Jump to content

ville-marie Parc Jean-Drapeau : rénovations


jesseps

Recommended Posts

Pinned posts
  • Administrator

Parc Jean-Drapeau

 

Nouveau Plan Directeur 2020-2030

https://www.parcjeandrapeau.com/fr/plan-directeur-de-conservation-amenagement-developpement-2020-2030-parc-jean-drapeau-montreal/

image.png.b2df49f9c03e4d0b66d94030a0f82edf.png

 

 

"Réalisation d'un nouvel aménagement contemporain de la portion sud de l'île Sainte‑Hélène en y introduisant un amphithéâtre naturel ayant une capacité de 65 000 personnes.

L'allée centrale devant l'édicule du métro sera agrandie permettant de la relier à la sculpture Trois disques (L'Homme) d'Alexander Calder, à la Biosphère et jusqu'au pont du Cosmos. L'aménagement de cette allée permettra d'optimiser les services d'accueil, de restauration, de sécurité et de transport actif et collectif."

http://www.parcjeandrapeau.com/fr/projet-amenagement-mise-en-valeur-ile-sainte-helene-pamv/

Lien vers la webcam du projet: https://www.devisubox.com/dv/dv.php5?pgl=Project/interface&sRef=1T0Q6ZFYK

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 years later...

La Place des Nations mérite-t-elle d'être sauvée ?

 

Vous trouverez mon point de vue sur la Place des Nations, pour ceux qui ne veulent pas la lire, je suis assez à cheval sur le sujet.

Je ne suis pas convaincu qu'elle doit absolument être sauvegardée, mais son départ serait une perte tout de même.

 

On dirait que chaque démolition à Montréal apporte son lot de résistence, comme si on essayait de compenser pour les erreurs du passé. Montréal dans les années 60 était une ville en pleine ébullition, le béton et l’automobile sont rois et l’Expo est à nos portes. Dans les années 60 à Montréal, la collectivité décide de s’ouvrir sur le monde et faire de la place pour de la grande visite en 1967 et ensuite en 1976. Pendant qu’on faisait de la place pour l’Autoroute Décarie, l’Échangeur Turcot, le Château Champlain ou la Place Bonaventure on détruisait à droite et à gauche des quartiers entiers et des souvenirs qui aujourd’hui, l’idée de les voir disparaître causerait une levée de bouclier sans précédent. La disparition de buildings historiques comme le Terminus Craig, l’Hôtel Laurentien, l’édifice du Crédit Foncier Franco-Canadien ou même la Synagogue Sherith serait maintenant un sacrilège.

 

Lire plus sur ProposMontréal

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 8 months later...

Opinion: Île-Ste-Hélène redesign would turn a park into an events venue

 

MARK LONDON, SPECIAL TO MONTREAL GAZETTE

More from Mark London, Special to Montreal Gazette

Published on: November 11, 2014

Last Updated: November 11, 2014 5:16 PM EDT

 

 

The curved, tree-lined Promenade des Îles on Île-Ste-Hélène goes through the legs of Alexander Calder's sculpture Man, and then to a lookout facing the downtown skyline.

The curved, tree-lined Promenade des Îles on Île-Ste-Hélène goes through the legs of Alexander Calder's sculpture Man, and then to a lookout facing the downtown

 

It’s a Montreal oddity, city administrations redoing public squares and parks every couple of decades. I remember four incarnations of Victoria Square and Place Jacques-Cartier. When historic Viger Square was “temporarily” removed to build the underground Ville-Marie Expressway, it was promised to be restored; instead we got concrete structures and a sea of pavement. Out with the old, in with the new. Something about mayors wanting to leave a (somewhat) permanent mark on the city.

 

Montrealers accept these expensive recurring projects as normal.

 

Now, the Coderre administration wants to mark Montreal’s 375th birthday by redesigning Place Jacques-Cartier, again. And redo the western part of Île Ste-Hélène, turning the public park into essentially an events venue.

 

Since I was involved in the 350th-birthday version of Île Ste-Hélène, I offer this recollection of how that came to be and invite people to go for a last visit before the bulldozers arrive.

 

In 1988, Mayor Jean Doré decided that the Expo 67 site, Îles Ste-Helene and Notre-Dame, needed a new vocation. Some parts of the two islands were actively used, others were abandoned. The western part of Île Ste-Hélène was a grim wasteland of concrete slabs, remains of the Expo pavilions demolished after Man and His World, the attempt to keep the world’s fair alive, shuttered in 1981.

 

City council approved a proposal to transform the site into what was then Montreal’s largest park, Parc des Îles, a counterpoint to Mount Royal Park: two great parks celebrating the river and the mountain. Parc des Îles was to have a dual role, naturalistic park and site of major facilities and events. The transformation included creation the Île Notre-Dame beach, recycling the French and Quebec pavilions as the Casino, and turning Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic dome into the Biosphere, an environmental-monitoring centre.

