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By Eric Moskowitz | GLOBE STAFF MAY 19, 2013

 

The city’s on-street bike lanes are marvels to US visitors.

 

We had pedaled half a block from the vibrant Jeanne-Mance Park, past tennis matches, a youth league football game, and the filming of a music video, when it dawned on me: We were biking in one direction, and the cars were pointed in another. But this was no rogue move by our tour guide, leading us the wrong way down a one-way street. Pavement markings invited it.

 

Stopping ahead, guide Martin Coutu pointed out a defining feature of the city’s residential neighborhoods: the cast-iron outdoor staircases leading to the upper floors of thousands of two- and three-story walkups, allowing the homes to achieve a gracious sidewalk setback without ceding interior space for shared entries and stairwells.

 

Still, I couldn’t help marveling over that bike lane, beckoning two-way cycling down an otherwise one-way street. I could picture just a single block like it in Cambridge and none in Boston. But as we followed Coutu along Fitz & Follwell Co.’s ’Hoods and Hidden Gems tour, it became clear that, in Montreal, it was one of many.

 

Coursing through the city, we followed all manner of on-street bike lanes — plain old painted lanes, two-way lanes, lanes protected from traffic by plastic rods or concrete curbs — and off-street bike paths. We even saw some bicycle-specific traffic lights. Painted markings guided us through intersections, and signs told drivers to give us the right of way. More remarkably, they obeyed.

 

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If you go biking in Montreal...

 

On that four-hour tour, and again riding around the city on the bike-sharing network known as Bixi, no one honked at us, not even once. It was liberating, allowing us to follow Coutu — a cheerful character with the whippet build of a bike messenger, unafraid to give a playful squeeze to the bulbous retro horn affixed to his handlebars — without any white-knuckled worry about staying alive.

 

“The majority of our customers are American,” Shea Mayer, Fitz & Follwell’s founder, told me later, “and they all say, ‘It’s unbelievable. I live in Boston, I live in New York’ — or California, or wherever it is — ‘and not only can I not believe the amount of lanes you have, but I can’t believe we haven’t been run off the road yet.’ ”

 

And there was plenty to see following those bike lanes, on a tour inspired by Mayer’s idea of a perfect day off in Montreal, often ranked as the most bike-friendly city in North America.

 

Riding a stylish set of Dutch-inspired upright bikes, we weaved through the colorful neighborhoods that fan out to the east and northeast of the verdant peak known as Mont Royal, including Mile-End, Outremont, and Petite Italie. We stopped to sample wood-fired, sesame seed-covered bagels on Rue Saint-Viateur; sip exquisitely prepared cappuccino at Café Olimpico; and explore the open-air stalls of the Jean-Talon Market, the larger, locally minded cousin to the tourist-choked Atwater Market on the waterfront.

 

Mayer started Fitz & Follwell as a one-man outfit in 2009, soon growing it into an eight-guide business and a boutique in the hip neighborhood known as The Plateau, where he rents and sells bikes and offers locally made, bike-friendly products such as a leather crossbar holster for wine bottles. The outings now include a food tour by foot and winter toboggan and snowshoe expeditions in the city’s famed parks, but the bread and butter is still the April through October bike tour. It is designed not as a stop-and-go sightseeing tour that happens to be by bicycle, but a two-wheeled immersion in, and celebration of, a place with a deeply ingrained bike culture.

 

Having written about Boston’s push under Mayor Thomas M. Menino to end its status as the scourge of the biking world, starting from zero to add 60 miles of bike lanes, and launching the Hubway bike-share network, I was aware of the basic facts about Montreal. It boasts hundreds of miles of bike lanes, and its Bixi system, with more than 400 stations and 5,100 bikes, is four times as extensive as Hubway.

 

But the numbers tell only part of it. This is a rare city beyond Europe where bicycling is not just a form of daring recreation or reluctant transportation but an essential, accepted part of everyday life. It is the way urbanites get to the pub, the park, the office, the grocery store. I saw bikes as fashion statements and bikes outnumbering cars, three or four fastened to every parking-meter post on the bar-, cafe-, and boutique-laden Saint-Laurent and Saint-Denis avenues.

 

Not that I had come to Montreal intent on geeking out on the bike infrastructure and scene. My girlfriend, Hannah, and I had been drawn by the city’s traditional allures: food, culture, architectural charm, and proximity to Boston.

 

Before we went, Hannah made a Facebook appeal for suggestions, and a friend in New York quickly responded, declaring Fitz & Follwell “the best thing I’ve ever done as a tourist” — anywhere. A Google search yielded similar superlatives on TripAdvisor, where the company holds the top ranking among all manner of Montreal tour providers, so we booked.

 

What distinguishes Fitz & Follwell was never clearer than at the end of the tour, after we had admired more outdoor staircases and followed Coutu through a world tourists rarely see: the intricate network of back alleys that were once the unremarkable setting for so many anonymous coal deliveries and trash collections, but that have been enlivened recently with lush gardens, ivy-draped terraces, and candy-colored murals.

 

Winding down, we ducked into a boulangerie and pedaled behind Coutu to Parc La Fontaine, where he laid a blanket on a rare stretch of unoccupied grass and we sat down to a spread of ripe strawberries and cherry tomatoes from Jean-Talon Market, made-to-order sandwiches from the boulangerie, and ice-cold craft beers.

