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Malek

German mayor creates controversial men-only parking spaces

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men-only-parking.jpg

 

 

The small town of Triberg, Germany is creating big headlines these days, after its mayor designated a number of difficult or tricky parking spaces for men-only. Mayor Gallus Strobel has risked countless accusations of sexism after marking the town's toughest parking spots with a male or female symbol depending on their level of difficulty.

 

"Men are, as a rule, a little better at such challenges... There are also great women drivers who are, of course, most welcome!" Mayor Strobel told German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung.

 

The idea behind this new policy was designed to attract ambitious drivers to utilize more difficult spaces. Parking spaces which are wider, well-lit and close to exits have been painted with female symbols, while narrow, obstructed and awkwardly angled spots have been labeled with male symbols.

 

So far the parking challenge has been met with mixed opinions, however its also increased tourism to the area, as countless drivers have traveled to the small town in order to test their parking abilities.

 

A major study in Britain earlier this year showed that while women might be slower at parking, they are more accurate and have better technique. The survey also suggests men liked to "pose park" by opting to park in a smaller spots, even when a larger spot is available.

 

http://worldnews.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/07/10/12664764-german-mayor-designates-parking-spaces-just-for-men?lite

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That man is a genius! Probably wouldn't fly in PC North America!

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What's ridiculous about the media treatment of this whole story, is the emphasis on the fact that he painted male signs on certain spots, if that city only painted women's signs on certain spot (closer to the doors, well lit...) it would probably lauded as a great achievement for women's right, now, it's being turned into a discrimination thing against them and the mayor is being accused of being sexist.

 

http://fr.canoe.ca/hommes/enginsetgadgets/archives/2012/07/20120710-103703.html

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C'est limite sexiste quand même. (surtout au sens pure du terme).

 

Je comprend son intention, mais s'il avait peinturer un symbole genre Défi pour bon conducteur, avec une photo d'un pilote par exemple, ça n'aurais pas été sexiste et ça aurait eu le même effet. Des femmes, il y en a qui sont très bonne conductrice et y'a des gars pas très bon conducteur.

 

L'idée à la base n'est pas mauvaise, mais son application manque peu être de gout.

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