 

The centrepiece was the transformation of the western part of Île Ste-Hélène into a public green space, an extension of historic Île Ste-Hélène Park, a natural scenic landscape contrasting with the city’s built character. Pastoral greenery, not urban grey.

 

At the centre was a large oval lawn, the Parterre, and newly created hill. This green space was designed to also host the Fête des Neiges and summer music festivals, taking advantage of the magnificent view of the Montreal skyline. The space was designed to accommodate large crowds for shows, to feel like a human-scale, natural green space, not like an empty stadium. Reinforced grass under the stage and underground cable conduits allowed shows to be quickly set up and dismantled.

 

People emerging from the métro were greeted by a playful fountain, a kid’s delight, and a distant view of the skyline. Then, they walked past two pavilions housing information booth, snack bar, bicycle rental and bathrooms, onto the Promenade des Îles, a curved, tree-lined walkway, which also linked Île Notre-Dame and the Biosphere. The Promenade is wide enough to accommodate the enormous crowds of outdoor festivals, but is an interesting, human-scaled path for people simply strolling in the park during the rest of the year. Continuing northward, the Parterre is on the left and a long pond on the right, whose opposite shore corresponds to the original shoreline of Île Ste-Hélène. Farther on, people are confronted by Alexander Calder’s majestic sculpture, Man, walk between his legs, and then burst through to a lookout with a panoramic view of the river and the downtown skyline.

 

The experience is akin to Mount Royal, walking along the wooded Olmsted Rd., then stepping beyond the chalet to the lookout with its panoramic view. It’s a progressive discovery of a sequence of smaller spaces and views, a rich, human-scaled experience compared to a wide-open plaza that feels empty and impersonal when there aren’t lots of people there.

 

Place des Nations was preserved as the most intact and symbolically important piece of Expo 67, its elevated wooden beams offering interpretive panels about the fair and wonderful views of the river. A naturalistic Promenade riveraine links Place des Nations, the lookout, and a ferry dock to the east.

 

In the third edition of Montréal en évolution, architectural historian Jean-Claude Marsan said of the redesign of the western end of Île Ste-Hélène: The observer is “plunged into a natural environment where there is a succession of varied landscapes: the vast undulating lawn, waterfalls, lac des Cygnes, trails, trees with underbrush, shaded views of the river, all stamped with simplicity, charm, and harmony. To the pride felt before the panorama of the city follows a feeling of enchantment and gentle well-being; there is hardly a more satisfying sensorial experience in Montreal … One could even say, without exaggeration, that it ranks along with Frederick Law Olmsted’s Mount Royal Park and Île Ste-Hélène Park, landscaped in the 1930s by Frederick Todd, among the best that Montreal has achieved in landscape architecture throughout its history.”

 

Since then, the Parterre hosted the annual Osheaga and other festivals. In the past few years, the Société du parc Jean-Drapeau, which runs the site, covered the great lawn of the Parterre with gravel, deferred maintenance, cluttered up the Promenade with the tents and equipment, let the vegetation get overgrown or die, allowed the pond to fill with weeds, and fenced off Place des Nations, using it for storage.

 

This summer, city council approved a proposal by the Société du parc Jean-Drapeau to revamp the site and spend up to $56 million to replace the great lawn with stone dust, to enlarge the event space allowing increased ticket sales, to scrap the Promenade des Îles, including the fountain, pond, waterfalls, bridges, and trees, to build a new paved plaza farther east as an architectural statement, and to give a more formal treatment to the Promenade riveraine. Less landscape, more architecture.

 

Should this be a year-round, naturalistic, public park space, or an events venue sporadically used by private promoters? Is it possible to do both, as we attempted in the 1992 design, even if this involves some extra logistics and maintenance? The Great Lawn in New York’s Central Park accommodates concerts of up to a million people, and guess what … The lawn is grass.

 

Mark London is a planner and architect who coordinated the city of Montreal’s planning team for the redevelopment of the Expo 67 site from 1988 to 1993. He is currently executive director of the Martha’s Vineyard Commission.

 

sent via Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

56 millions pour du beton au parc jean drapeau. Toujours moins de verdure. + 35 millions pour changer l'esplanade de la place des arts. Pourquoi changer l'esplanade elle est bien comme ca. En plus les escaliers font d'excellent gradins durants les festivals. C'est quoi l'urgence de changer l'esplanade elle a deja été modifié il y a quelques années.

 

56 + 35 millions ca fait un beau 91 millions de $ que l'on pourrait investir par exemple pour faire le tunnel reliant le metro vendome avec le centre hospitalier Mcgill.

 

La ville pourrait aussi acheter le terrain derriere la maison Notman qui vaut a peu pres 2 millions de $ et en faire un parc comme beacoup le reclament.

