Recommended Posts

skye-halifax-537x406.jpg

 

The Canadian province of Nova Scotia is renowned for its natural beauty and fisheries, but it isn’t as well known for its skyscrapers. After all, the tallest building in Halifax, the capital city, has just 32 floors. That could all change if developer United Gulf Developments Ltd. gains approval to build Skye Halifax, a pair of curved, 48-story towers that are planned for downtown Halifax. The towers, designed by Toronto-based architectsAlliance, are meant to resemble the sails of a ship in a nod to the city’s maritime history.

 

In addition to its unique design, Skye Halifax will also have some notable green credentials. The current plan calls for a geothermal heating and cooling system, living green walls, a greywater system, low-flow plumbing fixtures, and green roof terraces. Plans also call and indoor and outdoor bike storage facilities and showers for commercial and retail tenants who commute by bike. The developer will seek LEED certification for the project. The mixed-use development will include condominiums, a boutique hotel, and ground-level retail. Construction is set to begin by the end of 2012.

http://inhabitat.com/skye-halifax-green-skyscrapers-to-be-the-tallest-towers-in-nova-scotia/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By ProposMontréal
      Pas de Camion à Déchets dans le QDS
       
      Source: Spacing Montreal
       

       
      There aren’t going to be any dump trucks blocking up the streets in Montreal’s new Quartier des Spectacles. Last Wednesday, the City approved a proposition to replace public trash cans with receptacles for garbage, recyclables and compostables, all hooked up to an vacuum-powered collection system. Waste placed in each receptacle would be sucked into a network of underground tubes and transported to a central processing location (possibly located in Place Desjardins).
       
      At first glance, this system may seem unduly costly and invasive, not to mention energy intensive. But since the streets in the QDS are already slotted to be ripped up in order to replace ageing sewers, aqueducts and power-lines, throwing in the waste-collection system will only cost an additional $8.2 million (according to a planner who worked on the proposal). Under the new system, garbage collection in the neighborhood would rely on electricity rather than fossil fuels, which may not be a bad idea given the cost and environmental impacts of burning fuel.
       
      Most importantly, the new garbage collection system would also apply to residents and businesses located in the Quartier des Spectacles. For instance, the restaurants in Place Desjardins would be able to be compost food scraps, saving several hundred tons of waste from landfills each year.
       
      Although Montreal is behind cities like Toronto who offer composting for household waste, this initiative would be the first in North America to offer composting on the public domain and for businesses.
       
      ENVAC, the European company that engineers these systems worldwide, built their first trash-vacuuming system in Stockholm in 1961 and it is still in operation (it has an expected lifespan of about 50 years, although that is probably standard for sewers and other infrastructure).
       
      Teaching the hoards of drunken festival-goers and clueless tourists to sort trash from recyclables and organic waste is a challenge for the future…
    • By MARTY
      Just south of the Metropolitan in a 3 building mall where Zellers, an old Maxi and the infamous Millenium Club were doing business for years is now completely vacated and is just waiting for the wrecker's ball. This is a huge site that can easily accomodate 10 or more condo towers like the Villa Latella on Boul. des Galleries d'Anjou. Just south on Jean Talon near Provencher the 6 storey Bellavista condo building is having it's underground garage carved out. This great to see!! the whole island is rocking with development!!
    • By monctezuma
      539 Sainte-Catherine Street
       

       
      Montreal, QC
       
      This building is situated at the northeast corner of Sainte-Catherine and Aylmer, across the street from The Bay's 640,000 sq. ft. main store.
       
      The property can accommodate a tenant of up to 5,000 sq. ft. on the ground floor, with potential for a mezzanine if required.
       
      The 40 foot facade on Sainte-Catherine Street, ceiling heights above 14 ft., excellent visibility, and the presence of many national retailers in the immediate vicinity create an ideal location for a flagship retail store in downtown Montreal.
       
      The building is undergoing a retrofit with completion expected in spring, 2012.
       
      http://www.canderel.com/news-communication/539-sainte-catherine-street
    • By YMQ
      According to Leftcoaster on SSP - some more developments in the works around the Bell Center with apparently neat architecture. However one big idea was apparently abandoned recently - I wonder why
       
    • By pedepy
      having recently walked through griffintown from downtown towards verdun i found that while the area is filled with many condo projects most of them look they have been there for quite a while and they all seem to be waiting after one another to 'pop' from the ground ... in the meantime the place still looks awfully desolate and abandoned and you have to think that this has an effect on the health of those projects - it's not like the city lacks any plans for griffintown but don't you think they should be more proactive about it and inject some fund in the neighborhood to help spur the growth of all these residential towers instead of waiting for them to actually get built before they do anything ? chicken and the egg kinda situation now it seems but imo the city should be the first to do actually do something and not the private developers .. after all all these years down the road its the city that will still be collecting tax funds if anything gets built - not the initial investors