship.” (from the Gazette, May 23rd)

I hope the debates can continue without insults. I appreciate all the points of view I read here. Cheers.

Edited by AFS
typo
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Thanks AFS. Some people just want better for Montreal - and the state of mediocrity in the city is insane at times.

 

The latest startup ranking showing Toronto 6:1 on Montreal for start-up's. We are somehow content with this.

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You don't need to be so condescending. I'm tired of Montreal being outclassed by it's peers. At least somebody here has the balls to stand up for the city. I can't be the only one here that hopes Montreal could return to it's former glory.

 

Ah yes, big internet balls! The bravery of an anonymous online serial-complainer! Bravo. Such immense courage surely deserves a medal! You are a true hero.

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Thanks AFS. Some people just want better for Montreal - and the state of mediocrity in the city is insane at times.

 

The latest startup ranking showing Toronto 6:1 on Montreal for start-up's. We are somehow content with this.

 

Absolutely no one said they were happy about that. But you are the only one who makes it sound as if it's the end of the world. Since the election the PQ, you seem completely traumatized and you lost your sense of nuance. Montreal can't be number one in Canada in every domain, it's insane to wish that. But the way you paint it, it likes this town is regressing into a third world backwater hole. Montreal is booming. Not as much as we all wish, maybe not as much as Toronto or Calgary, but still.

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Thanks AFS. Some people just want better for Montreal - and the state of mediocrity in the city is insane at times.

 

The latest startup ranking showing Toronto 6:1 on Montreal for start-up's. We are somehow content with this.

 

The problem with you is that you only look for lists where Montreal finishes lower than some other city. When you find one - whatever the topic or however dubious the source - you hail it as THE definitive indicator that everything is a disaster and that everyone is accepting "mediocrity". Meanwhile, you ignore every positive indicator that doesn't fit with your predetermined doomsday scenario. Lists where Montreal tops other cities are irrelevant and don't interest you as they go against your "everything is fucked" mentality.

 

To top things off, you don't seem to have the intelligence or desire to weed out the bullshit or to understand anything within its context. You see a list, it has negative connotations, you launch into a nonsensical diatribe. "Montreal only has 6 startups!!!!!!" says some list. Whereas an intelligent person would likely question this because it doesn't sound correct - and do a .5 second search which reveals at least 51 startups http://www.montrealtechstartup.com/#. Not mark_ac, he believes everything he reads (but ONLY if it puts Montreal in a negative light of course - good lists are irrelevant and to be ignored).

 

I'd be willing to bet that you've never lived anywhere else in the country or the world because your posts reek of someone who has no clue and no basis upon which to make comparisons between different cities - other than looking for lists on the internet. You come off as a miserable little wretch of a human being who does nothing but complain and blame everybody else while you do nothing but look for lists that will make you more miserable.

 

I have to give you credit though, if I were as deeply unhappy as you are I probably would have put myself out of my misery by now.

 

And don't pm me again - EVER!

Edited by Habfanman
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Welcome to Startupfest 2013!

 

For the third year in a row, the International Startup Festival is bringing together aspiring founders, groundbreaking innovators, and veteran entrepreneurs from around the world. Happening July 10th-13th in Montreal, it’s the global startup community’s chance to share thoughts, do business and have a blast!

 

 

http://startupfestival.com/en/

 

 

Il y a des gens qui travail sur cette problématique, je sais qu'il y a de nouveaux fonds de capital de risque et je sais aussi que certaines universités travaillent fort pour mettre en place des partenariats. Juste cette semaine j'ai lu au moins deux articles dans les journaux où il était question d'un partenariat université/privé en recherche et dévelloppement pour des projet privé particulier.

 

Je ne connais rien en start-up dans le milieu des tech alors pourquoi cracher mon venin sur un sujet que je ne connais pas. Il serait intéressant de débattre en effet mais certains ne font que chialer en nous disant que les québecois sont un "petit peuple sans envergure", des "médiocres" ou je sais pas quel insulte gratuite. J'ai assé entendu ça dans le canada anglais dans ma vie pour dire qu'il n'est pas nécéssaire que les quebecois se le dise eux-mêmes. Un débat n'implique pas se genre de propos. Se genre de personne ne fond pas partie de la solution, ils ne veulent pas en faire partie. Ils font plutôt partie du problème.

 

Ma famille fait partie du 1% ( oui nous avous misé tout nos avoir et hypothéqué nos avoirs) alors oui je serais intéressé à débattre sur le sujet et trouver des solutions pour améliorer la situation et trouver des solutions mais pas avec des chialeux professionnels qui dénigrent tout le monde.

 

Les gens qui chialent le plus sont ceux qui en font le moins dans la vie. Ils ont une opinion sur tout mais en fait c'est un gros vide.

 

Ça me fait penser à Etienne. Je ne suis presque jamais d'accord avec lui, ni avec ces actions mais au moins lui apporte des arguments et des solutions. Solutions que je n'approuve pas mais il débat pareil.

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