Investir l'argent necessaire pour réouvrir le bassin de plongée sous-marine du stade olypique unique en amerique du nord.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyway, le problème principal c'est le manque d'entretien. Quand on fait un beau parc et qu'à partir de l'an 2 on ne l'entretien plus, c'est normal qu'il faille le reconstruire 20 ans plus tard. Même chose avec les infrastructures. Bienvenue au Québec, une bien petite province.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pas besoin d'entretien laisse du gazon avec des arbres ca pousse tout seul.

Anyway, le problème principal c'est le manque d'entretien. Quand on fait un beau parc et qu'à partir de l'an 2 on ne l'entretien plus, c'est normal qu'il faille le reconstruire 20 ans plus tard. Même chose avec les infrastructures. Bienvenue au Québec, une bien petite province.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A titre de simple amateur dans ce domaine, je me pose la question suivante: est-ce que les transformations proposées sont le reflet d'une "culture des espaces publics" maintenant davantage latine que anglo-saxonne, avec plus de places pavées (ou bétonnées) et des éléments de verdure (quand il y en a) très encadrés plutôt que naturels ou aléatoires.

 

L'ancien maire Jean Drapeau avait certainement les yeux davantage tournés vers Rome(!) et Paris que Londres, par exemple. Ce n'est certainement pas lui qui nous aurait "donné" le parc du Mont-Royal.

 

Aujourd'hui en 2015, ce que projette la Société du Parc Jean-Drapeau (quel nom bien choisi!) est du même ordre. Je serai bien curieux d'observer la réaction du public (ou son absence, c'est selon). Personnellement, je préfère nettement la nature libre, qui nous offre ses surprises à chaque détour, plutôt que les "parcs" qui emprisonnent les plantes comme le font les zoos pour les animaux.

 

Une chance encore que la géographie montréalaise, avec son fleuve, ses rivières et ses îles nous préserve de la totale domination de l'homme sur la nature.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On aura beau critiqué les americains je suis sure qu'ils ont plus de parc nationaux en % du territoire que nous aux quebec. Le pire dans tout ca c'est que ca coute quasiment rien de mettre des arbres et de la verdure. Ca fait juste moins prestigieux. En plus dans 25 ans on va encore recommencer a demolir et reconstruire pour feter le 400 ieme de montreal et ainsi de suite. Pis on se dit plus vert que les autres mon cul ouais. Je reve d'avoir une ville de Montreal plus verte ca couterai pas chere en plus.

A titre de simple amateur dans ce domaine, je me pose la question suivante: est-ce que les transformations proposées sont le reflet d'une "culture des espaces publics" maintenant davantage latine que anglo-saxonne, avec plus de places pavées (ou bétonnées) et des éléments de verdure (quand il y en a) très encadrés plutôt que naturels ou aléatoires.

 

L'ancien maire Jean Drapeau avait certainement les yeux davantage tournés vers Rome(!) et Paris que Londres, par exemple. Ce n'est certainement pas lui qui nous aurait "donné" le parc du Mont-Royal.

 

Aujourd'hui en 2015, ce que projette la Société du Parc Jean-Drapeau (quel nom bien choisi!) est du même ordre. Je serai bien curieux d'observer la réaction du public (ou son absence, c'est selon). Personnellement, je préfère nettement la nature libre, qui nous offre ses surprises à chaque détour, plutôt que les "parcs" qui emprisonnent les plantes comme le font les zoos pour les animaux.

 

Une chance encore que la géographie montréalaise, avec son fleuve, ses rivières et ses îles nous préserve de la totale domination de l'homme sur la nature.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

56 + 35 millions ca fait un beau 91 millions de $ que l'on pourrait investir par exemple pour faire le tunnel reliant le metro vendome avec le centre hospitalier Mcgill.

 

Le gouvernement du Québec a déjà annoncé qu'il réalisait un nouvel édicule et ce tunnel et le finançait à 100% - c'est quoi l'idée de vouloir rapatrier cette dépense? :confused:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On va attendre combien de temps apres le gouvernement du quebec pour le 2 ieme edicule. Avec le 91 millions on pourrait aussi le prendre pour changer le toit du stade. Je trouve que la ville depense dans du superflue qui ne sert qu'a des evenememts sporadiques. Que l'on depense dans des infrastructure plus utiles utiliser a l'année. On pourrait prende le 8 millions qui manque et terminer le fameux systeme de collecte de dechets par vacuum sous terrain a la place des festivals. Prendre une partie de l'argent pour reconstruire des passerelle que l'on a jeter a terre par dessus l'autoute cote de liesse mais qu'on a jamais reconstruit. On se fout completement du pieton qui doit se taper un detour pour aller travailler dans les parc industriels dans l'ouest. On pourrait aussi construire des passerelles par dessus les voies ferrée dans rosemont.

Le gouvernement du Québec a déjà annoncé qu'il réalisait un nouvel édicule et ce tunnel et le finançait à 100% - c'est quoi l'idée de vouloir rapatrier cette dépense? :confused:
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...
adblock_message_value
adblock_accept_btn_value