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Canadian provinces still dominate a list of the world’s most attractive mining jurisdictions, with Alberta claiming the top spot, according to a Fraser Institute survey released Thursday.

 

The survey, based on views of about 500 mining companies, measures the attractiveness of the mining policies implemented by governments across the globe.

 

Though a surge in metal prices has made miners more optimistic, many respondents said a growing trend of resource nationalism and new mining taxes are a cause for concern.

 

“I think for virtually every jurisdiction there is a feeling that things are getting worse, as opposed to better,”

 

said Fred McMahon, co-author of the report.

 

The Fraser Institute released the report on Thursday, just ahead of the annual PDAC prospectors and developers convention in Toronto.

 

Higher taxes and new laws in some of the world’s most investor-friendly destinations such as Quebec, Nevada, Chile and Australia have weighed on the rankings of these locations, McMahon said.

 

Miners saw the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Nevada and Saskatchewan as jurisdictions with the most appealing mining policies, but Quebec and Manitoba also made it into the top 10.

 

“Alberta is at the top by default; other recent top contenders all have some minor black mark against them,” said McMahon. “Alberta has some mining, but it is not the world’s richest mining territory.”

 

Quebec, which ranked as the most mining friendly jurisdiction for the last three years fell out of favor last year when it announced tax increases and plans to rewrite its mining laws.

 

The survey includes data on 79 jurisdictions, including sub-national jurisdictions in Canada, the United States and Australia. This year it added Bulgaria, Greenland, Guinea-Conakry, Madagascar, Niger, Romania and Vietnam.

 

Miners found Honduras the least favorable mining jurisdiction, with Venezuela and the Democratic Republic of Congo ranking only slightly higher. Others near the bottom of the list include Bolivia, India and Guatemala.

 

The world’s largest copper producer Chile, which also made it into the top ten, was by far the highest ranked jurisdiction in Latin America.

 

Botswana took the top African slot, ranking higher than gold mining hot spots like Burkina Faso and Mali.

 

“There’s one shining light in Africa and that’s Botswana,” said McMahon. “The other countries bounce around, but their overall average is about the same.”

 

McMahon said the annual survey, now in its 15th year, lets miners share their views on laws and practices in the various places in which they operate.

 

“The report is also really helpful for governments, which often times simply do not realize the impact of their policies,” said McMahon.

 

Colombia is the hottest new mining destination in the world, McMahon says. The country has emerged as a promising mining location nearly a decade after the government launched an offensive to end a long guerrilla conflict.

 

“Colombia is still ranked low in our survey and it will probably never hit the top, but miners are beginning to understand that Colombia has turned itself around and that there is lots of potential there,” he said.

 

(Courtesy of the Financial Post)

 

Speaking of mining in Quebec, I took a massive hit from CLQ :mad: Luckily I sold off like half my shares at a profit days before it lost 50% :)

 

Seeing I do not want to make another topic, here is a graph of the top 10 largest mergers in Canada from 2010, I wonder what 2011 has in store for Canada.

rb-big-deals-graph_1221326a.jpg

Edited by jesseps

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      [TABLE=class: tg, width: 475]
      <tbody>[TR]
      [TH=class: tg-acmm, bgcolor: #F1C40F]Store Type[/TH]
      [TH=class: tg-acmm, bgcolor: #F1C40F]Square Footage[/TH]
      [TH=class: tg-acmm, bgcolor: #F1C40F]Date Initiated[/TH]
      [/TR]
      [TR]
      [TD=class: tg-031e]Discount Store[/TD]
      [TD=class: tg-031e]106,000 sq. ft.[/TD]
      [TD=class: tg-031e]1962[/TD]
      [/TR]
      [TR]
      [TD=class: tg-031e]Supercenter[/TD]
      [TD=class: tg-031e]182,000 sq. ft.[/TD]
      [TD=class: tg-031e]1982[/TD]
      [/TR]
      [TR]
      [TD=class: tg-031e]Neighborhood Market[/TD]
      [TD=class: tg-031e]38,000 sq. ft.[/TD]
      [TD=class: tg-031e]1998[/TD]
      [/TR]
      [TR]
      [TD=class: tg-031e]Express Store[/TD]
      [TD=class: tg-031e]15,000 sq. ft.[/TD]
      [TD=class: tg-031e]2011[/TD]
      [/TR]
      [TR]
      [TD=class: tg-031e]College Store[/TD]
      [TD=class: tg-031e]Under 5,000 sq. ft.[/TD]
      [TD=class: tg-031e]2013[/TD]
      [/TR]
      </tbody>[/TABLE]
       
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      Target, Whole Foods, Safeway, Giant, and other chains are already breaking the rules by building smaller footprint stores in multi-story buildings and mixed use developments.
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      In some ways, the idea of national chains opening big new urban stores is a return to the way things once were. In 1960, we called it department store. Today we call it a Walmart.
      Ed McMahon is one of the country’s most incisive analysts of planning and land use issues and trends. He holds the Charles Fraser Chair on Sustainable Development and is a Senior Resident Fellow at the Urban Land Institute in Washington, DC. McMahon is a frequent speaker at conferences on planning and land development.
      Over the past 21 years, we’ve been pleased to have published more than two dozen articles by McMahon in the Planning Commissioners Journal, and now on PlannersWeb.com.

      Notes:
       

      Dan Maloutt, “Walmart’s 6 DC stores: Some will be urban, some won’t” (Greater Greater Washington blog, April 26, 2012) ↩
      Allison Brooks, “The world’s tiniest Walmart opens in Atlanta” (Atlanta Magazine, Aug. 14, 2013 ↩
      Todd Gill, “Now open: Walmart on Campus” (Fayetteville Flyer, Jan. 14, 2011).↩
      Ryan Holeywell, “Walmart Makes Its Urban Debut” (Governing Magazine, June 2012) ↩
      Id. ↩