 

As we sipped, ate, and laughed, another group biked into view on the far side of the lawn, gathering around a leader. Not only were they not enjoying a picnic, but they were clad in matching fluorescent vests, like members of a prison road crew.

 

“That’s the other bike tour,” Coutu said, grinning impishly. “They’re people who get lost easily.”

 

Watching them, it was easy to forget we weren’t locals ourselves — or, at least, visitors being shown around by a savvy friend.

 

When we got back to the shop, we lingered, reluctant to let go of the leather grips on those Dutch-inspired bikes. So we did the next best thing, renting Bixis to explore places suggested by Coutu as we had buzzed by — only so many eating stops can be squeezed into one tour.

 

Undaunted by intermittent rain, we rode in the evening along part of the Canal-de-Lachine, a 35-year-old bike path that traces a canal abandoned after the 1959 opening of a shipping channel in the mighty St. Lawrence River, and followed another bike path along part of the city’s active industrial port and over the low-slung Pont de la Concorde bridge, reaching Île Sainte-Hélène, the leafy epicenter of Expo ’67, still anchored by the Biosphere and an amusement park.

 

Darkness settling in, we followed a path to the other side of the island and found a trail leading to the Jacques Cartier Bridge, an 11,000-foot steel truss span that rises 162 feet above the St. Lawrence, similar in size and design to Boston’s Tobin Bridge. However crazy the idea of biking the Tobin might sound, here we found an inviting bike lane — and an exhilarating one, high above the jet-black water — running along one side of the Cartier, protected from traffic.

 

Pedaling back to downtown, I thought about something Coutu had said: Montreal wasn’t always so bike-friendly, it just had an earlier start.

 

I considered Boston, where bicycle counts are rising, and new lanes, albeit unprotected ones, are striped every year. As the city lights came closer, I realized I wasn’t just pedaling toward the most bikeable city on the continent. I was seeing a vision of Boston’s future.

 

http://www.bostonglobe.com/lifestyle/travel/2013/05/18/bike-tour-montreal/Q7r2F3g6TIuwiiITu0ypGL/story.html

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On voit que même si on chiale ici, l'opinion de Montréal à l'étranger est très positive! Et par rapport à ce qu'il dit : ''I realized I wasn’t just pedaling toward the most bikeable city on the continent (Montréal). I was seeing a vision of Boston’s future.'' : on peut dire que pour une fois depuis longtemps, on est en avance:)

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L'herbe est toujours plus verte chez le voisin! Exemple typique. Les Montréalais chialent que les lignes sur la rue sont dangereuses, les étrangers en sont en pamoison. Comme l'être humain est fascinant.

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Un seul commentaire : je travaille parfois pour "the other bike tour comme le disait Coutu. Premièrement : je n'ai jamais entendu un seul guide de "l'autre compagnie" faire un seul commentaire mesquin à propos de Fitz & Follwell. Pourtant, je pourrais : les dossards qu'on fait porter aux touristes leurs permettent d'être bien vus de tous et cela accentuent leur sentiment de sécurité.

 

Deuxièmement, je croise souvent les tours de Fitz & Follwell et leurs guides s'arrêtent souvent en plein milieu de trottoir, bloquant toute circulation pédestre. Ils traversent des rues de façons dangereuses avec leurs clients et manquent d'encadrement. J'ai déjà vu certains de leurs clients qui traînaient loin du groupe être quasiment perdu, ne sachant plus dans quelle direction le groupe était parti.

 

C'est sans aucun doute une expérience mémorable mais selon moi, ils jouent avec le feu et ce n'est qu'une question de temps avant qu'ils soient victimes d'un incident malheureux. Ils ont intéret à améliorer la sécurité de leurs groupes.

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Un seul commentaire : je travaille parfois pour "the other bike tour comme le disait Coutu. Premièrement : je n'ai jamais entendu un seul guide de "l'autre compagnie" faire un seul commentaire mesquin à propos de Fitz & Follwell. Pourtant, je pourrais : les dossards qu'on fait porter aux touristes leurs permettent d'être bien vus de tous et cela accentuent leur sentiment de sécurité.

 

Deuxièmement, je croise souvent les tours de Fitz & Follwell et leurs guides s'arrêtent souvent en plein milieu de trottoir, bloquant toute circulation pédestre. Ils traversent des rues de façons dangereuses avec leurs clients et manquent d'encadrement. J'ai déjà vu certains de leurs clients qui traînaient loin du groupe être quasiment perdu, ne sachant plus dans quelle direction le groupe était parti.

 

C'est sans aucun doute une expérience mémorable mais selon moi, ils jouent avec le feu et ce n'est qu'une question de temps avant qu'ils soient victimes d'un incident malheureux. Ils ont intéret à améliorer la sécurité de leurs groupes.

 

 

est-ce que l'autre compagnie, fait aussi porter des insigne aux touriste disant" j'ai deux ans d'age mental, mes parents habitent a tel adresse..." ou peut-être aussi tremper les touristes dans une teinture rose fluo de la tête aux pieds, juste au cas ou un d'eux retire sas veste pour avoir moins chaud.

 

Il y a des limite a traiter les gens comme des imbéciles, ils ont des responsabilités et doivent être responsable de leurs actions.

 

pour ce qui est de ne jamais faire de commentaires mesquins, j'ose pas imaginer ce que ce serait si vous en faisiez? juste une idée comme ça.

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